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Old 06-23-2010, 06:14 PM
 
1,034 posts, read 1,790,680 times
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The Sookie Stackhouse novels are a lot of fun. It's actually better if you can read them one after the other. I just finished the last one, and during the first chapter I was lost, because I had read the previous book the year before when it came out. I had to get it out and skim through the last chapter to get my bearings.

When I had more time to myself I'd often stack up a pile next to the most comfortable chair in the house and start with the top book, working down the stack. It wasn't unusual for me to finish 2 books in a day, 3 or more if one or more were photographic, art or architectural books.....lots of pictures.
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Old 06-25-2010, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Missouri
4,272 posts, read 3,770,499 times
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It seems as if fast reading is an innate ability. Only if it could be taught.
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Old 06-25-2010, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
37,729 posts, read 40,764,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geofra View Post
I am interested to know why you binge readers are like you are. I am a very deliberate reader. I take forever to read just one book. It's incomprehensible to me that a person can read so fast and actually understand what he is reading. How do you all do that?
I chalk mine up to my buying habits. I order my nonfiction books online so if 6 come at a time I tend to read them one after another. The political ones or current event ones tend to get dated fairly quickly so I'm bound to read them as soon as they arrive, the order is my only decision. But then, I can go three weeks without reading anything until I place my next order.

The only thing that slows me down, while I read, is my nonfiction book discussion group required reading. Because some of them are books I would never in a million years choose on my own, it takes me longer to get through them. I hate autobiographies followed by biographies. It takes me a long time to wade through them especially if I know the writer is deliberately omitting stuff or glossing over it to prop up the subject of the bio. Also, some of those people think every little "nugget" about themselves is of interest to a reader because they think so much of themselves. In the next three months I have a biography and an autobiography, I have to read. UGH.
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Old 06-25-2010, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,596 posts, read 11,413,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
. . . Reading to me is like riding on the proverbial "magic carpet", I'm totally into the scenes conjured in my mind, whizzing down seacoast highways, or hanging on for dear life on the raft Kon- Tiki with Thor Heyerdahl.

. . . something that sustained him throughout his childhood . . .

My childhood was difficult, and books were a means of escape. I can remember as a tiny thing, sitting with titles from the Little Golden Books series in my lap, and struggling to decipher the words. If all else failed, I could make-up stories to accompany the illustrations.

Reading could take me away, often to worlds I knew I may never have a chance to visit. I would love to insert myself into the story, becoming the protagonist, and setting forth on an adventure, or solving a mystery, or falling in love. Nothing could compare.

I've never understood people who have never had such an experience, and used to tell my HS students reading was like tv in your head, only BETTER because you were the director and producer, set designer, and could play any of the parts of the characters if you wanted.
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Old 06-25-2010, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,596 posts, read 11,413,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tilli View Post
I also got in trouble for reading too fast, doing my homework before class was over, etc. Although I was never disruptive and would simply switch to reading a book for pleasure or to my next period's textbook, they just hated that I read so fast. They seemed to want all the students in a neat little featureless blob, all on the same track, at the same speed, in all subjects - a ridiculous and unrealistic desire.

They would try to make an example of me by ridiculing me to the other students, claiming I was just trying to show off and couldn't really read that fast. They would attempt to prove this by quizzing me in front of the class, and then would become extremely flustered when they realized that I had indeed absorbed all the information in the assigned reading. Some of them would not let me read my own book and would make me just sit there staring at the clock. One sent home a note saying that my personal reading was "too advanced" since I was reading adult works in early elementary school and they insisted that I couldn't possibly handle the adult themes. I can still remember my dad rolling his eyes at that note. There was no way in hell that my parents would force me to read boring crap far below my reading level.

One teacher actually sent me to the principal for the terrible offense of reading. Even though (or perhaps, because) I had completed all my assignments and was still far ahead of the rest of the class. I was doing nothing more terrible than quietly reading while I waited for the class to finish. The principal was completely puzzled by this and told me to just hang out in the waiting room until the bell, and that I was welcome to read if I wanted to. So I did.

All these years later, I still don't understand this attitude from someone who is supposed to be an educator. Somehow my reading was personally threatening to several teachers. I am so glad that I am now out of the reach of small-minded people like that.
You HAVE to wonder, don't you? Sheesh, but I cannot imagine setting out to destroy a child's love of reading. I used to have to find ways to help parents encourage their children to read -- if only cereal boxes, to start.
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Old 06-27-2010, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
6,588 posts, read 17,488,922 times
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I don't binge as a rule, but there have been a couple of times...

The first one was over ten years ago when I discovered the Anita Blake books by Laurell K. Hamilton. This is before the series went in a bad direction, so I was able to devour ten books in about a week!

The second one was a few years ago when a friend loaned me the Stephanie Plum books by Janet Evanovich. I devoured those as well, up through the tenth book if I recall. (That would mean it was about six years ago, because "Sizzling Sixteen" was released just a few days ago.)

Apparently I only "binge" if someone loans me the books for a series I'm discovering. I guess I'm also a fast reader, too!
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Old 06-30-2010, 02:01 AM
 
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I love to read, and when I have a book in hand, I’m usually oblivious to the world. I am a constant binge reader and keep a stack of books by my bedside so that I can concentrate on getting the rest of my work done and ONLY then pick up one book…leading to another…and another.
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Old 07-04-2010, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Mesa, AZ
489 posts, read 1,320,020 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Who here is a binge reader and why are we like that?

Sometimes I can read 5 - 7 books, one right after the other, sometimes with staying up to early hours of the morning to finish the current book and then after the reading binge of multiple books is over, not have the desire to read a new book for a month.

Is it something in our personality, is it a time thing or is it as simple as the way we acquire the books. You know if we buy 5 - 7 books at a clip or take 5 - 7 books out of the library at a clip, then we binge read whereas the person who picks up/buys books onesy-twosy is less likely to binge read.

I can say that being in a book discussion group somewhat moderates the binge reading because I can't read a selected book for discussion during Week 1 and expect to remember it after 5 - 6 more books in quick succession after reading it but before the next meet-up.
I am definitely a binge reader. I will read 4-10 books back to back and very quickly, and then I wont read any books for at least a few months. Not sure why I do this though.
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Old 07-07-2010, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,596 posts, read 11,413,051 times
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I seem to be done with this last binge, that started with Nancy Horan's Loving Frank, and led me to TC Boyle's The Women. Because I found the architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, fascinating, I dragged our books of his work off our own shelves again -- to look at his buildings and the plans. (My favorites in our personal stash have to be the two 3-D pop-up books.) That led to a trip to the public library where I checked-out every biography of Wright available on the shelves.

The only thing, now, that I would like to find is Wright's own autobiography. NetFlix had several documentaries, one of which featured a young Mike Wallace discussing American style and design with the Master. The words that came to mind, viewing the interview, were 'arrogant,' but perhaps rightly so, and that old-fashioned expression, 'a dandy.'
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Old 07-07-2010, 08:28 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,490,742 times
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I believe any activity that becomes compulsive indicates a need to escape the present moment. Regardless of the activity, I think if I were driven to it, I would have to ask myself -- what is this keeping me from doing that I do not want to do. It's an opportunity to know myself better.
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