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Old 12-14-2013, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766

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Through the years I have read a lot of mysteries by many authors. I downloaded a free gem to my kindle titled City of Beads by Tony Dunbar. Our hero is a private eye and the action is in New Orleans (the city of Mardi Gras beads).

I can already tell that this one is a winner. The writing and story remind me a bit of Robert B. Parker's work. It's funny in places as only Parker's Spenser could be. But it is not a comedy. Oh, no. It's a full blown who-done-it with all the joys and mystery that NOLA (New Orleans Louisiana) can provide. Murder, mayhem, foreign intrigue and lots of beer served with exceptional seafood are on the menu.

I guess I was ready for a trip to the Big Muddy like "In 1814 we took a little trip along with Col. Jackson down the mighty Mississip." Just thought I'd throw that in because I love that song. The book is set in modern times and not in 1814. I recommend it if you are not in the mood for a deeply emotional, full of literary highlights, quotable book.
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Old 12-14-2013, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,143 posts, read 10,706,529 times
Reputation: 9799
I previously mentioned that I was reading The Passage by Justin Cronin. Just wanted to let everyone know that I'm about 2/3 through it and it is still just as engrossing as it was at the beginning. I really can't explain his writing style, nor can I compare him or this book to any other author or their work.

It's classified as post-apocalyptic, but it actually kind of combines post-apocalyptic with science fiction, survivalist, fantasy and - believe it or not - a vampire story. If you are at all fond of the works of Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Terry Brooks, or anyone like them, you need to pick this one up.

I don't normally post any sort of a review of a book until I've finished it, so that may tell you exactly how much I am enjoying this one.
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Old 12-14-2013, 08:26 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 18,155,603 times
Reputation: 10355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
Joe Hill is Stephen King's son. So, he comes by his writing talent honestly.
I just figured this out!
I hope he writes more, he is a fun read.
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Old 12-14-2013, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood, DE and beautiful SXM!
12,054 posts, read 23,341,957 times
Reputation: 31918
Just finished James Swain's Wild Card. Don't know how I missed this in all the years that I have been reading his books, but I think this is one of the first Tony Valentine books. Swain is an excellent writer for those of you who are not familiar with him.
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
Through the years I have read a lot of mysteries by many authors. I downloaded a free gem to my kindle titled City of Beads by Tony Dunbar. Our hero is a private eye and the action is in New Orleans (the city of Mardi Gras beads).

I can already tell that this one is a winner. The writing and story remind me a bit of Robert B. Parker's work. It's funny in places as only Parker's Spenser could be. But it is not a comedy. Oh, no. It's a full blown who-done-it with all the joys and mystery that NOLA (New Orleans Louisiana) can provide. Murder, mayhem, foreign intrigue and lots of beer served with exceptional seafood are on the menu.

I guess I was ready for a trip to the Big Muddy like "In 1814 we took a little trip along with Col. Jackson down the mighty Mississip." Just thought I'd throw that in because I love that song. The book is set in modern times and not in 1814. I recommend it if you are not in the mood for a deeply emotional, full of literary highlights, quotable book.
"We took a little bacon, and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British near the town of New Orleans..." Johnny Horton.

Speaking of the British, what was the name of the British writer you compared to that mystery writer - I forget his name - but there was a controversy about Tom Cruise playing the character in a movie? Am I making sense? I blame Christmas stress for my brain fade.
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimRom View Post
I previously mentioned that I was reading The Passage by Justin Cronin. Just wanted to let everyone know that I'm about 2/3 through it and it is still just as engrossing as it was at the beginning. I really can't explain his writing style, nor can I compare him or this book to any other author or their work.

It's classified as post-apocalyptic, but it actually kind of combines post-apocalyptic with science fiction, survivalist, fantasy and - believe it or not - a vampire story. If you are at all fond of the works of Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Terry Brooks, or anyone like them, you need to pick this one up.

I don't normally post any sort of a review of a book until I've finished it, so that may tell you exactly how much I am enjoying this one.

I've read it and enjoyed it very much. It's the first part of a trilogy. I didn't enjoy the second book as much as The Passage and the third book is still to come.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
"We took a little bacon, and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British near the town of New Orleans..." Johnny Horton.

