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Old 01-18-2015, 09:18 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,698,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I didn't read anything today but I kind of watched a book.

I forgot all about that HBO series Olive Kitteridge until I happened across it online today. It's only four episodes of an hour each. Wow, it was good.

I'm not a TV watcher but this was... just wow. I sobbed like a baby at the end of the final episode. I don't remember the book, really, except that I loved it, but I don't think it was dark like the HBO series is. If all TV was like this, I'd be an addict and give up reading. Good thing that it's mostly crap. It's nice to find an exception, though.
Ooooh! I just watched the trailer and will look for it on Amazon Prime. I loved loved loved that book. And I remember it as dark and yet so amazingly lovely.

Finished The Good House by Ann Leary and really enjoyed it--especially the narrator, Hildy. Flawed but very human.

Started Family Life by Akhil Sharma. Nice writing, but sad. I'm about to read the end to see if things ever pick up. If they don't, I probably won't finish it.

OK, never mind. Things end on a better note, but I've lost interest. On to something else.

Last edited by Marlow; 01-18-2015 at 09:38 PM..
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Old 01-18-2015, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,013,815 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Ooooh! I just watched the trailer and will look for it on Amazon Prime. I loved loved loved that book. And I remember it as dark and yet so amazingly lovely.

Finished The Good House by Ann Leary and really enjoyed it--especially the narrator, Hildy. Flawed but very human.

Started Family Life by Akhil Sharma. Nice writing, but sad. I'm about to read the end to see if things ever pick up. If they don't, I probably won't finish it.
Olive Kitteridge: If you don't find it on Amazon Prime, let me know and I'll tell you where you can watch it. It was terrific.

The Good House: YES! I loved Hildy too. She reminded me of me, actually, except for the Realtor's license and drinking problem. And other things. But she still reminded me of me. Kind of. Gee, that didn't sound narcissistic at all.

Family Life: I read that. I just went back to find what I said about it. It was this: Family Life by Akhil Sharma was pretty good. It's narrated by a young boy -- who aged quickly at the end -- and it "sounds" just like a boy telling a story, albeit a boy who has some interesting insights into life. The end, though, was very rushed and ended abruptly.
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Old 01-18-2015, 09:44 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,698,048 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post

The Good House: YES! I loved Hildy too. She reminded me of me, actually, except for the Realtor's license and drinking problem. And other things. But she still reminded me of me. Kind of. Gee, that didn't sound narcissistic at all.

Family Life: I read that. I just went back to find what I said about it. It was this: Family Life by Akhil Sharma was pretty good. It's narrated by a young boy -- who aged quickly at the end -- and it "sounds" just like a boy telling a story, albeit a boy who has some interesting insights into life. The end, though, was very rushed and ended abruptly.
Since I haven't met you in person I can't say whether Hildy reminds me of you or not. But I like both of you in print!

Just decided to give up on Family Life. Read the end and just don't feel like making the journey to get there.
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Old 01-19-2015, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,380,896 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I gave up on What Alice Forgot after about 50 pages so I'm curious what you think about it. TBH, I can't even remember what I didn't like about it.
I enjoyed it well enough. It kept me wanting to now what did happen to Alice which was good. Since she forgot the past ten years of her life she got to see the good and bad of the last ten years from the more innocent perspective of being ten years younger, in her mind at least. Would you redo/change or fix things of you got to see where it all went wrong? Neat concept.

Anyway…the only thing I could think that you might not have liked was the jumping back and forth with the narration. It went between Alice, her sister, and their grandmother talking.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
Well today I had a chance to read- and got through about 1/4 way of A Man Called Ove.
I am really liking it- such an easy read. It kind of reminds me of Olive Kitteridge where there is humor but as I remember ( because I read Olive a while ago) there is a sadness at the same time.
In any case it's a very different and very readable book so thank you to the folks who suggested it- eventually I follow through and read.
I just picked that up from the library last week. I have a few to read before I get to it.

[quote=Lost Roses;38065151]Glad you liked it. I recommended it and nobody else liked it so I am pleased that you did.
I think I will like it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
A Man Called Ovewas compared to both The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry and Major Pettigrew's Last Stand. I really liked Major Pettigrew so placed a hold.

I downloaded Great Granny Websterby Caroline Blackwood, a book recommended here a year or so ago.
Thanks for that. I did know about The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry but not Major Pettigrew's Last Stand.



Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
Although I do admire the complexity of plotting here (the things people can think up!) I say: just sit down, eat a brownie, and stop killing people.

Ha, ha



Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
Anyone read Daniel Silva's books? Just wondering what you thought about them.

Sorry not yet.







I am now reading The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton. This is definitely an odd book for me but a recommended one. So far it is OK. Here is the description:

"Set in seventeenth century Amsterdam—a city ruled by glittering wealth and oppressive religion—a masterful debut steeped in atmosphere and shimmering with mystery, in the tradition of Emma Donoghue, Sarah Waters, and Sarah Dunant.

