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Old 10-13-2014, 03:07 PM
 
6,884 posts, read 7,496,384 times
Reputation: 21650

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About All the Light We Cannot See:

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
The first few chapters (short chapters, to be sure) were a little confusing and I wasn't really sure what direction the book was going. After "meeting" Werner and his sister as children, I was hooked. I thought it was such a beautiful book and feel like I have a picture of all of those places and people in my mind. Try to hang in there a bit longer...
Well, I did. I slogged through the book hoping to start liking it eventually. Blech, I never did.

So, it's interesting as to why we each like and dislike particular books.

I think I never could get excited about this book for a couple of reasons:

1) It's written in the present tense, a literary conceit that I find tiresome. Why a book set during WWII, which bounces back in forth in time, needed to be written in the "now", I don't know. Artists can do whatever they want, but not everyone is going to appreciate their choices.

2) It's set in France/Germany during WWII, which is a period that I've so overloaded on over the years (haven't we all?) that I just never want to read about that place or period ever again.

All of the kudos for this book remind me of the fact that movies about WWII/Nazis/War almost always win Oscars, even though they may not be the "best" movies produced, simply because we all feel as though we should be reminded of the significant issues of that period. A work of art which addresses an important issue doesn't equal an important work of art.

And, finally, the process of reading this book reminded me of the feeling I get when watching French films. Snnnkkkksnoreurpecchhhhguguhguh. Just shut up!!!

With all due respect to those of you who actually liked this one !
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Old 10-13-2014, 06:38 PM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,782,262 times
Reputation: 5201
Quote:
Originally Posted by f.2 View Post
The Hot Zone by Richard Preston. Nonfiction about the 1989 Virginia ebola-reston outbreak.

1989 ebola-reston outbreak

Ebola Reston Outbreaks, web.stanford.edu/
The Hot Zone is the most terrifying book that I have ever read! Read it decades ago,and never forgot it.His 'Demon In The Freezer' is also excellent.
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Old 10-13-2014, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,513 posts, read 6,336,941 times
Reputation: 7625
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
The Hot Zone is the most terrifying book that I have ever read! Read it decades ago,and never forgot it.His 'Demon In The Freezer' is also excellent.
Most virologists will tell you that his graphic, lurid descriptions are way over the top. Less than half of the people who die from Ebola have any internal hemorraging and organs don't "melt" as a result of this disease. that is why it is no longer called Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever.

Much better,in my opinion, and scarier too are three other books:

The Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett. It too was written in 1994 and she won a Pulitzer for Explanatory Journalism in 1996 for a series of articles about the Ebola outbreak in Zaire.

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen. 2012.

Level 4, virus hunters of the CDC by Joseph McCormick and Susan Fisher-Hoch Published in 1999.

I remember thinking that I would never want to work in a Level 4 lab but by the end of the book I thought that maybe the only safe place on the planet was inside them.
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Old 10-14-2014, 01:21 AM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,565,221 times
Reputation: 5261
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
A Man called Ove was just ok for me.Ove is the book's narrator and it is funny as he details his thoughts as he tries to commit suicide after the death of his wife,but keeps getting interrupted!

I was actually stunned when I discovered that he had been married,because I already thoroughly disliked him by then!I can't imagine anyone suffering through life married to such a person with OCD.

The book was funny,but also sad, and it felt too repetitious.I'm sure part of the problem was that I just did not like or care about the character of Ove.

I kept thinking how awful it must have been for his wife to have lived with such a person,and wondering what could possibly induce anyone to marry someone like him!

I'm afraid this is another that I couldn't bring myself to finish! Wow, there has been a lot of those lately.


Now I am about 1/2 of the way through Down a Dark Hall by Lois Duncan and it is quite engaging and creepy.
Aww, Autumn, I was hoping you'd like it! Maybe it resonated with me because a close relative has OCD and I think I found it funny how spot-on that condition was portrayed. I think she married him because those kinds of things aren't always obvious until you live with it. Before that, they're just odd little quirks? Better luck on your next read!

Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I know what you mean. I don't know if I am well on my way to Attention Deficeit Disorder, or the books being published are just meant for a different audience. I've left 33 books unfinished since I started tracking them in July 29, 2012.

