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Old 06-19-2010, 09:58 PM
 
Location: virginia beach, virginia
122 posts, read 196,386 times
Reputation: 94

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Quote:
Originally Posted by geofra View Post
I am interested to know why you binge readers are like you are. I am a very deliberate reader. I take forever to read just one book. It's incomprehensible to me that a person can read so fast and actually understand what he is reading. How do you all do that?

I have no idea why I am the way I am when it comes to reading. I have been a reader ever since about 8 th grade. I read for fun its my thing that I love to do . As far as reading so fast I always have, In high school my lit. teachers couldn't keep me in books. I read very fast but do retain about 90 % of the information. I don't know how I do it. If I go to reread a book that I have read in the last couple months I could tell you page by page what was happening or going to happen with just a quick couple line skim. For me this type of reading comes naturally I don't know how it is for others.
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Old 06-20-2010, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
2,637 posts, read 12,590,227 times
Reputation: 3630
Quote:
It's incomprehensible to me that a person can read so fast and actually understand what he is reading. How do you all do that?
I learned to read so early that I don't remember a time when I couldn't do it. I have noticed that I read differently than other people. I don't read one word at a time, I somehow read many words all at once. I can take in sentences and sometimes even entire paragraphs at a glance. Once I am into a book, I don't even see the printed pages anymore except in some very distant way. I'm seeing the story. It's really an altered state of consciousness. I am not even aware of the passing of time and I'm always surprised when I look up and see that hours and hundreds of pages have flown by.
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Old 06-21-2010, 07:33 AM
 
Location: virginia beach, virginia
122 posts, read 196,386 times
Reputation: 94
Thumbs up Perfectly said

Quote:
Originally Posted by tilli View Post
Once I am into a book, I don't even see the printed pages anymore except in some very distant way. I'm seeing the story. It's really an altered state of consciousness. I am not even aware of the passing of time and I'm always surprised when I look up and see that hours and hundreds of pages have flown by.
Yes you said so perfectly , this is me to the t. I thought I was the only one , glad im not.
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,596 posts, read 11,414,280 times
Reputation: 9169
Default F-U-N topic: binge reading!

Binge reading, for me, starts innocently-enough with a single book, and then it's as if the OCD element of my personality takes over for awhile.

For example, I may read a novel, or nonfictional work, that sparks an interest in something related. That, in turn, piques my curiosity about something else. Having finished Nancy Horan's Loving Frank, I became curious about the other women in the architect, Frank Lloyd Wright's life, including his three wives, and possibly his own mother, sisters, and daughters. I was also intrigued by the parallels between his father's life, and the things Frank chose to do, whether he meant to emulate his father, who he claimed to despise or not. So, that led to researching Frank Lloyd Wright, and looking for biographies of the architect. He wrote his own life story which I think would be enlightening as well.

Because one of the women in his life, was a strong personality in her own right, and well ahead of the time during which she lived, I have been looking for materials on Mamah Borthwick, and the things with which she involved herself: translating the works of Scandanavian's, Ellen Key, who advocated a woman's sense of self came from more than being wife and mother -- most modern for the early 1900s. That led to wanting to learn more about the Women's Movement of the time, beyond what I knew from history classes and the like, and wanting to go back and look at the people who had been influences upon Mamah Borthwick, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

Growing up, Borthwick's home was frequented by the likes of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Carl Sandburg, and others; Frank's mother often read to him from Emerson. Because Wright's mother's family were Welsh, and gave Welsh names to their homes and family homesteads, that sparked an interest in Welsh folktales and stories and history; like Wright's home and studio in Spring Green, Wisconsin, being called Taleisen.

I get on kicks like this, and go off on tangents, as the expressions go, often, one thing leading into another, and another, and another. Sometimes, it may even start with a movie -- like Johnny Depp's The Libertine -- which started a binge, reading about the actual Lord upon whom the movie was based, and that led to reading about Charles II and his time period (of which I knew little in spite of teaching British Lit to HS SRs), which included side trips into the theater, actors and actresses, and their formal training. . .

You get the picture.
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,596 posts, read 11,414,280 times
Reputation: 9169
Quote:
Originally Posted by geofra View Post
I am interested to know why you binge readers are like you are. I am a very deliberate reader. I take forever to read just one book. It's incomprehensible to me that a person can read so fast and actually understand what he is reading. How do you all do that?
I've always been that way.

I recall the one time in my life that my Father treated one of my teachers as if she was an absolute idiot. For him, a teacher was on a pedestal, and if she told us the sky was green, for that day, it was.

My 6th grade teacher, however, during a conference told Dad I read too fast. In trying to understand what she was sharing, he asked some fairly pointed questions, like "Does she understand what she reads?" "Oh, yes," Mrs. S. replied. "Does she pick up on the nuances, and subtleties of the work?," Dad asked. I'm not sure Mrs. S understood the question, or answered. Towards the end of the discussion, Dad says, "I don't see what the problem is," to which she explained, "Well, she's finished before the other children."

"Is she a problem?," he asked. "Is she disturbing others? Out of her seat?"

"No. She'll sit and draw, or read another book."

Knowing my Dad, I sensed he was perplexed, and close to losing his patience. I felt exonerated as I had been trying to tell him how stupid my teacher was this particular year -- none of which my father would entertain, or condone, ex-Marine Corps drill sergeant Dad. But, he sat there that day, shook his head, and repeated, "I don't see a problem, Mrs. S."

