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Old 12-12-2013, 04:23 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,075,496 times
Reputation: 27092

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
I'm 1/3 into Life After Life by Kate Atkinson and am becoming increasingly bored with the story. Even a promised surprise ending will not make me slog through to the end.
Some of these books are about 100 pages too long. and they become repetitious as other posters have mentioned. I remember award winning novels were usually 300 pages. Now, it's about 400. An article I read blames American writers and editors for "fat" books. The article was published in a British newspaper.

In the meantime, I've finished The Dinner by Edward Koch. Apparently, the book is a hit in Europe. It's dark and depressing with interesting, but not very moral charaters. I thought it was a compelling read. The Dinner has been compared to Gone Girl which I did not read.

The Good Lord Bird by James McBride looks very promising. It is about a slave boy in Kansas who is abducted by John Brown after Brown kills his father and the slavemaster. The abolitionist mistakenly believes the boy is a girl.

I was thinking of reading "The Good Lord Bird " but I dont know if it is something I would enjoy reading .
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Old 12-12-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
well I am going to try and start the aviators wife by melanie benjamin . I throughly enjoyed "Mrs Tom Thumb " written by her . Since I dont think I have ever seen this book mentioned here before , I was wondering if any of you have read "The aviators wife " ? I will come back and let you all know what I think of this one .
I just downloaded The Aviator's Wife from the library on my kindle because I so enjoyed Mrs. Tom Thumb. I posted my comments and believe someone else did, too.
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Old 12-12-2013, 06:19 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
I FINALLY finished TC Boyle's "East is East." I am wondering why I thought Boyle was a great writer. It started out fairly humorous, but halfway into it his plot timing started dragging. By the last one-hundred pages I was wishing it would end. In the final fifty I was hating it and sorry I ever picked it up. And here I sit with his "The Tortilla Curtain" beside me, waiting.

It's going to be a long wait.

Next up: "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest."
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Old 12-13-2013, 02:58 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
23,216 posts, read 29,026,930 times
Reputation: 32608
I'm reading Coffee, A Dark History, by Antony Wild. Interesting, where it all began, in the Middle East, where coffee is referred to as the Wine of Araby.

It's easy to forget that caffeine is a drug, which we all use everyday.

You wouldn't have wanted to live under Murad IV, between 1623 and 1640, in Turkey. He banned not only tobacco but coffee as well, during his realm. Caught drinking a cup of coffee, you could be sewn up in a burlap bag and dumped into the Bosporus Sea!

I'm also re-reading Tobacco, A Cultural History Of How A Drug Seduced Civilization by Iain Gately. This book was so interesting I have to read it again!

Tobacco enemas during the Victorian Era in England? Packing a pipe with tobacco to give to school kids in England? Early attempts to curb smoking during the 1600's in Europe, like chopping off your limbs if caught smoking? Too much, too much!!!
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Old 12-13-2013, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 12,362,958 times
Reputation: 6678
Just finished Defending Jacob...very good with a real twist at the ending and
The Third Gate...outstanding (of course I'm a fan of Preston/Child anything together or alone)
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Old 12-13-2013, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,855 posts, read 6,368,233 times
Reputation: 22048
Reading “Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other” by Sherry Turkle (2011), am more than halfway through that.

Next up is Rachel Herz's "That's Disgusting: Unraveling the Mysteries of Repulsion" (2012)-enjoyed her earlier book about the sense of smell, "The Scent of Desire".
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Old 12-14-2013, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I was thinking of reading "The Good Lord Bird " but I dont know if it is something I would enjoy reading .
You know, you can look up practically any book on Amazon, and click the "Look inside" tab on the corner of the book picture, and read quite a few pages of it, to get a feel as to whether you'd like it or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I FINALLY finished TC Boyle's "East is East." I am wondering why I thought Boyle was a great writer. It started out fairly humorous, but halfway into it his plot timing started dragging. By the last one-hundred pages I was wishing it would end. In the final fifty I was hating it and sorry I ever picked it up. And here I sit with his "The Tortilla Curtain" beside me, waiting.

It's going to be a long wait.

Next up: "The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest."
I found Boyle to be variable -- some books I enjoyed and others I disliked. So don't give up on him.

Please don't read "Hornets Nest" if you have not read the trilogy from the beginning ("Dragon Tattoo"). For those of you who have not read the trilogy yet, it starts off as rather heavy and deep reading, but evens out into a story that is pretty easy to follow.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:40 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I found Boyle to be variable -- some books I enjoyed and others I disliked. So don't give up on him.

Please don't read "Hornets Nest" if you have not read the trilogy from the beginning ("Dragon Tattoo"). For those of you who have not read the trilogy yet, it starts off as rather heavy and deep reading, but evens out into a story that is pretty easy to follow.
Thanks, JT, on both inputs. I received another's praise for "The Tortilla Curtain" so I will definitely read it, but I will make it wait for me!

As for "Hornets Nest" I have indeed read the first two of the trilogy -- AND watched the movies (which ARE almost as good as the books, but some of the interesting backstories are missing). In fact, that is why I am deciding to read it now, I cannot wait to see the third movie but I don't want to watch it before I read the book!

As and aside, I also found a mini-series version on Netflix that has been reviewed better than the movies because it includes a lot of those little backstories. I may go back and watch it, after the movies. It's really a shame that the author died. I would've liked for him to know how well received his work has been.
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Old 12-14-2013, 02:30 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 18,155,603 times
Reputation: 10355
NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

A creepy, evocative, complex supernatural story that still remains rooted in the real world.
The author poses a serious challenge to Stephen King! Really, really good stuff.

IMHO Boyle's "Tortilla Curtain" is probably his best work ever, Mayberry! I hope you read it.
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Old 12-14-2013, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

A creepy, evocative, complex supernatural story that still remains rooted in the real world.
The author poses a serious challenge to Stephen King! Really, really good stuff.

Joe Hill is Stephen King's son. So, he comes by his writing talent honestly.
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