Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-10-2014, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,023,154 times
Reputation: 28903

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
I'm so glad you enjoyed it! I have it on the library hold list again for my daughter to read. I'm debating just buying it so all my kids will read it instead of continuously getting from the library. I wasn't expecting it to be told from different points of view, and I really liked that aspect. Seriously, though, it has to be good if Dawn liked it and it's a YA book!
LOL! The writing was very simplistic -- which would usually bother me enough to stop reading -- but the story was well-told (I liked the different POVs too) and endearing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-10-2014, 09:54 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,350,226 times
Reputation: 1795
I agree it is simplistic writing. Author would then fall into the great storyteller category for sure. Perhaps the simplicity would make it great writing for all ages so as the message is very clear. But then again, not great literature so maybe not. But I like that all of my kids would understand it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,948,301 times
Reputation: 36644
Quitting Walker Percy's "The Moviegoer". Dreadfully dated. I recently read his "Thanatos Syndrome", written 25 years later and I quite liked it. "Moviegoer" was his first (and award winning) book, and it's written in that southern style that makes you want to read it in a southern accent like a pretentious woman on the front porch fanning herself and boring the hell out of you with anecdotes about everybody she's ever known as if you knew them too. Sprinkled suffocatingly with name-dropped streets and districts of New Orleans like a newcomer would do to show off his familiarity with the city. I jumped ahead 50 pages, and it was just more of the same. Bleech.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,254,113 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Quitting Walker Percy's "The Moviegoer". Dreadfully dated. I recently read his "Thanatos Syndrome", written 25 years later and I quite liked it. "Moviegoer" was his first (and award winning) book, and it's written in that southern style that makes you want to read it in a southern accent like a pretentious woman on the front porch fanning herself and boring the hell out of you with anecdotes about everybody she's ever known as if you knew them too. Sprinkled suffocatingly with name-dropped streets and districts of New Orleans like a newcomer would do to show off his familiarity with the city. I jumped ahead 50 pages, and it was just more of the same. Bleech.
I tried to read it twice and thought it boring.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,023,154 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Quitting Walker Percy's "The Moviegoer". Dreadfully dated. I recently read his "Thanatos Syndrome", written 25 years later and I quite liked it. "Moviegoer" was his first (and award winning) book, and it's written in that southern style that makes you want to read it in a southern accent like a pretentious woman on the front porch fanning herself and boring the hell out of you with anecdotes about everybody she's ever known as if you knew them too. Sprinkled suffocatingly with name-dropped streets and districts of New Orleans like a newcomer would do to show off his familiarity with the city. I jumped ahead 50 pages, and it was just more of the same. Bleech.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
I tried to read it twice and thought it boring.
Me three. I don't think I made it to page 20.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 01:19 PM
 
5,097 posts, read 6,347,106 times
Reputation: 11750
"A Venetian Affair"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 01:52 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,703,557 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Quitting Walker Percy's "The Moviegoer". Dreadfully dated. I recently read his "Thanatos Syndrome", written 25 years later and I quite liked it. "Moviegoer" was his first (and award winning) book, and it's written in that southern style that makes you want to read it in a southern accent like a pretentious woman on the front porch fanning herself and boring the hell out of you with anecdotes about everybody she's ever known as if you knew them too. Sprinkled suffocatingly with name-dropped streets and districts of New Orleans like a newcomer would do to show off his familiarity with the city. I jumped ahead 50 pages, and it was just more of the same. Bleech.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
I tried to read it twice and thought it boring.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Me three. I don't think I made it to page 20.
Just crossed that one off my "I should read this someday" list. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,948,301 times
Reputation: 36644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Just crossed that one off my "I should read this someday" list. Thanks!
But don't let that stop you from reading "Thanatos Syndrome", which was quite OK.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2014, 07:18 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,114 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
quite OK.
Quite OK - love this expression.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2014, 12:58 AM
 
3,943 posts, read 6,372,783 times
Reputation: 4233
I'm reading We Are Water by Wally Lamb. IMO, it's the best book he's written.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top