Leaving the schools grounds, Dad turns to me and says, "Sorry, Honey. You're right. Your teacher is an i-d-i-o-t." Bless her heart, as we Southerners, say, but I liked her in spite of herself. I just made it a point to check-out at least 2-3 books for every one she had us read.
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Old 06-21-2010, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
3,088 posts, read 5,330,600 times
Reputation: 1620
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Who here is a binge reader and why are we like that?

Sometimes I can read 5 - 7 books, one right after the other, sometimes with staying up to early hours of the morning to finish the current book and then after the reading binge of multiple books is over, not have the desire to read a new book for a month.

Is it something in our personality, is it a time thing or is it as simple as the way we acquire the books. You know if we buy 5 - 7 books at a clip or take 5 - 7 books out of the library at a clip, then we binge read whereas the person who picks up/buys books onesy-twosy is less likely to binge read.

I can say that being in a book discussion group somewhat moderates the binge reading because I can't read a selected book for discussion during Week 1 and expect to remember it after 5 - 6 more books in quick succession after reading it but before the next meet-up.
I did that when I was a kid. . . .no TV, no radio, no (structured) activities. . . .reading was my entertainment. . . .I am hoping that in retierment (2 more months, and counting) I can return to that mode, at least occasionally.
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:30 PM
 
5,250 posts, read 4,640,657 times
Reputation: 17351
I was talking to a friend the other day about reading, he stated that he couldn't read very well therefore he shunned books unless they were manuals that pertained to some of his hobbies. This got me to thinking about my own life long ability to read, is it just a quirk that some can read very fast with good retention and others seem to be bogged down by it all? I'm inclined to think that we who read a lot have some innate abilities in that regard and can't know the feeling of struggling to digest a small book. Reading to me is like riding on the proverbial "magic carpet", I'm totally into the scenes conjured in my mind, whizzing down seacoast highways, or hanging on for dear life on the raft Kon- Tiki with Thor Heyerdahl.

On binge reading I can only say that I've been on that binge from the elementary years in school. I used to read a few books at a time and still do that but I feel I'm slowing down somewhat at sixty plus. Larry McMurtry author of Walter Benjamin at The Dairy Queen, the best book to date on the subject of books, in my opinion, in that book McMurtry explained his own love of books as something that sustained him throughout his childhood and on past sixty years of age, he wrote of the wonderful freedom of the storyteller to twist things where it was called for, to add something of the unusual to hook the readers imagination, forcing him to keep reading far into the night. The reader in turn can ramp up his thirst for more reading when an author shows the ability to flatten out the bumps in his writing, paving the way for some real speed without losing the quality of the storytelling. I guess we read a lot because we can......
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Old 06-22-2010, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
2,637 posts, read 12,590,227 times
Reputation: 3630
Quote:
My 6th grade teacher, however, during a conference told Dad I read too fast. In trying to understand what she was sharing, he asked some fairly pointed questions, like "Does she understand what she reads?" "Oh, yes," Mrs. S. replied. "Does she pick up on the nuances, and subtleties of the work?," Dad asked. I'm not sure Mrs. S understood the question, or answered. Towards the end of the discussion, Dad says, "I don't see what the problem is," to which she explained, "Well, she's finished before the other children."
I also got in trouble for reading too fast, doing my homework before class was over, etc. Although I was never disruptive and would simply switch to reading a book for pleasure or to my next period's textbook, they just hated that I read so fast. They seemed to want all the students in a neat little featureless blob, all on the same track, at the same speed, in all subjects - a ridiculous and unrealistic desire.

They would try to make an example of me by ridiculing me to the other students, claiming I was just trying to show off and couldn't really read that fast. They would attempt to prove this by quizzing me in front of the class, and then would become extremely flustered when they realized that I had indeed absorbed all the information in the assigned reading. Some of them would not let me read my own book and would make me just sit there staring at the clock. One sent home a note saying that my personal reading was "too advanced" since I was reading adult works in early elementary school and they insisted that I couldn't possibly handle the adult themes. I can still remember my dad rolling his eyes at that note. There was no way in hell that my parents would force me to read boring crap far below my reading level.

One teacher actually sent me to the principal for the terrible offense of reading. Even though (or perhaps, because) I had completed all my assignments and was still far ahead of the rest of the class. I was doing nothing more terrible than quietly reading while I waited for the class to finish. The principal was completely puzzled by this and told me to just hang out in the waiting room until the bell, and that I was welcome to read if I wanted to. So I did.

All these years later, I still don't understand this attitude from someone who is supposed to be an educator. Somehow my reading was personally threatening to several teachers. I am so glad that I am now out of the reach of small-minded people like that.
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Old 06-22-2010, 05:05 PM
 
178 posts, read 100,705 times
Reputation: 48
I can't not read. I have to have something to read its my only outlet of sanity anymore. Right now I am reading a book by Patrick Buchanan but I just finished a book called Enemy Combatant that everyone should read.
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Old 06-23-2010, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Kauai, HI
1,055 posts, read 4,446,214 times
Reputation: 906
I am a really fast reader and then read massive amounts of books at a time. My life is pretty much based around my reading habits...on my off days I always go to the beach to read and sometimes go before work. I have been doing this for 3 years straight and haven't gotten sick of it yet! When the book is really good, I will take it to work and read it there!

Recently, I got sucked into the Sookie Stackhouse novels and would read one after another in quick succession. It was easy as the books aren't a tough read but because there were 10 of them, it took a bit of time. By the end, I thought I was practically living in Bon Temps. I seriously needed a reality check.
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