Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-04-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,075,496 times
Reputation: 27092

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
I've been cross referencing some authors and I thought some of you might like these.

If you like Fannie Flagg try:

Jan Karon
Rebecca Wells
T R Pearson
Bailey White
Linda Ashour
Deborah Smith
Pamela Duncan
Suzanne Shea
Ann Ross
Karin Gillespie
Jill McCorkle
Dorothy Garlock
Garrison Keillor
Billie Letts
Annie Proulx
Sue Monk Kidd
Adriana Trigiani
Bailey White


Fron here:
http://http://anniston.lib.al.us/readalikes.htm#name

I whole heartedly agree with this statement and have read half the women on this list LOL I just have too much time on my hands LOL ....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-04-2014, 09:50 PM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,843,617 times
Reputation: 5201
I just finished~ In the Neighborhood: The Search for Community on an American Street, One Sleepover at a Time by Peter Lovenheim

After a tragic murder-suicide in his neighborhood, Lovenheim feels compelled to learn if closer relationships among neighbors might have saved a woman from death. The cultural study that follows is as much about sociology as it is about simple friendship as Lovenheim wonders why people can live side-by-side and know literally nothing about each other. He engages in long conversations both with those he has known (at least casually) for years and others he has never met. A retired doctor, harried real-estate agent, workaholic consultant, pathologist, radiologist fighting cancer, dog walkers, and others allow him into their homes and, at least a little bit, their hearts. He meets families and pets and witnesses daily routines, asking repeatedly just what it is that makes a place a home and a street more than merely an address. He reaches out and finds others also searching for connection and longing for what used to be. Lovenheim advances ideas about isolation in the modern world, and why a welcoming front
porch is needed now more than ever.


Now I want to read~ Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community by Robert D. Putnam 554 pgs
Drawing on vast new data that reveal Americans’ changing behavior, Putnam shows how we have become increasingly disconnected from one another and how social structures—whether they be PTA, church, or political parties—have disintegrated. Until the publication of this groundbreaking work, no one had so deftly diagnosed the harm that these broken bonds have wreaked on our physical and civic health, nor had anyone exalted their fundamental power in creating a society that is happy, healthy, and safe.

and

Better Together: Restoring the American Community by Robert D. Putnam 336 pgs
In his acclaimed Bowling Alone, Robert Putnam describes the United States as a nation in which we have become increasingly disconnected from one another and in which our social structures have disintegrated. But in the final chapter of that book he detects hopeful signs of civic renewal. In Better Together Putnam and coauthor Lewis Feldstein tell the inspiring stories of people who are reweaving the social fabric by bringing their own communities together or building bridges to others.
Better Together examines how people across the country are inventing new forms of social activism and community renewal. An arts program in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, brings together shipyard workers and their gentrified neighbors; a deteriorating, crime-ridden neighborhood in Boston is transformed by a determined group of civic organizers; an online "virtual" community in San Francisco allows its members to connect with each other as well as the larger group; in Wisconsin schoolchildren learn how to participate in the political process to benefit their town. As our society grows increasingly diverse, say Putnam and Feldstein, it's more important than ever to grow "social capital," whether by traditional or more innovative means. The people profiled in Better Together are doing just that, and their stories illustrate the extraordinary power of social networks for enabling people to improve their lives and the lives of those around them.

I totally believe that our self-imposed isolation from our neighbors is what has caused the breakdown of American society. It probably started with bringing television into our homes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Someplace Wonderful
5,177 posts, read 4,789,220 times
Reputation: 2587
At this time I am reading Coming Apart, by William L. O'Neill. Not to be confused with the excellent book of the same title by Charles Murray, which I am also reading.

O'Neill's book is a history of the 60's, published in 1971, and particularly fascinating given the perspective of many years later. Well worth a look for those interested in the period piece that the 60's are to many of us boomers
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
I totally believe that our self-imposed isolation from our neighbors is what has caused the breakdown of American society. It probably started with bringing television into our homes.

Thanks for your reviews.

