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Old 12-29-2014, 03:18 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,598,492 times
Reputation: 5267

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I think that's the first of the Three Pines mysteries, the characters really develop as the series goes on. Interestingly, I've just discovered that a made-for-TV movie of Still Life was produced in 2013. From the reviews on IMDB, most people are disappointed. Just glancing at the actors' photos my thought is "that's not how I pictured them!"
Does anyone remember this conversation about the movie made from Louise Penny's Still Life? I finally had a chance to watch it and I have to eat my words about mis-casting of the characters. Armand Gamache is played by the same actor who portrays Inspector Lynley in the BBC series, so he's got the chief detective thing down pat. Jean-Guy is dead-on, and so are most of the rest of the cast.

The only things I thought weren't quite right is that I would have pegged the painter husband and wife, Peter and Clara Morrow as being about ten years older in my mind and the impression I got from the books. Myrna, the bookshop owner, didn't have a speaking part but was present in some scenes. She is not the same at all, unless I'm mistaken I thought Louise Penny made her a rather heavy woman but not so in the movie. Ruth Zardo is perfect!

There are some nice special features included too, so don't miss them if you get a chance to watch the movie. I got my copy from the local library. And I think the people who didn't like the movie aren't familiar with the novels - I was very pleased to see this one brought to life and I hope they do more!
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Old 12-29-2014, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,361,433 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I just finished The Stupidest Angel by Christopher Moore and it was funny--silly even. Most of his books are like that, but with underlying heart. They do contain bawdy sexual humor and cursing, which some people find offensive, but it's all in a Monty Python sort of way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I really enjoy Moore's books. My personal favorite is Lamb - The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal.
Thank you for those. I have never read any of Christopher Moore's books. I just requested Lamb from my library


I finished Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks. It didn't live up to it's reviews for me. Maybe it's because I never had an imaginary friend. Anyway it was a cute kind of story told from the point of view of the imaginary friend, Budo.


I just started Cinnamon and Gunpowder by Eli Brown which is way out of character for me. Here is the description:
"The year is 1819, and the renowned chef Owen Wedgwood has been kidnapped by the ruthless pirate Mad Hannah Mabbot. He will be spared, she tells him, as long as he puts exquisite food in front of her every Sunday without fail.
To appease the red-haired captain, Wedgwood gets cracking with the meager supplies on board. His first triumph at sea is actual bread, made from a sourdough starter that he leavens in a tin under his shirt throughout a roaring battle, as men are cutlassed all around him. Soon he’s making tea-smoked eel and brewing pineapple-banana cider.
But Mabbot—who exerts a curious draw on the chef—is under siege. Hunted by a deadly privateer and plagued by a saboteur hidden on her ship, she pushes her crew past exhaustion in her search for the notorious Brass Fox. As Wedgwood begins to sense a method to Mabbot’s madness, he must rely on the bizarre crewmembers he once feared: Mr. Apples, the fearsome giant who loves to knit; Feng and Bai, martial arts masters sworn to defend their captain; and Joshua, the deaf cabin boy who becomes the son Wedgwood never had."
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Old 12-29-2014, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Kirkwood, DE and beautiful SXM!
12,054 posts, read 23,322,336 times
Reputation: 31918
The Tides of Wishing Rock, which is the last book in the trilogy. Loved this series and it is very different from what I usually read. The book is all e-mails and texts between the characters, most of whom live in one condo building on an island near Seattle. Just a nice read.
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Old 12-29-2014, 08:46 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,921,934 times
Reputation: 7237
I have figured out why I put Anatomy of a Kidnapping in my Amazon cart. AFter reading a few chapters, I decided that Dr. Berk and Dr. Abraham Verghese (The Tennis Partner, Cutting for Stone) must have been infectious disease colleagues in East Tennessee. I must have read a recommendation by Abraham Verghese for the Berk book on Goodreads or Facebook or some other social media site.

Unfortunately, Dr. Berk is not half the author that Dr. Verghese is.

By the way, if you have not read The Tennis Partner, check it out. It is the true story of a drug addicted physician and is written in a non-judgmental, compassionate way.
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Old 12-29-2014, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,284 posts, read 9,294,568 times
Reputation: 9833
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
I just finished Station Eleven which is an apocalyptic novel. It starts out with a man playing King Lear on stage. He has a heart attack and dies just before 99% of the world's population is wiped out from the Georgia Flu. The book takes you through the lives of the some of the people who knew the man on stage for the next twenty years. I loved how the story intertwined the characters throughout the book and brought it all together.


I'm only a few pages into Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend. It's about an autistic boy who has an imaginary friend who helps him with the "outside" world. Supposedly I should get the tissues out. We'll see.
I saw this(Station Eleven) a few days ago and thought it sounded interesting. I downloaded the sample and then I bought it. Thank you very much for mentioning it. It's the first book I've finished in a long time. It's not a typical post-apocalyptic popular fiction type of book. Those who like a bit of the literary in their reading would enjoy this one.

I'll quote a bit from it: "Not just the mere fact of survival, which was of course remarkable in and of itself, but to have seen one world end and another begin. And not just to have seen the remembered splendours of the former world, the space shuttles and the electrical grid and the amplified guitars, the computers that could be held in the palm of a hand and the high-speed trains between cities, but to have lived among those wonders for so long."

I think this book did a remarkable job of expressing what a wondrous world we live in, and we don't even recognise how miraculous it is. It was a book that didn't have the usual focus on bad guys and good guys, blood and gore, but was rather a comparison between the world that was, and the lives that were lost and the connections that lived on. I gave it four out of five stars (but it's rare that I give any book 5 stars). It moved fast enough to keep my interest, which is rare these days, but it was a thoughtful book.

