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Old 12-15-2013, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,855 posts, read 6,368,927 times
Reputation: 22048

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Today I finished reading “That’s Disgusting: Unraveling the Mysteries of Repulsion” by Rachel Herz, 2012.
Quote:
Originally Posted by book excerpts
"Disgust is an unfolding and cognitive emotion; it protects us from creeping dangers that we have to figure out, dangers that are slow in their deadliness, and of which disease, contamination, and decomposition are the foremost threats."

"Only when we have abundance, opportunity, and security can we afford to be revolted by rotted food, an ugly potential mate, or a neighbor’s licentious behavior. When survival is the only thing that counts we will eat anything we can, mate with whomever we can, and enlist the help of anyone who is available."
I found it though-provoking exploration of what fascinates us yet makes us cringe,
and was intrigued by the delineation between and conflation of disgust and anger,
and breaking down of the subtypes of "disgust"-be it on visceral/sensory or cognitive/moral levels.
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Old 12-16-2013, 06:19 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,546,726 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloven View Post
Today I finished reading “That’s Disgusting: Unraveling the Mysteries of Repulsion” by Rachel Herz, 2012.

I found it though-provoking exploration of what fascinates us yet makes us cringe, and was intrigued by the delineation between and conflation of disgust and anger, and breaking down of the subtypes of "disgust"-be it on visceral/sensory or cognitive/moral levels.
I thought your quote: "Only when we have abundance, opportunity, and security can we afford to be revolted..." was particularly remarkable. While perusing the libraries digital offerings yesterday I saw book two book covers about people that live on the rest of our trash. I didn't look further into the books; "Behind the Beautiful Forevers" was enough for me on that regard. Still, I had a similar thought to that quote. While I wrinkled my nose at the thought of going through our garbage to live, I also knew that if I were in their shoes I would be glad to do it. There but for the grace of God....
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Old 12-17-2013, 06:12 AM
 
Location: The Jar
20,048 posts, read 18,302,537 times
Reputation: 37125
Alaska Bear Tales by Larry Kaniut
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Old 12-17-2013, 01:38 PM
 
218 posts, read 544,310 times
Reputation: 327
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I've read it and enjoyed it very much. It's the first part of a trilogy. I didn't enjoy the second book as much as The Passage and the third book is still to come.
Argh...waiting on that third book. I think it's still a year out! :\
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Old 12-17-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Kent, Ohio
3,429 posts, read 2,732,259 times
Reputation: 1667
Right now I'm reading: "Nobody Nowhere" by Donna Williams
I'm about half-way through the book, and so far it is fascinating. Donna Williams is a high-functioning autistic. It is incredibly rare to find an autistic person who can write in such an insightful and self-reflective way. It is especially amazing because she is literally developing a sense of self through this narrative writing process. In other words "nobody nowhere" gradually developed into a self-reflective person as the writing progressed. After this book, she wrote several more. I will probably read some or all of these other books as well.
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Old 12-17-2013, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,948,301 times
Reputation: 36644
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
"We took a little bacon, and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British near the town of New Orleans..." Johnny Horton.

Speaking of the British, what was the name of the British writer you compared to that mystery writer - I forget his name - but there was a controversy about Tom Cruise playing the character in a movie? Am I making sense? I blame Christmas stress for my brain fade.

Sorry, but I hate it when Horton is given any credit at all for this. The song was written by Arkansas songwriter Jimmy Driftwood, and his version was released first, but contained some language that was too colorful for 1950's radio, and Horton chopped out about half the verses and made the "safe" version.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nE4yTfawEH8
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,143 posts, read 10,707,417 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I've read it and enjoyed it very much. It's the first part of a trilogy. I didn't enjoy the second book as much as The Passage and the third book is still to come.
Finished the first one, and it was a wild ride at the end. I'm about 1/3 through the second volume, and I think I may see what problems you were having with it. It seems to jump from character set to character set quite frequently without really tying up any loose ends along the way (with one exception so far). However, I'm still enjoying Cronin's writing style and character development. It's almost like he wrote the main story then decided to use the middle volume for back story. I've seen it done before, and while it's a bit irritating at times it can still be a fun read.

