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Old 10-06-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
Reputation: 3809

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Okay. So. I just finished The Good House by Ann Leary. Despite loving her husband, Denis, I was fully prepared to hate this book. I was fully prepared to give up on it early on. Neither of those things happened. I won't bother talking about how it's lighter fare than I typically enjoy, that I don't like "funny" books, because this book wasn't completely light (it was just written with a light [and lovely] touch) and the "funny" was quite funny in a sarcastic, dry way (my favorite type of humor).

The main reason that I really (really!) liked this book was because I absolutely LOVED Hildy. I can't remember the last book that I read in which a character seemed so real to me. I know people like her. I *am* people like her sometimes. I wanted to hug her (y'know... I mean... if she'd *let* me) so many times. Ann Leary drew a fabulous character in Hildy. LOVE!

Next up: The Obituary Writer by Ann Hood.
Dawn, you might like this one from Leary, An Innocent, a Broad. Dennis was performing in the U.K and Ann, pregnant with their first child, accompanied him with plans to return to the U.S in a week. Those plans changed when the baby started to come early. The book is well written, and Leary has a wonderful sense of humor. I liked the comparisons made between U.S. and U.K's health systems. I've downloaded her other book, Outtakes from a Marriage.
OT, Dennis and Jon Stewart are hysterically funny when together. I'm also a Rescue Me fan.
I had The Great House from the library, but don't remember finishing. I'll have to check it out again. Also, did not finish The Obituary Writer.
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Old 10-06-2014, 03:37 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,091 posts, read 15,429,770 times
Reputation: 15038
Just started a freebie ...
A Soft Place to Fall by Barbara Bretton

So far so good.
Lots of little 'funny' parts so far.
Although I'm glad I don't get drunk as easily as Annie does! Oh my.
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Old 10-06-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
Reputation: 3809
Here's some books I enjoyed:
The Salinger Contract and The Thieves of Manhattan by Adam Langer
After I read the Salinger Contract, I immediately downloaded his first book and very clever. Langer's wit is exactly up my alley. Both are about the book publishing industry

The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair byJoel Dicker. The book is very popular in Europe. If you read Amazon reviews, not a hit in the U.S. I think readers may have taken this book too seriously. I don't know whether to classify it as a mystery or an indictment of the publishing industry, maybe both. Very enjoyable with a kooky but interesting cast of characters.

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng. A debut novel from this author about a dysfunctional family who experience a death in the family. The story is told from four different viewpoints. Well written with very developed characters. I expect more good things from this young author.

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. I was immediately drawn to this compelling story about a wealthy family summering in Martha's Vineyard. I don't want to give too much away. Suffice it to say, it is beautifully written with a unforeseen ending. I could not put this book down.

Presently reading Factory Man, a non-fiction book by Beth Macy. The book is about the about the decline of furniture manufacturing in the south and how manufacturers were forced to send production overseas in order to compete with Asia. John Bassett III decided to fight back and saved hundreds jobs over here. To be honest, I started to skip some parts at the beginning because so many of the stories about the Bassett family were repetitious. I'm now into the meat of the book describing Bassett's process, and it's fascinating to see how Bassett's cunning maneuvers saved American jobs.
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
Dawn, you might like this one from Leary, An Innocent, a Broad. Dennis was performing in the U.K and Ann, pregnant with their first child, accompanied him with plans to return to the U.S in a week. Those plans changed when the baby started to come early. The book is well written, and Leary has a wonderful sense of humor. I liked the comparisons made between U.S. and U.K's health systems. I've downloaded her other book, Outtakes from a Marriage.
OT, Dennis and Jon Stewart are hysterically funny when together. I'm also a Rescue Me fan.
I had The Great House from the library, but don't remember finishing. I'll have to check it out again. Also, did not finish The Obituary Writer.
I tried both of those before starting The Good House and I couldn't get into either of them. Maybe I'll try them again some day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart. I was immediately drawn to this compelling story about a wealthy family summering in Martha's Vineyard. I don't want to give too much away. Suffice it to say, it is beautifully written with a unforeseen ending. I could not put this book down.
I really liked that book!
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,301 times
Reputation: 1205
just finished The Scorch Trials by James Dashner its the second book in The Maze Runner series
really good and interesting with lots of surprising twists and turns
hoping to get the third book tomorrow!
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:47 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,049 times
Reputation: 5267
Slim pickings for new fiction at the library this week. The librarian tells me that when the weather gets chilly and rainy (which it was for a couple of days) the hordes descend. So I only came home with a few. The first one, Flying Shoes by Lisa Howorth was a no-go right from the start. Crude and unnecessarily vulgar writing which had me shutting the book pretty quickly. I'm no prude and I like crude and vulgar in the right place, done humorously and in the right context. Neither held true for this novel.

I did better with Chasing the Sun by Natalia Sylvester. I wasn't sure I could get into a book that deals with the kidnapping in Peru of a well-to-do businessman's wife but the story pretty quickly captured me. I had to keep reading to see how she fared and to see how the husband coped with the everyday life of running a house and raising two children, something totally foreign to him. Another first novel by a talented author.

