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Old 11-26-2017, 04:54 PM
 
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If you have a large backyard in rural America somewhere in the middle (think South or North Carolinas) of America and you have a large aviary with a dozen of birds. After having them for a year in the aviary, you let them fly free, but have shelters (aviary with open doors), breeding boxes, and food available for them 24/7. Do you think they will stick around or not fly far?
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Old 11-26-2017, 05:03 PM
 
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I wonder if that would be legal, Quaker? I really don't know.

It seems like you'll get a nonnative population of birds going that way.

Parts of Austin have a serious quaker parrot problem.
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Old 11-26-2017, 05:07 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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They might stick around, but they might also establish a feral colony right where its least wanted. This is not necessarily a good idea for the birds. Doesn't matter where you happen to live. None of those birds should be free flying in a place they don't belong to. Lots of reasons not to do this:

They may be injured or killed by avian or mammalian predators...the open aviary will attract them too
Can pick up diseases from native birds that they have no resistance to
Create a nuisance for neighbors (who may shoot or poison them)
You could be cited or fined by local authorities and held responsible for any damage
Their droppings could also spread diseases that native birds have no resistance to
They could spread nonnative seed plants to areas where they will cause other problems
The ones that chew cavity nests can damage neighbors' trees and shrubs
They could damage local fruit or grain crops
They could compete with native birds for food, water, shelter, etc.

Why do you think there are massively expensive national programs (that YOU the taxpayer pays for) to eradicate nonnative species? Because of actions like this. Just keep your nonnative birds where they belong....in a secure aviary.
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Old 11-26-2017, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Here and now.
11,908 posts, read 4,422,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quaker15 View Post
If you have a large backyard in rural America somewhere in the middle (think South or North Carolinas) of America and you have a large aviary with a dozen of birds. After having them for a year in the aviary, you let them fly free, but have shelters (aviary with open doors), breeding boxes, and food available for them 24/7. Do you think they will stick around or not fly far?
I think this is a bad idea, for the reasons already given. In addition, budgies and lovebirds are not compatible. I would try a different combination.
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Old 11-27-2017, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,377 posts, read 1,308,599 times
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Not a good idea. Not correct environment for them, not warm enough. I did read that there are some wild flocks in Florida but even then cold can kill them. Could probably get in trouble for releasing a non native species. They are not wild but could end up being so if they survive. You will never see them again.

https://www.omlet.co.uk/guide/budgie...atural_habitat
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Old 11-27-2017, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,377 posts, read 1,308,599 times
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... Also, just FYI. I had a budgie, very friendly. I ended up with what I think was a somewhat brain damaged love bird, he went through a industrial type fan..... Long story. Once the love bird recovered they were kept in the same cage and were buddies for years.
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Old 11-27-2017, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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IMHO, releasing them as suggested would be a sure death sentence for the birds. Far too many factors such as local predatory species, lack of knowledge to forage for themselves, environmental and man-made hazards, inclement weather, and the list goes on.
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Old 12-23-2017, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Southern Quebec
1,434 posts, read 1,163,586 times
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That's a very cruel thing to do.
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Old 12-23-2017, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Charlotte county, Florida
4,196 posts, read 5,673,888 times
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I believe with having no knowledge of predators or natural foraging skills most would die..

I lost my Senegal once, his wings were clipped but he somehow got away when I was cleaning his cage out in the garage.
Luckily we did find him the next day hiding in the neighbors garden, not a natural thing for a bird to do, just chill in a garden.
He was probably there all night.

He used to whistle Suzie Q from Creedence, finally found him by playing it and listening for his whistle..
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Old 12-25-2017, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Southern Quebec
1,434 posts, read 1,163,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caligula1 View Post
I believe with having no knowledge of predators or natural foraging skills most would die..

I lost my Senegal once, his wings were clipped but he somehow got away when I was cleaning his cage out in the garage.
Luckily we did find him the next day hiding in the neighbors garden, not a natural thing for a bird to do, just chill in a garden.
He was probably there all night.

He used to whistle Suzie Q from Creedence, finally found him by playing it and listening for his whistle..
I am so glad that your found your Senegal...how comical about him whistling Suzie Q. It served to bring you together again.

One of our late tiels flew out our front door once; he'd been fighting with another of our tiels. DH and I went around the block several times, calling and whistling for him. Not a peep.

We were becoming depressed and upset, and as we rounded the corner to get to our house yet again, there was Donald the tiel, crouched on a rock on our front lawn by the street, waiting for DH to pick him up!

That rogue!

Donald sadly passed away, and a few months later we rescued a disabled cockatiel who cannot fly - bad butcher job on his wings by an incompetent.

He whistles as well, as most tiels like to do, including the 'Na na na NA na!' stool-pigeon/rat whistle. I'm trying to teach him 'Whistle While You Work'. I have to do it from a distance, though as Baby is DH's bird and DH is very possessive when it comes to his tiel.

(I have a clinging vine peach-face lovebird who is bonded to me

He talks, too! We've never had a talking cockatiel until now; only one or two of our late budgies talked.

We never tried to teach him to talk; he just picked a few phrases up on his own. He has a rusty door-jamb voice. It is very clear. Budgies sound like little robots!

Baby often insists to DH that DH is 'a big baby' and 'a geek'!

Baby's real name is Dinty Moore, but we began calling him 'Baby' and the nickname has stuck.
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