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Old 09-06-2013, 03:38 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770

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I just finished Jo Nesbo's "The Redbreast" and recommend it for those that enjoy crime drama. It turned out to be one of those rare books that half-way into I couldn't not read and even took it to bed with me. (Very rare, indeed!) The last 100 pages gripped me totally.

Harry Hole, Inspector Detective for the Oslo police is a well-fleshed out protagonist with all the foibles that make him love-able. I am going to miss him while I wait for the first in this series ("The Bat") to come available at our library.
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Old 09-06-2013, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
1,013 posts, read 1,420,963 times
Reputation: 1276
I liked the Jo Nesbo that I have read.
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Old 09-06-2013, 06:33 PM
 
218 posts, read 544,218 times
Reputation: 327
My last week has been pretty harrowing. Went from being able to read a book a day not even being able to read a page. Had a 65 hour work week and the week also started out with a cracked water line which had to be replaced. Have to say - I really appreciate the simplicity of running water, especially after not having it for 5 days. I am so very tired, BUT still want to read!! ; )))) Must find something for the weekend.

Bought Dan Brown's Inferno for my Kindle the day it came out but have a mental block for this one. Not sure why. Can't bring myself to read it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
That is an expensive paperback. I just bought it anyway.
.....you're not kidding. $26.43? It's why I love the library and e-books : O Sounds interesting, tho'!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Downloaded Trail of the Spellmans by Liza Lutz to the Kindle. Certainly not a deep read, but light and entertaining. It's the 5th in a series about a family of private detectives.
I'm going to have to add this series to my TRL. TY!

Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
I have really enjoyed being a part of this group and learning about new books that I may never have read without your input. Yes we are all different but many times it opens new reading horizons for us
I couldn't agree more! : ) Enjoy your time in Florida!

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottinpdx View Post
I am reading "Surviving Home" by A. American. It's about survival after society collapses.
Saw this and it piqued my interest. I'm a fan of dystopian lit. I just DL'ed the first one in the series from Amazon. Will be my weekend read. Thks! I'm sure I'll pass it on the recommendation to my Dad as well.

Started reading and it already seems so familiar - guess b/c I've driven by so many of the landmarks mentioned in the first 30 pages. Feel like I'm walking the roads with Morgan.

Have a good reading weekend, everyone! Just reading your posts have broadened my reading horizons. tytytyty!

Last edited by OcalaLiving; 09-06-2013 at 06:59 PM..
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Utah
1,458 posts, read 4,131,378 times
Reputation: 1548
Is anyone reading And the Mountains Echoed?? (sorry, I haven't read previous pages)
Hossieni's new book is just as good as the others...I'm about half done & think I'm going to turn back & start again at the begining to make sure I didn't miss anything. And then I'm going to pull Suns & Kiterunner off the shelf & read them again too!
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Old 09-08-2013, 10:02 PM
 
12,270 posts, read 11,326,320 times
Reputation: 8066
I'm just finishing up Ash by James Herbert. It's supposed to be "a powerfully disturbing read" "guranteed to give you nightmares".

It's a 692 page leisurely trek into a Scottish castle full of rats and spiders and bats and people who aren't what they seem, but you see every surprise or thrill coming a mile away. It's a well written book, tells a decent story and the author juggles a lot of balls and most land quite neatly, but if you want truly scary horror read something like Summer of Night by Dan Simmons or even The Ceremonies by T.E.D. Klein
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Old 09-09-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
"The Crying of Lot 49" by Thomas Pynchon. It's on the Time Magazine list of 100 greatest books, and doesn't belong there. It's so 1965, the humor is sadly dated, there is no sublety at all to the impossibly slapstick scenes. No matter how brilliantly imaginative they are, and they are. Pynchon is still readable, but this book is simply too overboard. I tried to read "Catch 22" a couple years ago, and quit about a quarter of the way through for the same reason. And I couldn't get past page ten, trying to reread Kerouac's "On the Road". (Both of which are also on the Time 100)

Titles like these might appeal to younger readers who were not a part of that generation, but for us who were there, rereading them is simply dreadful, compared to the very, very fine work coming out of excellent and mature authors nowadays. The fact that a book was socially or politically important in its time does not by itself make it great literature in another time.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-09-2013 at 12:12 PM..
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Old 09-09-2013, 12:19 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Titles like these might appeal to younger readers who were not a part of that generation, but for us who were there, rereading them is simply dreadful, compared to the very, very fine work coming out of excellent and mature authors nowadays. The fact that a book was socially or politically important in its time does not by itself make it great literature in another time.
While you are a generation ahead of me, I agree that looking back to what I thought at the time was thoughtful and provoking now seems naive and embarrassing. Frankly, though, I couldn't read "Catch-22" at the time. I was too frustrated by it, though I no longer recall the specifics of why.
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Old 09-10-2013, 08:26 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Pretty much out of free stuff to read until I go to the library, so I picked up Vanity Fair, which has been sitting on the shelf forever. We'll see.

Speaking of library stuff, I finally got around to figuring out how to borrow books from the library for the Kindle and the selection is very limited--mostly romances and crime fiction. The things that look interesting I've already read. I'm envious of those of you who have huge selections at your fingertips.
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Old 09-10-2013, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV, U.S.A.
11,479 posts, read 9,139,402 times
Reputation: 19660
Echo Burning, Lee Child, Jack Reacher #5.
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Old 09-10-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
I don't normally read YA type books but due to some craziness on this end, I ended up reading Gateways by Jessica Schaub. I read it as a Kindle book. The book describes itself as a cross between The Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter or something like that. I would not put it into those lofty categories but it was an okay book. I think I would really have enjoyed it as a kid and I would recommend it for kids in the aged 10 - 12 range, particularly girls.

The thing that was aggravating is that the font style completely changed in a lot of paragraphs in the book, and either it was a typo, which is aggravating enough, or the writer didn't know the difference between "parents" and "parent's." The fact that the story was interesting enough for me to look past that and continue reading speaks to the quality of the story.

Then I discovered The Book of Joby by Mark J. Ferrari on a best fantasy books website. So I have downloaded a sample and while I haven't finished the sample, it seems to me that I will probably buy the book. ( I never knew about the sample thing available on Kindle until someone on here mentioned it in a post. It would have saved me buying some real stinkers if I had known I could do that.)
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