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Old 06-20-2018, 05:29 PM
 
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As opposed to all in one cage.. where they bond with each other. Correct?
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Old 06-21-2018, 02:26 AM
 
Location: on the wind
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creamer1 View Post
As opposed to all in one cage.. where they bond with each other. Correct?
Not necessarily. So much depends on the type of bird, the age at which you get it, what you know about bird intelligence and behavior, how you treat it, their gender, how much the separated birds can still interact (seeing and hearing each other, cages in the same room, etc.). Not all birds can share a cage or even a room either. Birds can have preferences...just because you put birds together doesn't mean they will get along. Just because you keep a bird alone doesn't guarantee it will bond tightly with you.

Also you need to realize what "bonding" with a human keeper actually means. We can misinterpret what the bird actually needs and wants because it is lonely or frustrated. However, there is a lot of research trying to change old assumptions about all this too. A single bird in the house needs more social interaction with the next best thing....the people. If you put that same bird with others of it's own kind, they are more likely to bond with each other.

Based on your recent questions OP I really think you need to do a lot of reading about companion bird species, how they differ and what you can expect from them in terms of companionship, and learn proper techniques for living with them before you get one. Join a birdkeeping group, spend time with a local trainer/breeder, read all you can before picking one. There is a lot of information about how companion birds interact with their people, but many bird buyers don't read it. Then the bird ends up miserable, annoying all it's people, biting, screaming, being destructive to itself or the house, and floating from home to home because no one wants to deal with it. A few articles to get you started:

https://fall2016.iaabcjournal.org/human-avian-bond/

https://www.parrots.org/reference-library
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Old 06-21-2018, 07:37 AM
 
2,213 posts, read 948,129 times
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Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Not necessarily. So much depends on the type of bird, the age at which you get it, what you know about bird intelligence and behavior, how you treat it, their gender, how much the separated birds can still interact (seeing and hearing each other, cages in the same room, etc.). Not all birds can share a cage or even a room either. Birds can have preferences...just because you put birds together doesn't mean they will get along. Just because you keep a bird alone doesn't guarantee it will bond tightly with you.

Also you need to realize what "bonding" with a human keeper actually means. We can misinterpret what the bird actually needs and wants because it is lonely or frustrated. However, there is a lot of research trying to change old assumptions about all this too. A single bird in the house needs more social interaction with the next best thing....the people. If you put that same bird with others of it's own kind, they are more likely to bond with each other.

Based on your recent questions OP I really think you need to do a lot of reading about companion bird species, how they differ and what you can expect from them in terms of companionship, and learn proper techniques for living with them before you get one. Join a birdkeeping group, spend time with a local trainer/breeder, read all you can before picking one. There is a lot of information about how companion birds interact with their people, but many bird buyers don't read it. Then the bird ends up miserable, annoying all it's people, biting, screaming, being destructive to itself or the house, and floating from home to home because no one wants to deal with it. A few articles to get you started:

https://fall2016.iaabcjournal.org/human-avian-bond/

https://www.parrots.org/reference-library
Well I'm presently alternating the two between separate, together, separate, together, they can still hear each other to maybe even see each other
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Old 06-21-2018, 08:02 AM
 
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^ Thats a good read so far.. maybe Max and Bonkers can share a cage, they seem near twins.

You're saying they can bond with each other, AND the human?
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Old 06-21-2018, 10:35 AM
 
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Maybe tomorrow, I could let them fly around their room all day?
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Old 06-21-2018, 01:15 PM
 
Location: on the wind
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Originally Posted by Creamer1 View Post
^ Thats a good read so far.. maybe Max and Bonkers can share a cage, they seem near twins.

You're saying they can bond with each other, AND the human?
No, I don't think I implied that. I haven't had more than one "companion" type bird at a time, but looking back on it I regret ever keeping them that way. I don't keep single birds now for a lot of reasons. It's no longer about what I want, it's about what is best for the bird. I live alone, so when I am gone at work all day the bird would suffer. I am not a bird, so can't fulfill all the emotional needs one might have. Unless I was a very good behavioralist may not know how to give an intelligent, socially complex, long-lived bird the best quality of life. I now prefer aviary birds in stable pairs or an appropriate small flock depending on the size of living space I can provide. Sure, I teach them that I am a source of treats and food and that I am not a danger, but I don't try to be a substitute mate or flock member. I prefer giving them a more complete social life with each other and am content to observe their interactions rather than force them to rely on me for it.

So you already have two birds? Don't assume they can share space permanently. They might tolerate each other, but it could only be temporary or seasonal and the actual space they have available probably matters quite a bit. Social aggression can be subtle. They could be stressing each other out without doing anything as blatant as injuring each other. Something you don't notice could trigger aggression. You should be ready to separate them on short notice, so have a second cage handy just in case they need space from each other.

Last edited by Parnassia; 06-21-2018 at 01:27 PM..
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Old 06-21-2018, 01:25 PM
 
Location: on the wind
12,928 posts, read 6,451,593 times
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Originally Posted by Creamer1 View Post
Maybe tomorrow, I could let them fly around their room all day?
If you are going to allow them to fly free in a safe room do it on most if not every day. To do it sporadically might end up frustrating them more while they are stuck in their cage.
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