Somewhere, maybe in the book's blurb, or maybe it was on an Amazon review, someone wrote that the book was a "poem." I didn't get that out of the book - I didn't find the use of language particularly remarkable nor poetic in any sense for those who might fear flowery language. But it was still very well written. IMHO of course.

(And then, now, after finishing the book, I had the trouble of finding the post in which it had been mentioned but aha, I did!)
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Old 12-30-2014, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,295,382 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post

I just started Cinnamon and Gunpowder by Eli Brown which is way out of character for me. Here is the description:
"The year is 1819, and the renowned chef Owen Wedgwood has been kidnapped by the ruthless pirate Mad Hannah Mabbot. He will be spared, she tells him, as long as he puts exquisite food in front of her every Sunday without fail.
To appease the red-haired captain, Wedgwood gets cracking with the meager supplies on board. His first triumph at sea is actual bread, made from a sourdough starter that he leavens in a tin under his shirt throughout a roaring battle, as men are cutlassed all around him. Soon he’s making tea-smoked eel and brewing pineapple-banana cider.
But Mabbot—who exerts a curious draw on the chef—is under siege. Hunted by a deadly privateer and plagued by a saboteur hidden on her ship, she pushes her crew past exhaustion in her search for the notorious Brass Fox. As Wedgwood begins to sense a method to Mabbot’s madness, he must rely on the bizarre crewmembers he once feared: Mr. Apples, the fearsome giant who loves to knit; Feng and Bai, martial arts masters sworn to defend their captain; and Joshua, the deaf cabin boy who becomes the son Wedgwood never had."
That is not a usual genre for me either, Lisa. However, it sounds really good. I do love interesting characters. I think I'll give it a try. Sourdough starter in a tin under his shirt is what swayed me. LOL
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Old 12-30-2014, 02:36 PM
 
Location: North Central Illinois
7,356 posts, read 5,470,110 times
Reputation: 43414
I just got done reading 'The Dead Will Tell' by Linda Castillo. I am a big fan of this author and I read everything she puts out. Her books are always so suspenseful and page turners. It took me less than 24 hours to read this book. It was that good!
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Old 12-30-2014, 03:42 PM
 
4,038 posts, read 2,120,134 times
Reputation: 10970
Lisa, I read (should say skimmed) the imaginary friend book. I didn't think it was all that great.

I attempted to read "The Rosie Project." About a professor on the autism/Asperger's spectrum who wants to find a romantic partner, so of course he goes about in a scientific way, screening out people whom he "knows" it would never work out with...but he and a screened-out candidate, Rosie, fall in love. There's an even a sequel where they have a baby. And it's being made into a movie. Rosie is a free-spirit type to show that opposites do attract. Maybe it's because I spent much of my career working with people with autism/developmental disabilities, but I didn't find this guy all that interesting. People with autistic characteristics are just people...and some aren't that interesting. I've read that the book is much like the Big Bang Theory, which I don't watch. Maybe people who love that show would like this.

Just finished "Your Face in Mine" by Jess Row. I'd give it three out of five stars. I finished it, so that says something. The premise is fascinating. It sounds like science fiction, but it's not. Kelly runs into Martin, a high school friend who he hasn't seen for 20 years---and the friend, formerly Jewish/Caucasian is now African-American! Turns out he has had racial reassignment surgery. Martin hires Kelly to write a memoir about his transformation...and then it turns out that Martin has something else in mind. A subplot is that Kelly, also Caucasian, lived and worked in China and had a Chinese wife, so there is the issue of whether he was really meant to be Asian.

I don't think the racial identity thing was explored in enough depth. It supposedly is similar to a gender dysphoria, where someone feels they are in the wrong male or female body. Many of the motivations in the book seemed to be more commercial/entrepreneurial or just a preference, rather than a true psychological distress of being in the wrong body.

But it was interesting. I got through it---even though there were no quotation marks used, which drives me crazy...what's up with that?
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Old 12-31-2014, 06:40 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,921,934 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Buying and clicking frenzy? I've never experienced anything like that.

That book rings no bells but I just looked it up and it looks great! Well, it *did* look great until I clicked on the first three reviews, clicked on the reviewers "See all my reviews" link, and saw that this was the only book they had ever reviewed. Friends/family of the author. I hate that. Fewer stars on Goodreads, but still 3.65 out of 5 stars, so presumably no relation to Dr. Berk, but some strangers liked it a lot too. If they had it at my library, I'd read it. But they don't...

Finished Anatomy of a Kidnapping. If the 32 people who reviewed it on Amazon were friends and family, they must have been really good friends to have slogged through that one and still feel compelled to give it 4 or 5 stars. It should have been one of those true crime stories in Reader's Digest. That's all it was worth.
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Old 12-31-2014, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,987,281 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
Finished Anatomy of a Kidnapping. If the 32 people who reviewed it on Amazon were friends and family, they must have been really good friends to have slogged through that one and still feel compelled to give it 4 or 5 stars. It should have been one of those true crime stories in Reader's Digest. That's all it was worth.
UGH!!! And you finished it? You're his biggest fan now! Or, um, he's YOUR biggest fan now!

Everything I started since City of Thieves, as suspected, felt leaden. I think I started -- and stopped -- five books until I settled on a YA book that I'd had on my "to read" list for years and years: It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini. It was named one of the best-ever teen books of all time, and it's based on the true story of his five days in a psych ward as a teenager. A movie was also made of the book. He killed himself in December of last year.
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