Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-09-2013, 04:58 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Animal Dreams was the first Barbara Kingsolver book I read and made me a lifetime fan. I like T.C. Boyle too, but he's sometimes a little intense for me. I'm thinking about Tortilla Curtain when I say that.

Let us know about East is East.
I just discovered that I actually posted this in another thread! Reposting here (obviously).
Anna Karenina: I am about to start chapter 15 of Part Two, and every sentence is amazing. Tolstoy's writing is just a pertinent today as it was when it was written. The technology may have changed, but people are still people and he portrays his characters with such reality that I feel like I am inside the story, like an invisible presence observing not only the events but the motivations and thoughts behind them. I will be sad when it's finished.

As for "East is East" -- what is that saying you guys use? "Meh?" I am enjoying it, but it is more farcical than the last work "A Friend of the Earth" and his plot progression isn't as compelling. There are fits and starts, and sometimes I find my attention drifting off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
Tortilla Curtain was one of those books that I just can't ever get out of my mind. In a good, and not-so-good, way...
That's how I felt about "A Friend of the Earth." I actually hated the book for the content, but it was that compelling that I had to read it, and though I read it more than ten years ago it comes back to me again and again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
... But it's one of the few books I've ever read n which I liked the ending.
I don't think I could keep reading if that were the case for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
I started Boyle's When The Killings Done but didn't finish it. ... I might try Boyle's The Women. My favorite architect's love life is fascinating.
I thought the concept was intriguing, but no matter how many times I pick it up, I always end up putting it back down. I don't know why!

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
The only trouble I had with it is that we are having -40 temperatures and when you read a book where the weather is cold, I felt I couldn't get warm.
...
And then that book led me down the garden path to C.S. Lewis' The Great Divorce. I've read several of Lewis' books but not that one. I have literally just started it and it remains to be seen whether I will page through it only to turn to another book or stay with it.
"Thin air" leaves me feeling chilled just thinking of it, and though we've been sub-freezing here we haven't been THAT cold. Sending warming thoughts your direction!

I loved Lewis's "Narnia" tales, and while "Mere Christianity" left me "Meh," I found "Surprised by Joy," well, joyful. I've never heard of "The Great Divorce."

(Happy to be here instead of incorrectly posting my reading observations on the other thread!)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-09-2013, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Quote:
.. But it's (Charles Portis' "Dog of the South") one of the few books I've ever read in which I liked the ending.
I don't think I could keep reading if that were the case for me.
You mean you usually like the ending? Lot's of times I feel like the author is really struggling to make a graceful exit. Movies are even worse. I don't know how many times I've screamed "Roll the credits!!!",

One of the greatest endings that sticks in my mind was Charles Frazier's "Thirteen Moons", which made me laugh and cry at the same time..

Last edited by jtur88; 12-09-2013 at 10:01 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 05:03 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
You mean you usually like the ending? Lot's of times I feel like the author is really struggling to make a graceful exit. Movies are even worse. I don't know how many times I've screamed "Roll the credits!!!",

One of the greatest endings that sticks in my mind was Charles Frazier's "Thirteen Moons", which made me laugh and cry at the same time..
Oh it most certainly does happen, JT, but they are exceptions. I guess I've been fortunate because though I may read some books that are not as good as others, most of them finish as well as they've begun and carried through. I think it pretty much follows the bell curve. The dogs might be a bit more frequent than the bests, but not by many.

So far, if I am ever sent to confinement, my short list to carry in would be:

Tolstoy's "War and Peace"
Michener's "The Source"
Hugo's "Les Misérables"
Wolfe's "You Can't Go Home Again"
Tolkien's "The Hobbit"

and, yes -- the Bible

There are many more I loved, but for reading again and again, one has to choose works that stand the test of time!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Richmond VA
6,883 posts, read 7,884,541 times
Reputation: 18209
I just slogged my way through 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami. I really liked the story and the characters, but for a book about a novelist that included a lot about editing novels, this book showed no evidence of having been edited. I could have reduced 900+ pages by one third and created a better book. That said, I'm going to try another Murakami book, just in case. A shorter one.

After being on the waiting list at the public library for MONTHS, I'm finally getting to check out Game of Thrones today or tomorrow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 06:17 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagemomma View Post
I just slogged my way through 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami. I really liked the story and the characters, but for a book about a novelist that included a lot about editing novels, this book showed no evidence of having been edited.
That is something I've noticed about some of the newer works. It is as if the publishers no longer have the ability to inform the author of quality improvements. I wonder if it's the author's exertion of ego? Artistic license over readerships' protections?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
I thought I had read all of Robert McCammon's books over the years but found out that I had never read Boy's Life. So, I'm about 60% through it and it is a total delight. The author usually writes horror books but this one is a softer book. It's a combination of King's The Body and Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry.

Besides being beautifully written it is an in depth look at life via a 11-12 year old boy in small town Alabama in the early 1960s. The reader knows these characters and may well identify with some of them. I love this book.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis was not very interesting. I finished it though. One thing about -40 weather is that you get a lot of time to read in between those times when you aren't fixing things the weather has broken. Mayberry - you might like The Pilgrim's Regress by Lewis. I read it years ago, and I liked it very much. I may download it and read it again. The copy I read was from the library.

Right now I have gone back to a Kindle book I started at least a month ago. It has a very interesting idea and the style is obviously based on Dean Koontz but because it is self-published, it could have done with an editor to point out redundancies and where the story could be better developed. I can see how much potential it has though but the over-writing and under-writing is what caused me to be able to put it aside for so long. But since I do want to find out how the story ends, I will continue it. I am halfway through.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2013, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,301 times
Reputation: 1205
Im reading Trista Sutters book..she was the first Bachelorrette...I like it so far :}
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 08:25 AM
 
9,238 posts, read 22,890,741 times
Reputation: 22699
With all the recent posting about Donna Tartt, I ordered all 3 of her books and just started The Little Friend last night. I LOVE her writing. Thanks to all who recommended her!
I'm sure a lot of authors could write the story of the murder of a child and the impact on the family, but I don't think anyone could tell the story the way she is telling it. I keep re-reading sentences just because of how they're strung together or because of the visual images they evoke. Even the way she describes how we recall traumatic memories, in little flashes and images, and how little insignificant things about the event keep coming to mind--it's like she tapped into those scarred places in all our minds, that we all have.
And damn, I'm only in the first chapter!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2013, 09:11 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,349,261 times
Reputation: 1795
After The Fault in Our Stars, I am taking a hiatus from reading to focus on a couple of Christmas present projects I am working on. This is an extremely busy week for me too, so hopefully next week calms down and I'm thinking about starting The Goldfinch. Looking forward to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

¬© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top