U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-15-2007, 02:39 AM
 
Location: London, England
15 posts, read 74,200 times
Reputation: 30

Advertisements

This was written by my Great Grandfather in 1892.


Ashingto Village

The sun has seldom turned his face
To smile upon a lovelier place.
Than Ashington Village so fair and dry
That fronts the south and western sky.

The trees in wild luxuriance grow
And pure the ev'ning breezes blow,
The landscape round is fair to see
The parsonage and chestnut tree;

The blacksmiths shop,the parish pound,
The windmill whirling round and round,
The flowing brook, the trickling rills,
The cottages and towering hills.

That many a ridge and peak display,
And in the distance die away,
sure never yet did jackdaw perch
Upon a prettier parish church,

Than that whose glittering spire is seen
Right opposite the village green,
And twittering birds at early morn,
Skim round the cot where I was born.

By James Town 1836-1912

Last edited by oldgattonian; 11-15-2007 at 02:53 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-15-2007, 02:50 AM
 
1,727 posts, read 1,566,721 times
Reputation: 388
Wow, I love all of these poems. I'll have to read this thread more closely.

I read "The Road not Taken" at my grandfather's funeral - it was his favorite poem.

Stopping by the Woods ... the censorship thing is insane! For what it's worth, I think there has been new scholarship on this poem - it used to be thought of a death wish (last stanzas); now I guess it's thought of as more life affirming.

I love "When you are Old" by W.B. Yeats.

I also love T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Dylan Thomas.

And yes (sob) things like the Rainbow Bridge and the one about "I did not die". I collected all of those when my beloved pet died.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2007, 02:51 AM
 
1,727 posts, read 1,566,721 times
Reputation: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgattonian View Post
This was written by my Grandfather in 1892.


Ashingto Village

The sun has seldom turned his face
To smile upon a lovelier place.
Than Ashington Village so fair and dry
That fronts the south and western sky.

The trees in wild luxuriance grow
And pure the ev'ning breezes blow,
The landscape round is fair to see
The parsonage and chestnut tree;

[The blacksmiths shop,the parish pound,
The windmill whirling round and round,
The flowing brook, the trickling rills,
The cottages and towering hills.

That many a ridge and peak display,
And in the distance die away,
sure never yet did jackdaw perch
Upon a prettier parish church,

Than that whose glittering spire is seen
Right opposite the village green,
And twittering birds at early morn,
Skim round the cot where I was born.

By James Town 1836-1912
... beautiful poem ...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2007, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Corvallis, OR
146 posts, read 763,566 times
Reputation: 68
Alright, my all-time favorite poet is probably Charles Bukowski.

8 Count - Bukowski
[SIZE=3] from my bed
I watch
3 birds
on a telephone
wire.
one flies
off.
then
another.
one is left,
then
it too
is gone.
my typewriter is
tombstone
still.
and I am
reduced to bird
watching.
just thought I'd
let you
know,
****er.
[/SIZE]

Emily Dickinson - Death:
Because I could not stop for Death—
He kindly stopped for me—
The Carriage held but just Ourselves—
And Immortality.
We slowly drove—He knew no haste
And I had put away
My labor and my leisure too,
For His Civility—
We passed the School, where Children strove
At Recess—in the Ring—
We passed the fields of Gazing Grain—
We passed the Setting Sun—
Or rather—He passed Us—
The Dews drew quivering and chill—
For only Gossamer, my Gown—
My Tippet—only Tulle—
We paused before a House that seemed
A Swelling of the Ground—
The Roof was scarcely visible—
The Cornice—in the Ground—
Since then—'tis Centuries—and yet
Feels shorter than the Day
I first surmised the Horses' Heads
Were toward Eternity—
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2007, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Who knows
2,355 posts, read 2,030,151 times
Reputation: 1197
I too love "When You Are Old" by Yeats...it's beautiful. But my favorite poem is the one I used at my wedding this past March; the poet is Pablo Neruda.

Sonnet 17”

“I don't love you as if you were the salt-rose, topaz or arrow of carnations that propagate fire: I love you as certain dark things are loved, secretly, between the shadow and the soul. I love you as the plant that doesn't bloom, and carries hidden within itself the light of those flowers, and thanks to your love, darkly in my body lives the dense fragrance that rises from the earth. I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where, I love you simply, without problems or pride: I love you in this way because I know no other way of loving but this, in which there is no I or you; so intimate that your hand upon my chest is my hand, so intimate that when I fall asleep it is your eyes that close.”

*sigh*
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-15-2007, 09:38 AM
 
3,698 posts, read 10,461,823 times
Reputation: 2617
Facing west from California's shores,
Inquiring, tireless, seeking what is yet unfound,
I, a child, very old, over waves, towards the house of maternity, the land of migrations, look afar,
Look off the shores of my Western sea, the circle almost circled;
For starting westward from Hindustan, from the vales of Kashmere,
From Asia, from the north, from the God, the sage, and the hero,
From the south, from the flowery peninsulas and the spice islands,
Long having wander'd since, round the earth having wander'd,
Now I face home again, very pleas'd and joyous,
(But where is what I started for so long ago? And why is it yet unfound?)
Walt Whitman
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2007, 04:33 AM
 
1,727 posts, read 1,566,721 times
Reputation: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean98125 View Post
Facing west from California's shores,
Inquiring, tireless, seeking what is yet unfound,
I, a child, very old, over waves, towards the house of maternity, the land of migrations, look afar,
Look off the shores of my Western sea, the circle almost circled;
For starting westward from Hindustan, from the vales of Kashmere,
From Asia, from the north, from the God, the sage, and the hero,
From the south, from the flowery peninsulas and the spice islands,
Long having wander'd since, round the earth having wander'd,
Now I face home again, very pleas'd and joyous,
(But where is what I started for so long ago? And why is it yet unfound?)
Walt Whitman
Yes, and then there is "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking". Sorry everyone, my cut and paste function isn't cooperating. I love this thread.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2007, 04:18 AM
 
Location: Rochester Hills, MI
578 posts, read 2,383,256 times
Reputation: 341
THIS IS THE ONE THAT GOT ME THRU TOUGH TIMES,
INVICTUS (latin for 'unconquered') Maybe I'm cornball, but it still gives me goose bumps, I guess ya had to be there, eh? fuggetaboudit!!!

William Ernest Henley. 1849–1903

INVICTUS

Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2007, 04:27 AM
 
Location: Rochester Hills, MI
578 posts, read 2,383,256 times
Reputation: 341
Steve-O...I loved that you mentioned it being a plaque on grandma's wall during your childhood. I believe that is how I came to love reading poetry, and interested in W.E.Henley; the last lines of "Invictus" were good at getting thru turmoil & traumatic times; as a kid I would ask how come he misspelled the word "strait"....not knowing the King's English of the author's times...and that helped a little kid get into Poetry. It gave me fortitude when all around me kept insisting Oh, I'm Powerless, I"m weak! I LOVE THIS FOREVER.

IT MATTERS NOT HOW STRAIT THE GATE,
HOW CHARGED WITH PUNISHMENTS THE SCROLL,
I AM THE MASTER OF MY FATE, I AM THE CAPTAIN OF MY SOUL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2007, 10:46 AM
 
1,727 posts, read 1,566,721 times
Reputation: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeleenieWeenie View Post
I AM THE MASTER OF MY FATE, I AM THE CAPTAIN OF MY SOUL.
***love this line***
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top