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Old 02-03-2014, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Richmond VA
6,883 posts, read 7,884,541 times
Reputation: 18209

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The Book Thief is notoriously hard to get into. Worth sticking with. Also must read: I am the Messenger by Markus Zusak (same author) there are multiple moments in that book that made me say WTH! and I just couldn't put it down. great concept, well executed (modern setting, not historical like the book thief)

Right now I'm reading Shift by Hugh Howey. Sequel to Wool. I think the second is better than the first. Very uniquely imagined world.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:56 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
... You made a good point about the possibility of not liking the voice on some audio books. I'm sure that can ruin a book for you and everyone else. For instance, I won't watch anything Fran Drescher is in because Fran Drescher's voice drives me crazy. My father had the Brooklyn accent but his voice was nice. Drescher's screeches in my ears.

I have never listened to an audio book. I wonder if the reader's voice defines the characters (unless the book is read by a narrator and not a character) for the listener. I don't think we will never know because if the audio book is heard first then the listener already has a character definition and the same goes for the book being read first. Does this make any sense. ...
It absolutely DOES make sense, and I have my own experiences to back it up. In fact, I have stopped listening to a number of books because the reader (I am the listener) did such a poor job of conveying the character I thought the author intended. (Worldly me, right? Okay, ASIDE from my super-inflated ego, when I am listening to the story, I get to form my own judgments. )

The big killer for me is when they make mouth noises. I am highly adverse to mouth noises (poor DH), and once listened to a woman reader obviously read with a dry mouth. I could actually hear her lips sticking to her teeth. I was tormented. (It didn't start until a few hours into the story.) I wanted to call the publishers and rant. Instead I just listened and made awful faces.

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
What do you do with your hands?
Well, you could wash your walls, I suppose.

For me, I knit, or crochet, or sew, cook, walk my dog. I am a diverse listener.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:05 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Speaking of audio books, I finished listening to Robert Wright's "The Evolution of God," and gave it an all stars rating. This is one book that I will have to go back and read, as one of the downfalls of audiobooks for me is I get distracted and miss things. With most fiction it isn't a problem, but with a work of this depth and breadth I want to understand it as much as possible.

It was AMAZING. Wright draws upon human and cultural evolution as well as historic documents, including Scripture, and particle physics to describe mankind's approach to religion over time. I cannot possibly give a brief summation except to say that regardless of one's religious beliefs or lack of belief this book is worth reading. One might go as far as to say it is required for the salvation of humankind.

Or, not.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:26 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Wash walls.

PS. I've never listened to an audio book either.
I paint walls.

The only time I listen to audio books is when I'm painting room in my house. It is perfect for that for a couple of reasons: 1. I get to do two things that I enjoy (reading and painting) at the same time and 2. My husband and kids steer clear and don't come bug me because they hate "the sound" of audio books!
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:57 PM
 
Location: not where you are
8,757 posts, read 9,461,254 times
Reputation: 8327
You all are a riot. I didn't know who to quote first, I just couldn't stop laughing. Paint/wash walls.

I'm too easily distracted if I don't just sit and focus on the voice. I already have a bad habit of mind wandering even while reading to myself some times. I can listen to music, get a massage, foot assisted exercises, I have done those things during physical therapy, read during TV commercial breaks, but cooking and various other activities that take away my focus, fagetaboutit.

And and may be true, I've heard a voice for CFS, (< see that can't screw it up,) I might not be able to get it out of my head. I might have to wait for the movie on that one. LOL

I think I will cancel the book thief. I did however enjoy, "The Glass Castle," on audio, but that could be because I've read the book previous to hearing the author on audio. Though I did nap during that reading as well. Hey, I listen through for like 10 or 12 hours straight, I deserved a unintended nap.
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Wash walls.

