Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-09-2014, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,312,432 times
Reputation: 62766

Advertisements

I seem to be going through a period of rereading books.

Right now I am rereading Beautiful Boy - A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction by David Sheff. It's nonfiction and one of the best books I have ever read. The author is a journalist and his writing just floats off the page.

The story itself is a heartbreaker. His research into how to deal with his son is well presented and thorough. One of the main characters in the book is the beautiful landscape/seascape in Inverness, California. The countryside and the ocean are so soothing and the reader experiences the knowledge that no matter how dynamic and serene love is, how encompassing it is, there is great turmoil below the surface just as there is below the surface of a smooth sea.

The book was a major best seller a few years ago. It's well worth a read.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2014, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I seem to be going through a period of rereading books.

Right now I am rereading Beautiful Boy - A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction by David Sheff. It's nonfiction and one of the best books I have ever read. The author is a journalist and his writing just floats off the page.

The story itself is a heartbreaker. His research into how to deal with his son is well presented and thorough. One of the main characters in the book is the beautiful landscape/seascape in Inverness, California. The countryside and the ocean are so soothing and the reader experiences the knowledge that no matter how dynamic and serene love is, how encompassing it is, there is great turmoil below the surface just as there is below the surface of a smooth sea.

The book was a major best seller a few years ago. It's well worth a read.
K's right; it's a great book. She made me read it. Well, no, she didn't hold a gun to my head or anything. She's too sweet for that. But she said something like, "You really want to read this book, Dawn. Trust me. Go read it. Now. I'll wait. Go! Why are you still standing there??? GO READ IT!" So I did. Terrific book.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,513 posts, read 6,374,142 times
Reputation: 7627
RE: Beautiful Boy by David Sheff

Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
"You really want to read this book, Dawn. Trust me. Go read it. Now. I'll wait. Go! Why are you still standing there??? GO READ IT!" So I did. Terrific book.
I can picture her standing there, arms crossed, foot tapping impatiently, a bit of scowl, yeah I'd go read the book and I just checked my library and they do have a copy at my branch. I'd best check it out when I finish all the current books I have from them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
RE: Beautiful Boy by David Sheff



I can picture her standing there, arms crossed, foot tapping impatiently, a bit of scowl, yeah I'd go read the book and I just checked my library and they do have a copy at my branch. I'd best check it out when I finish all the current books I have from them.
Hahaha! Yes, you'd best. Otherwise? The wrath of K is upon you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 09:02 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,180,430 times
Reputation: 37885
I am reading The Silver Swan, a mystery written by John Banville some years ago under the name of Benjamin Black. It is the second in a series of eight (?) that the wrote before abandoning them.

I thought this and the first one nothing short of terrific. I am ambivalent about John Banville's other books (though I am a great fan of Mephisto), but these I would say "Go for 'em," if you like mysteries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,314,019 times
Reputation: 9858
Okay, well, this is what happened. I had started We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves and then I got a three day migraine. So I didn't read much and so far, which isn't very far, I am not sure how much I am liking the book anyway. It could be that I'm not far enough and it could be that the first person isn't my favourite form, and it could be that I found the way the story was entered awkward, or a combination of all those things. Or it could be the right book at the wrong time.

So then I noticed that Lev Grossman came out with the third book of his Magician triology, and breaking my rule once again, not to buy any more books until I have finished at least some of the books I already have, I bought it. And I bought it even though I didn't really care for the second book of the trilogy. I don't know what it was. I had loved the first book. It was a grown-up version of Harry Potter. Well, I am not that far into The Magician's Land, book three - page 80 or thereabouts - and I so far completely love it.

After reading book two, I had started to wonder what I had been drinking when I read book one that I had thought the book was so good and reading book two had me doubting my impression of book one. But book three makes me feel like, nope, book one must really have been good. He writes above his genre. That is the thing. I am not a fan per se, of science fiction or fantasy or anything else for that matter, on the basis of the genre itself, but rather I am a fan of those writers whose writing transcends the genre. And so far at least, Grossman seems to have paid attention to language and not rushed through the writing of the book for the sake of finishing it and riding on the popularity of the first book.

Here is a short line that gives nothing away, but which all book-lovers will understand; it is my new, favourite quote:

"It didn't matter where you were, if you were in a room full of books you were at least halfway home".

Sniffle. That is so true, so true, I said to myself as I held an ice pack to my head.

Anyway, now I have work to do so I can't absorb myself in the book. But I know there were other Grossman fans out there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Okay, well, this is what happened. I had started We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves and then I got a three day migraine. So I didn't read much and so far, which isn't very far, I am not sure how much I am liking the book anyway. It could be that I'm not far enough and it could be that the first person isn't my favourite form, and it could be that I found the way the story was entered awkward, or a combination of all those things. Or it could be the right book at the wrong time.

So then I noticed that Lev Grossman came out with the third book of his Magician triology, and breaking my rule once again, not to buy any more books until I have finished at least some of the books I already have, I bought it. And I bought it even though I didn't really care for the second book of the trilogy. I don't know what it was. I had loved the first book. It was a grown-up version of Harry Potter. Well, I am not that far into The Magician's Land, book three - page 80 or thereabouts - and I so far completely love it.

After reading book two, I had started to wonder what I had been drinking when I read book one that I had thought the book was so good and reading book two had me doubting my impression of book one. But book three makes me feel like, nope, book one must really have been good. He writes above his genre. That is the thing. I am not a fan per se, of science fiction or fantasy or anything else for that matter, on the basis of the genre itself, but rather I am a fan of those writers whose writing transcends the genre. And so far at least, Grossman seems to have paid attention to language and not rushed through the writing of the book for the sake of finishing it and riding on the popularity of the first book.