No worries here…my husband calls me the neighborhood yenta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I whole heartedly agree with this statement and have read half the women on this list LOL I just have too much time on my hands LOL ....
LOL…it looks like you have some more authors to check out
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 05:38 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
Reputation: 8481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
I had heard the Orphan Train recommended and I know my sister mentioned that her book club read it and it was very good. So I reserved it at the library and just picked it up this week and began reading it. It's really very interesting historical fiction (and I seem to have been reading a bunch about this time period over the last few months so it is resonating.). I am enjoying it though really just still at the beginning...................I don't know why I guess I was curious to see the review so I looked it up on amazon, and lo and behold there must be like 20 books with this title. The one I am reading was published in 1979 (by James Magnussen and Dorothea Petrie). I mentioned this to my sister, and her book club read the much newer, more popular (now I know this one by Christina Baker Kline.
I just thought this was cute anecdote. It never ever occurred to me to think to verify the authors! So I hope to finish this one and I guess I will read the other one.
So let me update on my reading the "wrong" ORPHAN TRAIN. (and let it be noted that I have not yet read the newer one as that one has many many holds at the library. I should have noticed when I reserved it and I got notice the next day that the book was ready for pick up..
The one I read, by Magnussen and Petrie was a really fine read. I love historical fiction and this was really quite full of (interesting) facts and even went a bit further to place it time wise which I appreciated. I love history now, but in high school I remember finding it very boring; just a recitation of dates and places and events with little connection. Again I can't say if there are liberties taken in placing certain events together in the book, but it made for a very good story.
I actually was tearing up at points in the book.
I highly recommend this one, and will now reserve the other (more popular) one and at some point let you know what I think.
I did want to give this a boost because it's older and probably no one reads it now, but it was a very worthwhile and enjoyable read.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
After more than a week of computer problems I finally managed to fix it. Yippee! Anyway, that didn't affect my Kindle and so I read The Hollow World by Michael J. Sullivan, whom I had never heard of. The premise of the book sounded very interesting - like a mixture of science fiction coupled with something dystopian and I read the sample and then bought the book. What was a turn-off to me was that there was some mention under the book description of a g-rated version of the book being available - which made no sense to me at all because who writes two versions of the same book?

Anyway, I still took a chance and it seems that the author has concluded that a regular book version contains regular swearing - not excessive swearing but normal swearing, like people talk. And just as I was thinking this was one very long book based on the percentage I had read, it ended and I had the option of reading a book without swearing (???). Which I didn't bother to read.

So that was very, very odd but don't let that turn you off of reading this book - I LOVED the story. The guy can really write. And there is not excessive swearing in the normal book, so I don't know why he would do what he did - maybe there is something in the cleaned up version that is different and maybe there is someone here who will read it - in which case, I hope they enlighten me as to what that is about exactly.
Hollow World: Michael J. Sullivan: 9781616961831: Amazon.com: Books

So now I have yard work to do but I am also reading Greg Iles' new book, Natchez Burning.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
After another bunch of starts and tossing aside because I wasn't into them (Cambridge; Clever Girl; and Stella Descending), I settled on Looking for Alaska by John Green. I'm more than 60% done and it's good. It's not The Fault in Our Stars good (that was GREAT), but it's good. I wonder if reading an author's opus first sets you up for failure with their other books? I don't know. Or maybe I feel like all his characters are the same kids plunked into different situations? No, that's not it -- Hazel and Augustus were unique. Maybe I just feel like the kids in his other books just aren't as amazing as Hazel and Augustus? I don't know. Looking for Alaska has at least got me enough into it to finish it -- and enjoy it! -- unlike the false starts of the last few days. So there's that...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-05-2014, 05:40 PM
 
2,499 posts, read 2,625,860 times
Reputation: 1789
Just finished The Martian by Andy Weir. Really enjoyed it. I do not generally read SF.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-06-2014, 04:23 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
After another bunch of starts and tossing aside because I wasn't into them (Cambridge; Clever Girl; and Stella Descending), I settled on Looking for Alaska by John Green. I'm more than 60% done and it's good. It's not The Fault in Our Stars good (that was GREAT), but it's good. I wonder if reading an author's opus first sets you up for failure with their other books? I don't know. Or maybe I feel like all his characters are the same kids plunked into different situations? No, that's not it -- Hazel and Augustus were unique. Maybe I just feel like the kids in his other books just aren't as amazing as Hazel and Augustus? I don't know. Looking for Alaska has at least got me enough into it to finish it -- and enjoy it! -- unlike the false starts of the last few days. So there's that...

I read John Greene books in the opposite order. By the time I got to The Fault In Our Stars it was the best of the bunch. Unfortunately I am not as over the top about it as so many are


I am looking forward to The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion. I just got it from my library.

Amazon.com: The Rosie Project: A Novel (9781476729084): Graeme Simsion: Books
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top