I enjoyed the next book just as much, The Sixteenth of June, by Maya Lang. Fascinating characters, and most of the story takes place in one day, but that day resolves a lot of issues that had been simmering for years. Lots of introspection and character study and if you're looking for action, this isn't it! But a really marvelous unfolding of three interconnected lives and their families.

Back to the library tomorrow, the beautiful weather has returned, hopefully the books have too!
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Old 10-06-2014, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Slim pickings for new fiction at the library this week. The librarian tells me that when the weather gets chilly and rainy (which it was for a couple of days) the hordes descend. So I only came home with a few. The first one, Flying Shoes by Lisa Howorth was a no-go right from the start. Crude and unnecessarily vulgar writing which had me shutting the book pretty quickly. I'm no prude and I like crude and vulgar in the right place, done humorously and in the right context. Neither held true for this novel.

I did better with Chasing the Sun by Natalia Sylvester. I wasn't sure I could get into a book that deals with the kidnapping in Peru of a well-to-do businessman's wife but the story pretty quickly captured me. I had to keep reading to see how she fared and to see how the husband coped with the everyday life of running a house and raising two children, something totally foreign to him. Another first novel by a talented author.

I enjoyed the next book just as much, The Sixteenth of June, by Maya Lang. Fascinating characters, and most of the story takes place in one day, but that day resolves a lot of issues that had been simmering for years. Lots of introspection and character study and if you're looking for action, this isn't it! But a really marvelous unfolding of three interconnected lives and their families.

Back to the library tomorrow, the beautiful weather has returned, hopefully the books have too!
For slim pickings, you just added two -- the last two that you listed -- to my "to read" list. Thanks, I guess. (No, really... thanks. You can never be too rich, be too thin [please!], or have too many books.)

ETA: In an earlier post that you addressed to me, you said that you didn't finish The Obituary Writer. Well, I beat you. I didn't even START it. I just casually skimmed a few reviews -- I don't like to really read reviews because they usually tell me something about the story that I don't want to know beforehand -- and my eye caught the word "predictable" more that once. If there's anything that I can't stand more than predictability, I don't know what it is yet. All's (she says like she's a ranch hand ) I know is that I hate a predictable book. I'm glad that I didn't even bother starting it.

Netwit once recommended Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison. I remember starting it but then *things happened* (who knows what... maybe a move to a new house... maybe a divorce, I don't know) and I never got past the first chapter, I don't think. I'm going to try that one again now.

Last edited by DawnMTL; 10-06-2014 at 09:29 PM..
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Old 10-07-2014, 06:28 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,843,617 times
Reputation: 5201
Finished Skinwalkers (Navajo Mysteries Book 7) by Tony Hillerman but found it boring!The first third of the book was really tedious to read as the author filled pages with useless,BORING,and unnecessary info about every character introduced, about which clan/tribe they belonged too,that played absolutely no part in the story! zzzzzzzzzz!

Plus there were far too many Indian words that I couldn't even pronounce and did not know the definition of.

Never felt any urgency to turn the page and did not care about a single character.

Next up~The Jade Peony by Wayson Choy

http://www.amazon.com/Jade-Peony-Way...the+jade+peony

Also I feel a Halloween mood coming on[I love Halloween] so I know it's time for some fun-SPOOKY reading,and first up is the YA Horror Down a Dark Hall by Lois Duncan

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...Dark_Hall?ac=1

Last edited by i_love_autumn; 10-07-2014 at 06:51 AM..
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Old 10-07-2014, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,513 posts, read 6,374,594 times
Reputation: 7627
I quite enjoyed The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson. It was a light-hearted romp through one totally implausible scenario after another but great fun nevertheless.

I just finished The Quiet Streets of Winslow by Judy Troy. It's a murder mystery but a rather introspective one. Short chapters tell the story from the perspectives of the 3 main characters, Sam, the sheriff doing the investigating, the main suspect Nate, who was in love with the victim and Travis, Nate's younger half brother.

Next up is either Mudbound by Hillary Jordan, which I borrowed from the library or The Rescue at Dead Dog Beach by Stephen McGarva which I bought. I read the first 10 pages of Mudbound and it feels promising. The Rescue... is non-fiction. The author and his wife moved to Puerto Rico with expectations of fun and adventure and apparently got in to rescuing abandoned dogs, not something they had planned on at all. I think it will be one of those times when I've got two very different books in the works at the same time.

Is it just my imagination or are the number of interesting sounding titles being recommended here each week growing far faster than I can possibly read, even though I am retired with no spouse, kids or grandkids and can devote a lot of hours to reading?
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Old 10-07-2014, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Vermont
11,758 posts, read 14,647,352 times
Reputation: 18523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
That's why I don't want to do book groups.
I know, my loss, but I don't want to read what I don't want to read.
Actually, in general that's one of the main things I like about being in a book group.

If you're interested, I posted a review on Goodreads and on my blog:

Rational Resistance: What an awful, awful family.
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