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Old 01-31-2014, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,855 posts, read 6,368,233 times
Reputation: 22048

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Know I saw this book mentioned in this thread many months back, but I only read it yesterday:
"Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness" by Susannah Cahalan (2012).

It was fascinating, like an episode of "House", in that she had a progressive disease that defied labeling and mimicked (in some ways) a mental disorder.
It was sheer luck that she was eventually properly diagnosed and responded well to the treatments,
and that she had a support system that advocated for her and enabled her to recover.
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Old 02-01-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Southern, NJ
5,504 posts, read 6,246,064 times
Reputation: 7645
C. J. Box--Joe Pickett, 5th In The Series Out Of Range
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Old 02-02-2014, 10:13 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
758 posts, read 1,639,467 times
Reputation: 945
Let's see.
I finished Gone with the Wind. Loved it! And though I will probably regret it, I've got Scarlett on the way to read soon.
Read House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer. Very good book. I felt like there was more of an underlying philosophical thread than a lot of YA dystopia books. I'll have to read the second book (Lord of Opium) soon.
Re-read Animal Farm yesterday. I forgot how much I enjoyed that book. Though poor Boxer. And I never quite figured out how it was possible that some of them confessed to crimes you know they didn't commit.

Currently starting both The 27th City (Jonathan Franzen) and Cutting for Stone to see which one sticks. Probably Cutting for Stone, and I'll put 27th City back in my 'to read' pile.
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA/Lk Hopatcong NJ
13,400 posts, read 28,719,321 times
Reputation: 12062
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I really enjoyed the "Lasher" series by Rice but I think she went off her rocker several years ago. Or, maybe I went off mine.
She did go off her rocker
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Old 02-02-2014, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Utah
1,458 posts, read 4,131,378 times
Reputation: 1548
Oh, Gone With The Wind, I'm glad I read it, even though I've seen it dozens of times!

I hope you enjoy Cutting For Stone. I've been to Addis, & it captures the "feel".

I just finished Escape From Camp 14. Gulp. Good thing I've read so much of Solzhenitsyn's work & was prepared for this. Now I have to find more to read about North Korea.
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Old 02-02-2014, 05:38 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Reading "Asking for Murder," By Roberta Isleib has been a treat. Her start was a bit rocky reading, but after the first chapter her writing seems to have smoothed out. I think it's hard for authors to write about a crisis situation as the starting point -- too often they seem to want to slow the action by telling the back story, and she fell into this trap.

By the third chapter I was hooked, and read the first half yesterday. After DH is done watching Superbowl I will go back to it.
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:37 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by lolagranola View Post
I just finished Escape From Camp 14. Gulp. Good thing I've read so much of Solzhenitsyn's work & was prepared for this. Now I have to find more to read about North Korea.
I am very glad that I read Escape from Camp 14, though the dry, devoid of emotion style of the writing really left me wanting more from the author. I wonder if it was written like that because the central figure was most likely so emotionally stunted from his horrific upbringing in the labor camp.
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Old 02-03-2014, 04:13 AM
 
3,943 posts, read 6,372,071 times
Reputation: 4233
Kind of Kin by Rilla Askew About the Immigration laws in Oklahoma, and how it affects some people in a small town.

Banished by Lauren Drain About a young woman being banished from that crazy cult of the Westboro Baptist Church. There's only family in the church, except for 1 other family.
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Old 02-03-2014, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Stuck in NE GA right now
4,585 posts, read 12,362,958 times
Reputation: 6678
Just finished An Echo Through The Snow by Andrea Thalasinos. A wonderful story based on the Chukchi people and their dogs they called The Guardians; and how they were saved and ended up in Alaska called Siberian Huskies. It is actually 2 parallel stories, one taking place in the 1920's and one taking place in modern Wisconsin and it's wonderful and surprise ending on how they merge. The background story is about dog sledding and how these dogs were bred for centuries to pull.

Loved it!
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Old 02-03-2014, 01:35 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Finished The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck. No wonder it's a classic--she captures the essence of humanity. Even though the culture she writes about (pre-revolutionary China) is foreign to me, the characters in the book could be next door neighbors.

Went to the library and pulled some random things off the shelves, including Coming Clean, by Kimberly Rae Miller, which was surprisingly good. It's a memoir about growing up with parents who were hoarders. She writes honestly about her shame and all they went through trying to hide what was going on in the house, but also writes lovingly about her parents. It's an easy read and well worth it if you're at all interested in hoarding and hoarders.

Then I read Tears of the Giraffe by Alexander McCall Smith, the second book in the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series and moved right on to The Morality of Beautiful Girls, the third in the series.
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