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Old 10-20-2014, 06:58 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,843 posts, read 3,057,498 times
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See Jane Run by Joy Fielding. It's quite the mystery/page turner and well written, but I suspect I've already figured out the mystery. I hate when I do that. I guess I'll find out.
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Old 10-20-2014, 08:10 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
I may give up on Americanah. I sort of hate to because it's well-written and partly set in Nigeria which is interesting, but the story itself, at least so far, is kind of boring. I don't care much what happens to any of the characters and I feel like I've read many similar books. But....I haven't completely made up my mind.
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Old 10-20-2014, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I may give up on Americanah. I sort of hate to because it's well-written and partly set in Nigeria which is interesting, but the story itself, at least so far, is kind of boring. I don't care much what happens to any of the characters and I feel like I've read many similar books. But....I haven't completely made up my mind.
Well, this doesn't bode well for my liking it... when I get around to starting it, I mean.
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Old 10-20-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Woodinville
3,184 posts, read 4,845,493 times
Reputation: 6283
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson.

He tells a lot of interesting stories about the history of various sciences. He's not technical though, so I often find myself annoyed when he glances over some useful technical info that could be interesting. I like his writing style though.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:06 AM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,506 times
Reputation: 5267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfunkle524 View Post
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson.

He tells a lot of interesting stories about the history of various sciences. He's not technical though, so I often find myself annoyed when he glances over some useful technical info that could be interesting. I like his writing style though.
That was good but not nearly his best. Notes From a Small Island is one of the most entertaining reads I've ever had. Helps to be an Anglophile or at least appreciate the quirks and oddities of England. And it really plays up Bryson's writing skills. Such a fun read.
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Old 10-20-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Looking to take a breather from darker stories, I came across this short (240 pages) book called The Full Ridiculous. I read the first page and just kept going. I'm only 12% in but I *love* his writing style.

http://www.amazon.com/Full-Ridiculou...ull+ridiculous
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Old 10-20-2014, 11:28 AM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,506 times
Reputation: 5267
Last review from my most recent stack of library books. The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai. This one had a timeline I don't often see. A huge estate and the characters that occupy it in 1999 comprise the first part of the book about a house that had been both private home and later, an artists' colony, and then private home again. Lots of intertwining characters and seemingly mundane things, UNTIL you get to the second part which takes you back 44 years and then you begin to understand some of the little mysteries that abound.

Then you go back another 24 years to 1929, and then all the way to 1900. Unfolding stories and revelations along the way. It's more character driven than anything but I totally enjoyed it and wished I had paid closer attention to details in the first part of the book.

Then I wondered how it would have been if I had read it chronologically from back to front and no, it wouldn't have worked! The surprises are the making of this book.
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Old 10-20-2014, 12:26 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Looking to take a breather from darker stories, I came across this short (240 pages) book called The Full Ridiculous. I read the first page and just kept going. I'm only 12% in but I *love* his writing style.

http://www.amazon.com/Full-Ridiculou...ull+ridiculous
That does look fun. Just put it on the list.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:45 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrsydevil82 View Post
See Jane Run by Joy Fielding. It's quite the mystery/page turner and well written, but I suspect I've already figured out the mystery. I hate when I do that. I guess I'll find out.
I hope you are wrong because I hate that too, but often I find that I was wrong and then I am happy again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I may give up on Americanah. ... I don't care much what happens to any of the characters ....
That was why I dropped it. I just didn't care.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Last review from my most recent stack of library books. The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai. This one had a timeline I don't often see. A huge estate and the characters that occupy it in 1999 comprise the first part of the book about a house that had been both private home and later, an artists' colony, and then private home again. Lots of intertwining characters and seemingly mundane things, UNTIL you get to the second part which takes you back 44 years and then you begin to understand some of the little mysteries that abound.

Then you go back another 24 years to 1929, and then all the way to 1900. Unfolding stories and revelations along the way. It's more character driven than anything but I totally enjoyed it and wished I had paid closer attention to details in the first part of the book.

Then I wondered how it would have been if I had read it chronologically from back to front and no, it wouldn't have worked! The surprises are the making of this book.
That sounds fun and I added it to my list.

I just finished listening to "The House on Tradd Street" by Karen White, mentioned earlier. It was a romantic cozy mystery ghost story, with no thrill, and lots and lots of details about houses (set in Charleston). Probably I will read the second in the series, but only because I want to find out if Melanie and Jack become ghost busters, or sleuths, or just romantically involved -- and I liked the dog.

"The Thirteenth Tale" continues to attract me to keep turning pages, and now that I am done knitting that mantilla I may have more time to read it through.
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Old 10-20-2014, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Looking to take a breather from darker stories, I came across this short (240 pages) book called The Full Ridiculous. I read the first page and just kept going. I'm only 12% in but I *love* his writing style.

The Full Ridiculous: A Novel - Kindle edition by Mark Lamprell. Literature & Fiction Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
That does look fun. Just put it on the list.
It really is. He's dealing with some serious issues, mind you, but it's a fun read. I'm 50% in now and I still like his writing style. Many complained about it being in third person but, for whatever reason, it works.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Last review from my most recent stack of library books. The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai. This one had a timeline I don't often see. A huge estate and the characters that occupy it in 1999 comprise the first part of the book about a house that had been both private home and later, an artists' colony, and then private home again. Lots of intertwining characters and seemingly mundane things, UNTIL you get to the second part which takes you back 44 years and then you begin to understand some of the little mysteries that abound.

Then you go back another 24 years to 1929, and then all the way to 1900. Unfolding stories and revelations along the way. It's more character driven than anything but I totally enjoyed it and wished I had paid closer attention to details in the first part of the book.

Then I wondered how it would have been if I had read it chronologically from back to front and no, it wouldn't have worked! The surprises are the making of this book.
Aaaaand another one to add to my list. Thanks!
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