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Old 12-07-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Indiana (USA)
74,112 posts, read 1,835,618 times
Reputation: 3167

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Just started Storm Front by John Sandford
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Old 12-07-2013, 08:21 PM
 
Location: In the realm of possiblities
2,707 posts, read 2,836,930 times
Reputation: 3280
I'm about one quarter of the way through " California and Oregon Trail" by Francis Parkman Jr. It is a story of a group of adventurers traveling across the western frontier in 1846. The prose in the writing style is very unique. Also, it is a cloth bound book. My favorite.

Some I have recently finished :

"Two years Residence on the English Prairie of Illinois". This is a reprint by Lakeside Press 1968 of John Wood's trip from Baltimore to Illinois in 1820-1822, and his observations about the land, and the people.

"My experiences in the West" by John S. Collins. Mr. Collins was a merchant, and saddle maker in Omaha Nebraska in 1864 who trekked all the way to the Snake River Valley of Idaho, then through Montana, the Dakotas, and back finally to Souix City Iowa. A fascinating account of his travels.

" John D. Young, and the Colorado Gold Rush" by John D. Young. This is the the experiences of Mr. Young's travels from Chicago, across Missouri, and finally Denver in his quest for gold in 1860. All three of these books were reprints through The Lakeside Press of the original accounts of these adventurers.

" The Growing Season" by Samuel Hynes. This is an account of Mr. Hynes' journey from childhood into manhood. A very poignant description also of life in the U.S. before WWII.
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Old 12-08-2013, 04:52 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,349,261 times
Reputation: 1795
I finally finished The Fault in Our Stars. It took me quite awhile to read the final 30% of the book due to all the emotions. I could only read a few pages at a time before I had to set it aside. Powerful book. I'm so glad I read it. But the question is...what does one read after that? Decided to charge the Kindle so I can savor it for an hour or two.
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Old 12-09-2013, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,143 posts, read 10,706,529 times
Reputation: 9799
Just started reading The Passage by Justin Cronin. For some reason around this time of year I like to read post-apocalyptic fiction such as The Stand or Terry Brooks Shannara series. So far, The Passage is shaping up fairly well, it's already grabbed my attention to the point that I stayed up way too late reading last night.
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Old 12-09-2013, 08:32 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Just finished Barbara Kingsolver's "Animal Dreams." I cried at the ending. It was a heart-wrenchingly beautiful story of everything important. I love this author.

Next up: (another favorite author) T.C. Boyle's "East Is East"
Animal Dreams was the first Barbara Kingsolver book I read and made me a lifetime fan. I like T.C. Boyle too, but he's sometimes a little intense for me. I'm thinking about Tortilla Curtain when I say that.

Let us know about East is East.
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Old 12-09-2013, 09:29 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Animal Dreams was the first Barbara Kingsolver book I read and made me a lifetime fan. I like T.C. Boyle too, but he's sometimes a little intense for me. I'm thinking about Tortilla Curtain when I say that.

Let us know about East is East.
Tortilla Curtain was one of those books that I just can't ever get out of my mind. In a good, and not-so-good, way...
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Old 12-09-2013, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
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Finished Charles Portis "The Dog of the South", which I liked a lot, although it started to wear thin about half way through. But it's one of the few books I've ever read n which I liked the ending.

Started Ninni Holmqvist's "The Unit", which I am not liking and will probably not finish it. I have a strong sense that I've read it before, but I'm 100 pages in and still not really sure, so if I've read it before, it didn't make much of an impression on me then, either.

Last edited by jtur88; 12-09-2013 at 11:11 AM..
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Old 12-09-2013, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
Reputation: 3809
I started Boyle's When The Killings Done but didn't finish it. After reading Loving Frank by Nancy Horan, I might try Boyle's The Women. My favorite architect's love life is fascinating.
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Old 12-09-2013, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
I finished Buried in the Sky about the disaster on K2. Worth reading if you like Into Thin Air. The only trouble I had with it is that we are having -40 temperatures and when you read a book where the weather is cold, I felt I couldn't get warm.

And then in that weird internet way, one thing I was researching on the internet led to another, and I ended up reading Return From Tomorrow by George C. Ritchie. It is about a near-death experience and in the reading of it, I realised I had read it before. But somehow that led me to research negative near-death experiences, rather than the traditional seeing-a-light-feeling-like-a-butterfly NDE. So after reading some websites, that led me to Nancy Evans Bush's, Dancing Past the Dark on the Kindle app.

She was or is a pastor and studied theology and had a hell-like NDE fifty years ago. The book is an effort on her part to try and understand why. It's a very well written book and the only complaint I have is the typos in the Kindle edition. Someone could go to Hell for that.

And then that book led me down the garden path to C.S. Lewis' The Great Divorce. I've read several of Lewis' books but not that one. I have literally just started it and it remains to be seen whether I will page through it only to turn to another book or stay with it.
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Old 12-09-2013, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
5,864 posts, read 4,977,863 times
Reputation: 4207
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