Here is a short line that gives nothing away, but which all book-lovers will understand; it is my new, favourite quote:

"It didn't matter where you were, if you were in a room full of books you were at least halfway home".

Sniffle. That is so true, so true, I said to myself as I held an ice pack to my head.

Anyway, now I have work to do so I can't absorb myself in the book. But I know there were other Grossman fans out there.
I love how YOU write.

And I love that quote too.

And I started We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves the minute that it was released and got, I don't know, 50 pages in, and bailed on it.

So there's that.

And, mostly, I hope that your migraine -- which has come BACK?? -- goes away again. I told you already: no computer time while you have a headache, Lovey, and that means no books either. Eyes closed, dark room, no noise. And, um, no WORK either. Sheesh. xxo

***

I finished The Girl Next Door. Oh, gosh. If it was just a novel, I wouldn't have read it. Because it's based on a true story, it was vile.

Now, for a light read while I'm in a work crunch, I'm reading a YA novel: We Were Liars. It's a very light read, very YA, and I'm interested in where the story leads.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
48,518 posts, read 34,807,002 times
Reputation: 73729
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Zugor: I just Goodreads now. With so many recommendations from this forum, I just cannot keep up with all the titles. I also review each that I read or leave unfinished so I can refer back to the entries later if I wish. I especially like Goodreads because I can follow authors I like, keep track of where I am in an author's series, but most importantly: they have an app for my cell phone (android) that allows me to capture books I see at bookstores when I don't have the money to buy them all.

Thanks for the summary of benefits to Goodreads. I signed up and did a bunch of stuff with it, but you taught me more!

Right now I'm reading Furies of Calderon by Jim Butcher (love) and Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, by Malcolm Gladwell (love everything by him)
__________________
____________________________________________
My posts as a Mod will always be in red.
Be sure to review Terms of Service: TOS
And check this out: FAQ
Moderator: Relationships Forum / Hawaii Forum / Dogs / Pets / Current Events
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 04:45 PM
 
9,238 posts, read 22,889,092 times
Reputation: 22699
Just finished The Secret Keeper by Kate Morton. Wow. This definitely makes my top-20 fiction books, books I'd risk my life to save in a disaster.

I read Morton's The Distant Hours and The Forgotten Garden, and I enjoyed them a lot. But this last book is far above those. (I haven't yet read her first book).

It's sort of a mystery, but not a detectivey-crime-type mystery. More like a mystery of unraveling old family secrets (which Morton seems to excel in). It flips back and forth from WWII London to the modern day, but it doesn't feel jumpy or gimmicky. The historical aspects of it compelled me to read more about the London Blitz, and Morton seems to have researched extensively.

For those of you who like to skip ahead and read for surprises at the end of a book, DON'T. This book is best enjoyed if you resist the urge to peek ahead, and just let the answers unfold in order. Even after you think you've gotten to the main climax and you've gotten the big answers, you then get even more truths revealed all the way until the end. I cried through the last 20 or so pages, even after I thought the mystery was solved.

This book was so satisfying. Yes, satisfying with historical accuracy, satisfying with character "unveiling," and satisfying with its images. But also satisfying to the people like me, who hate loose ends. You know when you read a long multi-generational story that has elements of mystery, and you get to the end, the main questions are tied up, but then you think "but what about x? and what about y?" and "but what ever happened with that xyz situation?" Well, this book ties up every loose end you could possibly be wondering about, even some you might not have paid much attention to. The only negative I can remark on is that there are a few incredible coincidences that occur, but my "satisfaction" with where they led outweighed any annoyance I would have had otherwise.

My two favorite books I've read this year were this one and Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch. Even though they are both stories of solving a mystery from the past, and they are both descriptive and well-written, they are very different. The Goldfinch was what I would call more "artistic" for lack of a better word, and I know that tuned off some people, as Tartt painted a huge painting with teeny tiny little brush strokes. The Secret Keeper doesn't have that artistic feel at all--and that's neither a plus nor a minus. There are no meandering tangents, and the book isn't very long. Every scene "counts" and nothing is extraneous. I would almost say it's a "roller coaster" ride, but there is no real excitement or thrilling action. It's more a roller-coaster ride that's internal and oddly cozy. So no, this is not a Pulitzer candidate, but if there were a TracySam prize, this would be a contender.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2014, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,252,678 times
Reputation: 3809
As a reader who was totally enthralled with Tom Rachman's first book, The Imperfectionists, I was sadly disappointed with his latest, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers. Rachman attempts to build suspense throughout where there is really none. It was hard to believe The Imperfectionist was a work of fiction because both the newsroom setting and characters were so realistic. Rachman's writing is still good, but he withheld information easily knowable and then rushed the last fifty pages. It was a cheap trick. My advice would be to read the first couple chapters and the last 50 pages. Skip the middle of the book.

Little Bee by Chris Cleaver Even though it was quite disturbing, I was captivated by the first few chapters of the book Here, Little Bee was a realistic, believable narrator. It went downhill from there. The characters were so inconsistent and unbelievable, including Little Bee. The dialogue and actions changed from literally page to page. There were scenes, especially one, that was totally unbelievable. The writing was mediocre. Another Kite Runner. I think not.

Thursdays in the Park by Hilary Boyd. I thought this book might be like Major Pettigrew's Last Stand, a book about love found in the twilight years. But, it was not. The characters were just plain annoying, especially the narrator. Most of the characters were not likeable. The main character so indecisive and wishy washy. I don't know why I finished this book.

We Are Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler. I liked this book although parts were very sad especially how different family members reacted to a certain occurrence in the book. The early relationship between the two sisters was fun to read. I put this book on hold awhile ago, but I did not remember the premise. Apparently, too much info was released about the book. It was a surprise for me. In a few places the book was very technical which disrupted the flow of the story, but only a minor criticism.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top