U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-15-2007, 11:21 AM
 
240 posts, read 383,323 times
Reputation: 83

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
One Christmas during the American Civil War, Henry W Longfellow wrote this poem to express his dispair. Since it is once again Christmas and once again we are fighting and dying in a Civil War--it seems timely. The power of his words and the transparency of his emotion deserves to be re read as more than a Christmas Carol.

"I heard the bells on Christmas day
Their old familiar carols play,
And wild and sweet the words repeat
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

And thought how, as the day had come,
The belfries of all Christendom
Had rolled along the unbroken song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

Till ringing, singing on its way
The world revolved from night to day,
A voice, a chime, a chant sublime
Of peace on earth, good will to men.

And in despair I bowed my head
“There is no peace on earth,” I said,
“For hate is strong and mocks the song
Of peace on earth, good will to men.”

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:
“God is not dead, nor doth He sleep;
The wrong shall fail, the right prevail
With peace on earth, good will to men.”

Great poems move me to tears.....I am crying now.
It's message is that there is always hope. Nice message
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-15-2007, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,597 posts, read 10,659,350 times
Reputation: 9140
Default all of these are beautiful

I have asked my husband to put on a tombstone, a poem of Christina Rossetti's that I read in a college poetry class.


When I am gone, my dearest, sing no sad songs for me. . .



There are too many poems -- of all kinds, I think, for me to pick a favorite.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2007, 04:54 AM
 
240 posts, read 383,323 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Some great poems guys!!! Keep em comin!

I dont have any specific poems I enjoy. But I do love this little phrase/sentence/etc that my grandmother used to have on her wall. It was a sepia drawing of a horse-drawn sleigh at night, traversing through the barren woods with a full moon (reminded me of a scene from Sleepy Hollow). Underneath the drawing was the following:

The woods are lovely, dark and deep
But I have promises to keep
And miles to go before I sleep

I would stare at that for hours and get lost in the moment. Im cheesy, I know.
Hey steve-o, read post # 4, you gonna love it. It was posted by leavingcali.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2007, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
40,138 posts, read 19,530,874 times
Reputation: 46800
Default Stopping By Poem on a ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by bingo08 View Post
Hey steve-o, read post # 4, you gonna love it. It was posted by leavingcali.
The poster #4 took the last stanza to be about death or suicide. I have never felt those emotions in connection with this poem (one of my favorites too); I always associate it with the onward press of life and the need to fulfill our duties and responsibilities....that life is like a river and altho we "live in the moment" we can't hold that moment...but have to stop "and smell the roses" (now I am being cheezy) and then move on. Its interesting to contrast the reaction of his little horse who gives his harness bells a shake and can't figure out why they would stop as opposed to the sentient being who is profoundly moved by the beauty and the stillness....and who in that moment owns the scene...even more than the one in the village who holds the deed to it. That adds a nice dimension about what do we really "own".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2007, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
40,138 posts, read 19,530,874 times
Reputation: 46800
Back in 1958, my English teacher Miss Hildebrandt, made us memorize the prologue from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and we each had to stand before the class and recite it. Now 50 years later most of it is a hodge-podge in my mind....but not one spring has passed in all the intervening years that I don't run it thru my mind and not one spring has passed in those 50 years that I haven't thanked that stern but dear teacher for the blessing of poetry.

Whan that Aprille with his shoures swete
Inspired hath in every holt and heathe
The tendre croppes
and the younge son hath in the Ram
his halfe cours y runne........

And smalle foule makin melode
And sleepen all the nicht with open eye....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2007, 08:36 PM
 
2,359 posts, read 8,353,297 times
Reputation: 1108
Quote:
Originally Posted by bingo08 View Post
Wow, some poem. Does the end mean he had hung himself?
Think of the deeper meaning...

Hint: John of the Cross is a "Saint".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2007, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
40,138 posts, read 19,530,874 times
Reputation: 46800
Oh I see I was mixed up; I thought Bingo was talking about the ending of the frost poem and I didnt get the suicide part.....now I see it was the ST John of the Cross poem--I got mixed up. Sorry about that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2007, 07:24 PM
 
240 posts, read 383,323 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
The poster #4 took the last stanza to be about death or suicide. I have never felt those emotions in connection with this poem (one of my favorites too); I always associate it with the onward press of life and the need to fulfill our duties and responsibilities....that life is like a river and altho we "live in the moment" we can't hold that moment...but have to stop "and smell the roses" (now I am being cheezy) and then move on. Its interesting to contrast the reaction of his little horse who gives his harness bells a shake and can't figure out why they would stop as opposed to the sentient being who is profoundly moved by the beauty and the stillness....and who in that moment owns the scene...even more than the one in the village who holds the deed to it. That adds a nice dimension about what do we really "own".
I thought the same thing when I read it. I like the way you described it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2008, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,772 posts, read 17,394,744 times
Reputation: 9354
I'm not a big poetry fan, but I fondly remember from my grade school days, this Walt Whitman poem written in response to the assassination of Abraham Lincoln just as the Civil War was coming to an end.

O Captain My Captain

This was released as a song, but it really is pure poetry at its essence: Imagine (http://kids.niehs.nih.gov/lyrics/imagine.htm - broken link) by John Lennon

blessings....Frank
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2008, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Pocono Mts.
9,483 posts, read 11,212,965 times
Reputation: 11422
This is one of my fav's, written by Carol Hillestad

All the water
that ever was
is now.

Spring's green sap,
Prehistoric rain,
The snows of Kilimanjaro.
The blood that coursed
through T-rex,
Your baby's tears.

All the same
wet
life
slipping
down the eons.

To us,
Who make rivers burn,
fishless, thick, and yellow.

All the water
that ever was
is now.
In your eyes,
mouth,
body,
breath.
Cup your hands,
pass it on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:59 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top