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Old 01-25-2014, 06:41 PM
 
Location: not where you are
8,757 posts, read 9,461,254 times
Reputation: 8327

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I am sorry to learn it, PhoneLady. I was hoping I was wrong.



I searched both Goodreads and my public library, but found him only in an online volume of Literary Criticism in my library's database. The full text of the criticism was available, but they make my head swim.


I was voted the one in my high school class to most likely become an existentialist. Despite enough literature for two majors and a minor, and a casual interest in philosophy, I could never understand what that actually meant. Then, when I met DH, he told me his favorite existentialist author was Camus. I read two of his works, "The Plague," and a portion of another (title forgotten). I was just as confused after reading them, and very, very depressed. Just thinking about his work makes my day darken.

I agree his writing is rather dark, and mostly that's why I've so far only read two of his works, besides with some authors, I don't need to have their point hammered in a million different ways. I wasn't fond of the main character, The Stranger, but, I respected what Camus did with the character and especially how the story concluded. However most of the while reading, I just wanted to smack the lead character up aside his head, if set in todays times one might think may he had a touch of Aspergers syndrome. Absurdity is definitely a good classification for the story, but it was different from most anything I had read in a long time during that time.

I was once on a real Hermann Hesse kick a very lonnggggg time ago. So different and so much more positive for the most part.

Last edited by TRosa; 01-25-2014 at 06:52 PM..
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:05 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
I was once on a real Hermann Hesse kick a very lonnggggg time ago. So different and so much more positive for the most part.
For me it was Dostoyevsky, but I was an ardent young woman in the Midwest from a very narrow (culturally) upbringing, and I think most of the attraction was simply the remoteness of what he wrote about. I think I started down that path after seeing Dr. Zhivago.

The only work by Hesse that I read was "Siddhartha," though I've meant to go back and read his others I just never have. Which was the most compelling for you?
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Old 01-25-2014, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
I'm reading Radical Survivor by Nancy Saltzman.

It was on a list of free kindle downloads and her name sounded so familiar to me. For some reason I did not read up on the author. I simply dove into the book.

This is truly the easiest book I have ever read. It's an autobiography and she details her life. It's not all that much about her childhood but more about her college years and married years and her children. One would think, after reading on amazon what the book is about, that this book would be horribly depressing. She suffered a major, massive loss in her life. Having said that I will add that it is not depressing. It is very sad but she muffles the sadness with uplifting situations and notes from a group of amazing friends and family.

Okay. I just know I am not selling this book to most of y'all because, frankly, I have failed to make it enticing. It's just plain good. No lie. I just checked and it is still a free kindle download. Give it a chance. It's a fast read and extremely well written and will remind us all that there is a passel of very fine, kind people walking this earth.
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Old 01-25-2014, 09:15 PM
 
Location: not where you are
8,757 posts, read 9,461,254 times
Reputation: 8327
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
For me it was Dostoyevsky, but I was an ardent young woman in the Midwest from a very narrow (culturally) upbringing, and I think most of the attraction was simply the remoteness of what he wrote about. I think I started down that path after seeing Dr. Zhivago.

The only work by Hesse that I read was "Siddhartha," though I've meant to go back and read his others I just never have. Which was the most compelling for you?
We're talking some 30+ years ago, I can barely remember many of the titles or stories, but he too had a basic theme. LOL. Back then they were all quite compelling Siddhartha was my first read of his, which was assigned during philosophy class, but then I took it from there. Narcissus and Goldman, I believe was maybe the third or forth of his books I had read. I was enthralled with the man's writing at the time.
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Old 01-25-2014, 09:23 PM
 
Location: not where you are
8,757 posts, read 9,461,254 times
Reputation: 8327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I'm reading Radical Survivor by Nancy Saltzman.

It was on a list of free kindle downloads and her name sounded so familiar to me. For some reason I did not read up on the author. I simply dove into the book.

This is truly the easiest book I have ever read. It's an autobiography and she details her life. It's not all that much about her childhood but more about her college years and married years and her children. One would think, after reading on amazon what the book is about, that this book would be horribly depressing. She suffered a major, massive loss in her life. Having said that I will add that it is not depressing. It is very sad but she muffles the sadness with uplifting situations and notes from a group of amazing friends and family.

Okay. I just know I am not selling this book to most of y'all because, frankly, I have failed to make it enticing. It's just plain good. No lie. I just checked and it is still a free kindle download. Give it a chance. It's a fast read and extremely well written and will remind us all that there is a passel of very fine, kind people walking this earth.
I can't speak for anyone else, but I'm sold. I will add "Radical Survior" to my list. I was half way through a memoir, by Liz Murray, but became so disenchanted I moved on and am about 30 pages from finishing a different book I started up reading the other day.
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Old 01-26-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
13,622 posts, read 10,024,461 times
Reputation: 17006
Bill Bryson, Notes From A Big Country.
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Old 01-26-2014, 09:45 AM
 
Location: DFW
24 posts, read 54,051 times
Reputation: 22
Love & War: Twenty Years, Three Presidents, Two Daughters and One Louisiana Home

By: Carville, James, Matalin, Mary
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Old 01-26-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,301 times
Reputation: 1205
Ranger Confidential: Working, Living, and Dying in the National Parks
by Andrea Lankford

he tells her stories of being a park ranger and its really good, doesn't paint a pretty picture of being a park ranger but she also goes on about how rewarding the career can be.

Ive thought of being a Park Ranger or Fish and Wildlife officer so this is a good read for me
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Old 01-26-2014, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,855 posts, read 6,368,233 times
Reputation: 22048
I'm almost 2/3 through the 300-page “America Anonymous: Eight Addicts in Search of a Life” by Benoit Denizet-Lewis (2009)
The author is an addict as well, and he follows eight people (men, women, younger, older) in the United States
who are struggling with their own addictions (to behaviors & substances).
I'm enjoying the book, it mixes analysis and case studies/stories, which is a writing style I can easily absorb/comprehend.
Quote:
[in 1842]...Abraham Lincoln argued that addiction should not be viewed in moral or criminal terms.
“In my judgment,” he said, “such of us who have never fallen victims [to addiction] have been spared more by the absence of appetite than from any mental or moral superiority over those who have.”

“In essence, we’ve created a culture that supports and encourages addiction while at the same time shames, ridicules, and criminalizes those of us afflicted with it.”

“We’d rather build jails and spend millions of dollars cleaning up the messes of addicts, when we could spend much less and help them stop making messes.”
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Old 01-26-2014, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Under the Milky Way
1,295 posts, read 1,183,019 times
Reputation: 5288
cloven: very interesting, I think I'll check that book out. Thanks for that, because I am notorious for being one of those annoying people who generally disregards what others feel are good reads. It just goes to show that a closed mind not only closes out bad opinions, but often good ones as well, and in the very short time that i've been on this forum I've seen many new, interesting, and exploration-worthy viewpoints!
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