PS. I've never listened to an audio book either.
smarty pants.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
It absolutely DOES make sense, and I have my own experiences to back it up. In fact, I have stopped listening to a number of books because the reader (I am the listener) did such a poor job of conveying the character I thought the author intended. (Worldly me, right? Okay, ASIDE from my super-inflated ego, when I am listening to the story, I get to form my own judgments. )

The big killer for me is when they make mouth noises. I am highly adverse to mouth noises (poor DH), and once listened to a woman reader obviously read with a dry mouth. I could actually hear her lips sticking to her teeth. I was tormented. (It didn't start until a few hours into the story.) I wanted to call the publishers and rant. Instead I just listened and made awful faces.


Well, you could wash your walls, I suppose.

For me, I knit, or crochet, or sew, cook, walk my dog. I am a diverse listener.
That sounds like patting the top of your head and rubbing your stomach all at the same time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
You all are a riot. I didn't know who to quote first, I just couldn't stop laughing. Paint/wash walls.

I'm too easily distracted if I don't just sit and focus on the voice. I already have a bad habit of mind wandering even while reading to myself some times. I can listen to music, get a massage, foot assisted exercises, I have done those things during physical therapy, read during TV commercial breaks, but cooking and various other activities that take away my focus, fagetaboutit.
Exactly. I think deep, angst-ridden thoughts when I wash walls. And I sing.
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Old 02-04-2014, 12:12 AM
 
6,904 posts, read 7,599,549 times
Reputation: 21735
Someone here recommended Paul Auster's Timbuktu, and I just finished it. What a perfect little book, I loved it so much! Thank you, whoever you were.
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Old 02-04-2014, 09:18 AM
 
9,238 posts, read 22,890,741 times
Reputation: 22699
Reading The Circle by David Eggers. Someone here recommended it.

It's part near-future dystopia, part social commentary on where we're at in the present, with the obsessive use of social media and the compulsive disclosure of our personal lives online, combined with the sneaky storing of our electronic data and online "lives," and the possibility that this can end up in the government's hands.

I'm about 75% through it. At the very beginning, I was a little annoyed at the writing, because the dialogue read as awkward, simplistic, and like it was written by an adolescent. But the story was so compelling, I got past that. Now I think it might have been intentional: through the whole book, the main characters rely more and more on online social media communication, and this replaces real life communication. So of course dialogue between people in-person would be stilted and come off as immature. If you're in your 20s and most or all of your communication has been online, via "likes" and comments and posts, when you actually speak to other humans, you might sound like an inarticulate teenager. If Eggers didn't do this on purpose, he should claim that he did.

So many times in the book, I was reminded of encounters here on City-Data and on Facebook, especially with people getting overly sensitive to perceived insults and slights, and escalating emotionally in response.
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Old 02-04-2014, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
Reading The Circle by David Eggers. Someone here recommended it.

It's part near-future dystopia, part social commentary on where we're at in the present, with the obsessive use of social media and the compulsive disclosure of our personal lives online, combined with the sneaky storing of our electronic data and online "lives," and the possibility that this can end up in the government's hands.

I'm about 75% through it. At the very beginning, I was a little annoyed at the writing, because the dialogue read as awkward, simplistic, and like it was written by an adolescent. But the story was so compelling, I got past that. Now I think it might have been intentional: through the whole book, the main characters rely more and more on online social media communication, and this replaces real life communication. So of course dialogue between people in-person would be stilted and come off as immature. If you're in your 20s and most or all of your communication has been online, via "likes" and comments and posts, when you actually speak to other humans, you might sound like an inarticulate teenager. If Eggers didn't do this on purpose, he should claim that he did.

So many times in the book, I was reminded of encounters here on City-Data and on Facebook, especially with people getting overly sensitive to perceived insults and slights, and escalating emotionally in response.
What? You said that because I didn't get past the first 100 pages, didn't you? And because I didn't "get" that whole reason for the stilted communication thing and just hated its simplicity, right? You think I'm STOOPID??? I know that your post is completely directed at me!!!!

PS. For those of you who think my response was real, Tracy and I are friends on Facebook. I "like" and like her analysis of this book that I didn't bother finishing.
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Old 02-04-2014, 11:00 AM
 
9,238 posts, read 22,890,741 times
Reputation: 22699
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