U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Birds
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 07-10-2020, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
4,532 posts, read 7,280,743 times
Reputation: 4524

Advertisements

A friend from a local zoo who knew us well had called us about some surplus Emu eggs that they had in the early 80's before the Ostrich and Emu craze that happened shortly after then.

He gave us an egg (look it up on Google to get an idea of the size) and wished us the best of luck but not much advice on how to properly incubate. We incubated for about 20 days or so, can't remember exactly. Mom decided that it was a lost cause and wanted to make space in the incubator for parrot eggs.

We placed the egg on top of the incubator thinking it was either infertile or died in the egg. There was no evidence at the time that it would hatch and we couldn't see or hear a chick due to the egg shell color.

About 10-15 minutes later the egg started to rock back and forth and we heard the chick peeping. It hatched by itself and we raised the chick to an adult bird.

Last edited by dontaskwhy; 07-10-2020 at 01:45 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-10-2020, 05:42 PM
 
2,893 posts, read 641,140 times
Reputation: 2677
Quote:
Originally Posted by dontaskwhy View Post
A friend from a local zoo who knew us well had called us about some surplus Emu eggs that they had in the early 80's before the Ostrich and Emu craze that happened shortly after then.

He gave us an egg (look it up on Google to get an idea of the size) and wished us the best of luck but not much advice on how to properly incubate. We incubated for about 20 days or so, can't remember exactly. Mom decided that it was a lost cause and wanted to make space in the incubator for parrot eggs.

We placed the egg on top of the incubator thinking it was either infertile or died in the egg. There was no evidence at the time that it would hatch and we couldn't see or hear a chick due to the egg shell color.

About 10-15 minutes later the egg started to rock back and forth and we heard the chick peeping. It hatched by itself and we raised the chick to an adult bird.
What a great story -- thanks for sharing that, Tom! Can emus be domesticated like parrots? Did your emu chick look like these?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yb2Y2rcgnCw
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2020, 06:12 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
9,253 posts, read 5,499,855 times
Reputation: 24219
Tell us more! What happened to the chick after it grew up?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2020, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
4,532 posts, read 7,280,743 times
Reputation: 4524
When the baby matured, we were able to confirm it was a male and we got him a mature female companion. Both birds were very gentle and dumb as a rock. The male was raised with baby ducklings and geese and sadly as he matured he stomped a few of them fatally. After the first attack, the ducks and geese were removed from the same environment. We also had 3 Rhea's (shorter but similar to the Emu's) in the same enclosure who were smart enough and fast enough to avoid an unfortunate accident.

Overall, the Emu's were gentle to humans. The male, who we raised took well to people and the female kept her distance. Emu's don't possess the same threat to people as Ostriches do when they kick backwards. We did have to erect a 6 foot no climb fence to prevent the Emu's from escaping. Fortunately, at the time we had a large 26 acre farm with plenty of pasture.

I don't suggest anybody to get an Emu as a pet. They are messy and can be a danger to smaller animals.

BTW: the National Geographic photo above shows to adolescent Emu's. As they mature, the light colored stripes disappear. Our nickname for the stripes was "racing stripes" as our Emu matured to an adult they faded away and blended in to the brown feathers.

We did not get any fertile eggs from the Emu's or the Rhea's.


Here are some statistics about Emu's

COMMON NAME: Common Emu

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Dromaius novaehollandiae

TYPE: Birds

DIET: Omnivore

GROUP NAME: Mob

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: 10 to 20 years

SIZE: 5.2 to 6.2 feet high

WEIGHT: 66 to 100 pounds

Last edited by dontaskwhy; 07-10-2020 at 07:00 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Birds

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top