Just saw that they are planning to turn the novels into movies. Not real sure if it's going to be a feasible transition considering the depth of the story and cast, but I'll probably watch them. Here's to hoping that they remain somewhat faithful to the novels like Lord of the Rings did, rather than butchering the story into unrecognizability like Eragon did.
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,855 posts, read 6,368,927 times
Reputation: 22048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylenwoof View Post
Right now I'm reading: "Nobody Nowhere" by Donna Williams
I'm about half-way through the book, and so far it is fascinating. Donna Williams is a high-functioning autistic. It is incredibly rare to find an autistic person who can write in such an insightful and self-reflective way. It is especially amazing because she is literally developing a sense of self through this narrative writing process. In other words "nobody nowhere" gradually developed into a self-reflective person as the writing progressed. After this book, she wrote several more. I will probably read some or all of these other books as well.
Have read all 4 of her memoirs, incl. that^ one-fascinating material & I related to much (not all) of it.
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Old 12-18-2013, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,319,963 times
Reputation: 62766
I am once again reading Personal History by Katherine Graham. It's an autobiography of an amazing woman and also a biography of The Washington Post. She was the owner. This book and the author won the Pulitizer Prize for biography in 1998. I reread it every couple of years.

Okay, I know I tend to gush over some books. This is one of them.

I only came to love biographies at about age 35. When I "discovered" them I felt like an entire new world opened up for me in this genre of books.

Simply put, I love this book. I wish I had known Mrs. Graham. She takes us through her interesting life, yeah, interesting. That alone is good stuff. Balancing that is the history of The Washington Post. I am not, nor have I ever been, a newspaper fanatic. Bluntly put, I was ignorant of the goings on in that industry. Of course the Post is, IMO, the golden child of newspapers. I learned so many behind-the-scenes goodies that every time I read this book I feel like I'm following Willy Wonka through his factory and gorging on treats. Yes, I like blueberries a lot.

I have this book in hardback and also on my kindle. It would be a nice gift to give to someone for Christmas or birthday or a make-sure-your-socks-match celebration.

Needless to say, I recommend it. Go get it. Now. Please.
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Old 12-18-2013, 07:56 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,703,557 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I am once again reading Personal History by Katherine Graham. It's an autobiography of an amazing woman and also a biography of The Washington Post. She was the owner. This book and the author won the Pulitizer Prize for biography in 1998. I reread it every couple of years.

Okay, I know I tend to gush over some books. This is one of them.

I only came to love biographies at about age 35. When I "discovered" them I felt like an entire new world opened up for me in this genre of books.

Simply put, I love this book. I wish I had known Mrs. Graham. She takes us through her interesting life, yeah, interesting. That alone is good stuff. Balancing that is the history of The Washington Post. I am not, nor have I ever been, a newspaper fanatic. Bluntly put, I was ignorant of the goings on in that industry. Of course the Post is, IMO, the golden child of newspapers. I learned so many behind-the-scenes goodies that every time I read this book I feel like I'm following Willy Wonka through his factory and gorging on treats. Yes, I like blueberries a lot.

I have this book in hardback and also on my kindle. It would be a nice gift to give to someone for Christmas or birthday or a make-sure-your-socks-match celebration.

Needless to say, I recommend it. Go get it. Now. Please.
I read it as part of a book club I was in about 10 years ago and enjoyed it. Others in the group did not like it as much.

She paints a very interesting picture of her life and the society in which she traveled. One thing that I always remember is that she said as an adult she once had occasion to iron a dress and that she had never done that before. Even with her privileged upbringing, she stepped into the nitty-gritty role of publisher at the WP without missing a beat.
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