Thanks for the recommend on "Down a Dark Hall." I've reserved it on my library's downloadables.
Mayberry, I'm convinced that our reading "tolerance" goes in spells. There are periods where I can't find a darn thing I like and then I'll go for weeks with only a dud or two. We aren't liable to stop trying though, are we?
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Old 10-14-2014, 01:40 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,782,262 times
Reputation: 5201
Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
Most virologists will tell you that his graphic, lurid descriptions are way over the top. Less than half of the people who die from Ebola have any internal hemorraging and organs don't "melt" as a result of this disease. that is why it is no longer called Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever.

Much better,in my opinion, and scarier too are three other books:

The Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett. It too was written in 1994 and she won a Pulitzer for Explanatory Journalism in 1996 for a series of articles about the Ebola outbreak in Zaire.

Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic by David Quammen. 2012.

Level 4, virus hunters of the CDC by Joseph McCormick and Susan Fisher-Hoch Published in 1999.

I remember thinking that I would never want to work in a Level 4 lab but by the end of the book I thought that maybe the only safe place on the planet was inside them.
Really? Only a single one of the1-2 star reviews for Hot Zone accuse it of being untrue and that one mentions the book~"Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC " and I'm afraid I believe nothing that comes out of the CDC or WHO!

Hot Zone has 1,092 customer reviews,only 57 of those are 1-2 stars.Demon In The Freezer has 251 customer reviews with only 7... 1-2 star reviews! I love both books and they will always be special to me,and evidently to many other readers,as well.
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Old 10-14-2014, 02:10 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,782,262 times
Reputation: 5201
Originally Posted by Lost Roses

Quote:
Aww, Autumn, I was hoping you'd like it! Maybe it resonated with me because a close relative has OCD and I think I found it funny how spot-on that condition was portrayed. I think she married him because those kinds of things aren't always obvious until you live with it. Before that, they're just odd little quirks? Better luck on your next read!
I also thought for sure that I would really like A Man Called Ove ,but I do have a really low tolerance for aggravating,SNARKY,people like the woman-Hyacinth Bucket (who insists that her surname is pronounced "Bouquet") on the Brit-Com Keeping Up Appearances, and Estelle Getty who played Sophia, Bea Arthur's character of Dorothy Zbornak's mother on the Golden Girls, or those like Joan Rivers,Don Rickles.I never could stand people like them,but many people find them hilarious,so I won't be at all surprised if YoungLisa7 enjoys it very much.

I also agree that our tolerance or moods vary towards our reading. I know for a fact that I surprised myself by totally loving the Regency Romance -Edenbrooke by Julianne Donaldson,because I know that normally I would have thought that the 17 year old heroine's habit of 'twirling' was just too silly to believe,yet I found her character endearing and her 'twirling' believable and tolerable,and accepted that the hero did not find it ridiculous!
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:36 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 23,904,585 times
Reputation: 27090
hi all has anyone ever read " The miraculous journey of Edward Tulane " ? I just ordered it and am looking forward to reading it ...thanks in advance for any help you can offer.
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
2,218 posts, read 3,431,240 times
Reputation: 6035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I gave up on Sycamore Row by John Grisham. Boring, one-dimensional characters with an extremely predictable plot.

I picked up Scorpions by Noah Feldman which is a biography of four of the Supreme Court justices appointed by Franklin Roosevelt and the influence they had on modern society. I wear my geek mantle proudly.
Wow, really? I loved Sycamore Row!!
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Living near our Nation's Capitol since 2010
2,218 posts, read 3,431,240 times
Reputation: 6035
I am just finishing WHAT ALICE FORGOT by the same woman who wrote THE HUSBAND'S SECRET. I LOVE it. She is such a great author. I highly recommend her books.
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Old 10-14-2014, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,802,760 times
Reputation: 28897
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
hi all has anyone ever read " The miraculous journey of Edward Tulane " ? I just ordered it and am looking forward to reading it ...thanks in advance for any help you can offer.
Are you sure that's the name of the book? I just looked it up and in one editorial review, it was listed as for readers in Grades 3 to 6. In another, it was listed for Grades 2 to 4. It's not even Young Adult... it's just Young.
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