Speaking of the British, what was the name of the British writer you compared to that mystery writer - I forget his name - but there was a controversy about Tom Cruise playing the character in a movie? Am I making sense? I blame Christmas stress for my brain fade.
I don't know, Net. The big hoohaw that I remember about Tom Cruise (regarding movie roles) is the movie based on Interview With The Vampire by Anne Rice (of New Orleans fame). Cruise was selected to play Lestat and the fans of Rice went nuts and not in a good way.....I went nuts, too. Cruise was in no way like Lestat. I have to admit, though, that Crazy Cruise did a good job. Oh, it hurts me to say that. I am not a Cruise fan.
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Old 12-15-2013, 03:09 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,075,496 times
Reputation: 27092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I don't know, Net. The big hoohaw that I remember about Tom Cruise (regarding movie roles) is the movie based on Interview With The Vampire by Anne Rice (of New Orleans fame). Cruise was selected to play Lestat and the fans of Rice went nuts and not in a good way.....I went nuts, too. Cruise was in no way like Lestat. I have to admit, though, that Crazy Cruise did a good job. Oh, it hurts me to say that. I am not a Cruise fan.

Im sure no fan of a man who picks younger women to marry and I find that distrubing as well . Because at my age and maybe earlier I have learned to look at a man like this as a control freak , yes he marrys younger women so that he can control them . Guess Katie had finally had enough and so did Nicole and his first wife Mimi something . Anyways no crazy cruise fan either .
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Old 12-15-2013, 04:57 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
6,191 posts, read 18,155,603 times
Reputation: 10355
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimRom View Post
I previously mentioned that I was reading The Passage by Justin Cronin. Just wanted to let everyone know that I'm about 2/3 through it and it is still just as engrossing as it was at the beginning. I really can't explain his writing style, nor can I compare him or this book to any other author or their work.

It's classified as post-apocalyptic, but it actually kind of combines post-apocalyptic with science fiction, survivalist, fantasy and - believe it or not - a vampire story. If you are at all fond of the works of Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Terry Brooks, or anyone like them, you need to pick this one up.

I don't normally post any sort of a review of a book until I've finished it, so that may tell you exactly how much I am enjoying this one.
I really wanted to love this book - I read it about a month ago. But about half-way through it started to unravel for me. Too many characters, too many plot holes, too much jumping back and forth over time. Characters (or groups of characters) would be well-developed for several chapters, then never written about again. I started to get confused and annoyed, because I kept having to thumb back to earlier points in the book to figure out who was who and what was going on.

But the writing was lush and evocative and the post-apocalyptic landscape very-well imagined.
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Old 12-15-2013, 08:46 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Wow! Great morning on the book thread!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
Through the years I have read a lot of mysteries by many authors. I downloaded a free gem to my kindle titled City of Beads by Tony Dunbar. Our hero is a private eye and the action is in New Orleans (the city of Mardi Gras beads).
Too funny! This review was so great that I immediately went out to Goodreads to put it on my "want to read" list, and discovered I'd already read it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimRom View Post
I previously mentioned that I was reading The Passage by Justin Cronin.
...
It's classified as post-apocalyptic, but it actually kind of combines post-apocalyptic with science fiction, survivalist, fantasy and - believe it or not - a vampire story.
Uh-oh! I have it on the Kindle, though other preferences keep pushing it out -- and now the vampire element may push it out even further! The whole vampire scene just leaves me cold and questioning of people's sanity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SXMGirl View Post
Just finished James Swain's Wild Card. Don't know how I missed this in all the years that I have been reading his books, but I think this is one of the first Tony Valentine books. Swain is an excellent writer for those of you who are not familiar with him.
'K, you sold me. I checked out the library download offerings and though the Valentine availability is scant, his Jack Carpenter series is fully fleshed. Looks like Valentine's is set in Vegas, and the Carpenter series is set in FL. I told DH, too -- he loves that genre. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
... Am I making sense? I blame Christmas stress for my brain fade.
When in doubt, pour more rum -- I mean Eggnog! Yeah, that's it -- eggnog!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
...I have to admit, though, that Crazy Cruise did a good job. Oh, it hurts me to say that. I am not a Cruise fan.
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
...Anyways no crazy cruise fan either .
I like Cruise's movies, but I have to stonewall what I've seen in the lines at the grocery checkout lane to enjoy them since all the PR came out. To some extent, I think he IS a good actor because he is a control freak, but what works in pictures doesn't work in life and he doesn't seem to understand that, yet. Plus, I imagine all the success has stoked his already stoked small man ego.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chiroptera View Post
I really wanted to love this book - I read it about a month ago. But about half-way through it started to unravel for me. Too many characters, too many plot holes, too much jumping back and forth over time. Characters (or groups of characters) would be well-developed for several chapters, then never written about again. I started to get confused and annoyed, because I kept having to thumb back to earlier points in the book to figure out who was who and what was going on.

But the writing was lush and evocative and the post-apocalyptic landscape very-well imagined.
This sounds like me when I started (years ago) reading Dostoyevsky. I found that tracking the characters on a 3"x5" (to use as a bookmark) was helpful. Then again, I had to read the books (assigned), and you don't.
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