”There is nothing hidden that will not be revealed . . .“

On a brisk autumn day in 1686, eighteen-year-old Nella Oortman arrives in Amsterdam to begin a new life as the wife of illustrious merchant trader Johannes Brandt. But her new home, while splendorous, is not welcoming. Johannes is kind yet distant, always locked in his study or at his warehouse office—leaving Nella alone with his sister, the sharp-tongued and forbidding Marin.

But Nella’s world changes when Johannes presents her with an extraordinary wedding gift: a cabinet-sized replica of their home. To furnish her gift, Nella engages the services of a miniaturist—an elusive and enigmatic artist whose tiny creations mirror their real-life counterparts in eerie and unexpected ways . . .

Johannes’ gift helps Nella to pierce the closed world of the Brandt household. But as she uncovers its unusual secrets, she begins to understand—and fear—the escalating dangers that await them all. In this repressively pious society where gold is worshipped second only to God, to be different is a threat to the moral fabric of society, and not even a man as rich as Johannes is safe. Only one person seems to see the fate that awaits them. Is the miniaturist the key to their salvation . . . or the architect of their destruction?

Enchanting, beautiful, and exquisitely suspenseful, The Miniaturist is a magnificent story of love and obsession, betrayal and retribution, appearance and truth."







BTW here us a book I came across this morning that some of you may like.

When Books Went to War: The Stories that Helped Us Win World War II by Molly Guptill Manning.

"When America entered World War II in 1941, we faced an enemy that had banned and burned over 100 million books and caused fearful citizens to hide or destroy many more. Outraged librarians launched a campaign to send free books to American troops and gathered 20 million hardcover donations. In 1943, the War Department and the publishing industry stepped in with an extraordinary program: 120 million small, lightweight paperbacks, for troops to carry in their pockets and their rucksacks, in every theater of war.

Comprising 1,200 different titles of every imaginable type, these paperbacks were beloved by the troops and are still fondly remembered today. Soldiers read them while waiting to land at Normandy; in hellish trenches in the midst of battles in the Pacific; in field hospitals; and on long bombing flights. They wrote to the authors, many of whom responded to every letter. They helped rescue The Great Gatsby from obscurity. They made Betty Smith, author of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, into a national icon. When Books Went to War is an inspiring story for history buffs and book lovers alike."
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Old 01-19-2015, 08:39 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,842,780 times
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Originally Posted by younglisa7
Quote:
When Books Went to War: The Stories that Helped Us Win World War II by Molly Guptill Manning.
OMG Lisa that sounds so good,especially since getting on a WW2 history kick after reading
The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion by Fannie Flagg. You know I had to put that on my 'must read soon list,lol!

I almost never have read two books at the same time,however after starting the historical fiction set around the great Chicago Fire~ 'Into The Whirlwind'by Elizabeth Camden... One of my reserves-Velva Jean Learns To Drive,came into the library- which is first in a trilogy in which the protagonist will become one of the young women who flew planes during WW2.

I'm on page 58 of 404 of Velva Jean Learns to Drive : Starts out with this 10 year old mountain girl being very worried about not being 'saved' by Jesus,because her daddy told her if she dies,she's going to hell,and her older brother confirms that it's probably true that both him and her are probably going to hell! I am interested in reading about the changes that the building of the scenic Blue Ridge Parkway brought to the Appalachians.

This 'saved' chapter is hilarious,haha!
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Old 01-19-2015, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,252,061 times
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Younglisa, thanks for recommending When Books Went To War.i thought I had downloaded, but did not. It looks interesting.
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Old 01-19-2015, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Tonawanda NY
400 posts, read 575,364 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post


Next up…A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini.
I finished this a few weeks ago, hard to put down, great book with some unexpected twist. Left me wanting to learn more about the Afghan culture prior to their war years.
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Old 01-19-2015, 12:49 PM
 
4,723 posts, read 4,413,722 times
Reputation: 8481
Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
Anyone read Daniel Silva's books? Just wondering what you thought about them.
Yes- I have read a few and really liked them. I don't usually read that genre, I guess spy=Ludlum esque, but someone recommended Silva when I said I needed a real page turner. I enjoyed it and read a few more. I cannot remember which ones I have read though I think the Confessor and maybe a few around that time. I know lots of people like his books.
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Old 01-19-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,091 posts, read 15,427,067 times
Reputation: 15038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I remember a discussion about the book Wolf Hall here and I just discovered that PBS is presenting the show on Masterpiece Theater. There was no date listed. Oliver Cromwell is one of my least favorite historic characters but I have the feeling that PBS will present a delish show because the court of Henry VIII was full of all kinds of scathing intrigue. I like that as long as it is not in my personal life.
Wolf Hall on PBS
April 5
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Old 01-19-2015, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Windham County, VT
10,855 posts, read 6,366,573 times
Reputation: 22048
I'm re-reading some favorite anthologies I own, collected works of Edward Gorey:
Amphigorey, Amphigorey Too, Amphigorey Also, and (posthumously) Amphigorey Again.

I just love love love his ornate drawings & absurd moody writing.
Edward Gorey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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