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Old 06-18-2017, 08:54 PM
 
Location: southern born and southern bred
12,477 posts, read 17,810,380 times
Reputation: 19597

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I brought the bird inside and it's a pet carrier in my bathroom; away from harm's way from my dogs and cats. I boiled an egg and made a pudding type mixture with the yolk, used an eye dropper and put a bit on it's beak. This is only temporary until the local Nature Center opens on Tuesday. I could not leave it outdoors on the ground for fear of it getting killed by another animal.
Any more advice appreciated.
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Old 06-22-2017, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Southern Quebec
1,433 posts, read 1,512,548 times
Reputation: 2231
Do you have a wildlife sanctuary near you?

Here's a few tips from Le Nichoir.

Le Nichoir First Aid

First Aid

DO make sure the bird needs your assistance before interfering, or kidnapping the bird.
DO attempt to replace baby birds in their nest, or re-unite them with their mother (if they have truly been lost): parents are the experts at raising baby birds. Parent birds will not reject babies which have been touched by a human: birds have no sense of smell.
DO keep the bird in a quiet, dark, safe place, away from noise, children, and animals.
DO NOT handle the bird, or cuddle it in your hands, even if it appears calm. In the eyes of a bird, human beings are the worst predators. Handling places severe stress on the bird, and will lead to, or increase shock, leading to death. Talking to the bird will also frighten it.
DO NOT attempt to feed the bird, or give it water or milk to drink. If the bird cannot eat or drink on its own, it will not be able to tolerate forced feeding.
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Old 06-22-2017, 10:59 PM
 
26,832 posts, read 22,611,430 times
Reputation: 10052
Quote:
Originally Posted by PippySkiddles View Post
I brought the bird inside and it's a pet carrier in my bathroom; away from harm's way from my dogs and cats. I boiled an egg and made a pudding type mixture with the yolk, used an eye dropper and put a bit on it's beak. This is only temporary until the local Nature Center opens on Tuesday. I could not leave it outdoors on the ground for fear of it getting killed by another animal.
Any more advice appreciated.
How big is the bird?
Is it an adult already or still a baby bird?
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:45 PM
 
Location: southern born and southern bred
12,477 posts, read 17,810,380 times
Reputation: 19597
Quote:
Originally Posted by erasure View Post
How big is the bird?
Is it an adult already or still a baby bird?
it was a baby about ready to leave the nest. The next day the other one that was still in the nest took off. I ended up taking it to a Nature Center.
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Old 06-23-2017, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Southern Quebec
1,433 posts, read 1,512,548 times
Reputation: 2231
I'm glad that you took the bird to a Nature Center, and hope that the bird will thrive.
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Old 06-23-2017, 07:02 PM
 
26,832 posts, read 22,611,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PippySkiddles View Post
it was a baby about ready to leave the nest. The next day the other one that was still in the nest took off. I ended up taking it to a Nature Center.
And they took it with no problems?
Lucky you.
I found a baby starling recently (it was a day he was starting to open his eyes) and the "Nature Conservancy" ( or whatever was the agency name that I was referred to) didn't want anything to do with it, since it was not an "endangered specie.") They basically told me I was on my own.
Which I was. So I raised him myself on dog food, which he was chomping up like there was no tomorrow)))
( And yes, I gave him some water from the dropper, although all the gurus on-line were saying that it was a no-no, a horrible deed)))
But he was clearly dehydrated and about to die ( as a matter of fact his sibling was lying there next to him already dead,) so it was the right move I assume, since after that he was able to eat, crumb by crumb, piece by piece. Until he started devouring his food, that I was shoving in his huge mouth with my red tweezers.
(By the end of it all I was already concerned that he'd gulp up the tweezers AND my hand with that dog food)))
Then I did my home work and learned on-line when they become "fledglings" and are ready to leave the nest. I was trying not to handle him too much while raising him, keeping in mind that I was planning to release him back to the wild, but apparently he still grew attached to me, so he was very shy that first day.
He didn't want to leave me and he was clinging to me, until I put him up on the tree branch. He liked that, and even climbed higher when I came back to check on him. But in couple of hours when I came back, he was already in the bushes and I saw a happy look on his face when I found him; he realized that he couldn't quite fly yet and was scared to be left there all alone. So I took him home and then brought him outside one more time later that day. This time he was already smarter and was hiding in thick bushes, observing other birds and the "life outside." And I was running around the bushes with my red tweezers like any concerned mother, making sure that he was not hungry. It reminded me of times when my own son started going to Middle school, and I was insisting on walking him there until we'd cross the busy street together.
It was going like; "Let's walk one more block and then I'll leave"
My son; "Mom, go home - other birds are watching."
Me; "Open wide - just one last piece; let's make sure you are not hungry before I'll go home."
But that night, after it started getting dark, the fledgling still wanted to go back home with me into his safe, cozy box. So he jumped on my shoulder and I carried him with me.
The next morning however, when I brought him outside, he was less hesitant and in few minutes he took off from my shoulder to the highest tree. I could see that he could already fly very well.
In three-four hours he reported back to me that he was still there, after I called his name, and the way he sounded - he was doing just fine and had no plans to join me. Then his voice slowly faded away.
I haven't heard from him since then, but I've already noticed that starlings do not congregate around my house, but in places down the road.
So I can hear them in the evening on my walks, and I am pretty sure that my little guy is among them.
It makes me happy now.
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