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Old 03-30-2015, 07:28 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,842,780 times
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I'm reading a nonfiction right now~The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God by Carl Sagan and finding it very interesting.
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Old 03-30-2015, 08:12 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,698,048 times
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I'm about 30 pages in to Stern Men and so far, so good. I had no idea what to expect, but at least so far love the setting and am getting to know the characters.
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Old 03-30-2015, 02:12 PM
 
17 posts, read 33,562 times
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I am reading the book American Sniper.
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Old 03-30-2015, 02:19 PM
 
1,150 posts, read 1,106,645 times
Reputation: 1112
Just bought and reading Farmageddon by Philip Lymbery, puts you off cheap meat.
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Old 03-31-2015, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
23,656 posts, read 13,964,967 times
Reputation: 18855
"Raquel: Beyond the Cleavage" by Raquel Welch
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Old 03-31-2015, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,928,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I finished The Signature of All Things. I definitely didn't love it as much as Ketabcha did. It was too drawn out for me. The botany parts were fine but the philosophical aspect of it bored me, as did the whole part in Tahiti. While I loved and connected so completely with the characters in Stern Men, I didn't in this book. (Well, I did love and connect with Roger, the dog. Woof!) Maybe part of that is because it takes place such a long time ago. I don't know.

I obviously liked it enough to read it all -- although I will admit to skimming bits in the last third of the book -- but it didn't wow me.
I also found that tiresome, a distraction in what was otherwise a very, very good book. Most perplexing to me was, that when she raised her Big Question, the answer to it leapt into my mind immediately, and it seemed to me to be perfectly transparent.

I have found recently that I am often skipping over pages of philosophical meanderings. in a lot of books. Especially deadly are the parts where it is a dialog between two people philosophizing. I tried to read Howard Jacobsen's "The Finkler Question", and started skipping ahead, and came to the conclusion that the whole book was nothing but philosophizing conversations which never ended until I threw it back with disgust into the book return bin outside the library.

That started to be a real downer in Knausgaard's "My Struggle", too.

Meanwhile, I am really enjoying Louise Erdrich's "Master Butcher". There are parts that are brilliant, but again, as I said earlier, I often have problems relating to her characters, and it takes a bit of plodding to wade through it.

Last edited by jtur88; 03-31-2015 at 06:16 AM..
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Old 03-31-2015, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,013,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I also found that tiresome, a distraction in what was otherwise a very, very good book. Most perplexing to me was, that when she raised her Big Question, the answer to it leapt into my mind immediately, and it seemed to me to be perfectly transparent.

I have found recently that I am often skipping over pages of philosophical meanderings. in a lot of books. Especially deadly are the parts where it is a dialog between two people philosophizing. I tried to read Howard Jacobsen's "The Finkler Question", and started skipping ahead, and came to the conclusion that the whole book was nothing but philosophizing conversations which never ended until I threw it back with disgust into the book return bin outside the library.

That started to be a real downer in Knausgaard's "My Struggle", too.

Meanwhile, I am really enjoying Louise Erdrich's "Master Butcher". There are parts that are brilliant, but again, as I said earlier, I often have problems relating to her characters, and it takes a bit of plodding to wade through it.
Oh my gosh, The Finkler Question! I tried to read that when it came out, thinking that it would be fabulous. A chapter or so in, I had that "what the hell???" moment and realized that this book was NOT for me and NOT fabulous.

I can't remember what book I recently tried to read that had exactly what you're talking about: philosophizing in dialogue. I wanted to rip my hair out. Who talks like that? And if people *do* talk like that, I don't want to read it. Shoot, I wish that I could remember the name of the book. It was right before I moved, so sometime in January or February. It'll come to me. (Or it won't.)

As for The Signature of All Things, it was so different from her previous book that I'd just finished, Stern Men, and that threw me too, possibly because the latter was set in contemporary times with contemporary characters that I could relate to. And nobody went to Tahiti and philosophized.
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:15 AM
 
496 posts, read 395,293 times
Reputation: 1090
I'm reading Olive Kitteridge ATM. I forget who recommended it but I am finding it a bit strange. I keep finding my mind wandering because the story seems so disjointed. I'm not sure I am going to like it but I am plodding on and I hope that it all ties together wonderfully at the end.
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Old 03-31-2015, 09:51 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,698,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Holly-Kay View Post
I'm reading Olive Kitteridge ATM. I forget who recommended it but I am finding it a bit strange. I keep finding my mind wandering because the story seems so disjointed. I'm not sure I am going to like it but I am plodding on and I hope that it all ties together wonderfully at the end.
It's really a collection of short stories that are tied together by Olive, who appears in all of them. Sometimes she's the main character and sometimes she's barely mentioned. Other characters appear in several of the stories as well. It's one of my favorite books because of the complexity of the characters, but, as always, it may not be for everyone.

Another Strout book that I loved is Amy and Isabelle. It's a straightforward novel. What I always remember about that book is that I was reading it in the waiting room at the vet's office and it made my cry. It's a mother/daughter story and they always get me.
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Old 03-31-2015, 10:36 AM
 
2,418 posts, read 2,034,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
It's really a collection of short stories that are tied together by Olive, who appears in all of them. Sometimes she's the main character and sometimes she's barely mentioned. Other characters appear in several of the stories as well. It's one of my favorite books because of the complexity of the characters, but, as always, it may not be for everyone.

Another Strout book that I loved is Amy and Isabelle. It's a straightforward novel. What I always remember about that book is that I was reading it in the waiting room at the vet's office and it made my cry. It's a mother/daughter story and they always get me.

I will look for 'Amy and Isabelle', sounds good. I'm new to this thread & came to it to get ideas of books to send my mom. She needs large print & I just recently sent her 'Wild' by Cheryl Strayed; and 'The Greatest Generation' by Tom Brokaw. She tends to favor nonfiction or historical novels & I'm sure I will find some great suggestions in this thread, (I have some catching up to do, wow!)

I just finished reading 'The Art of Racing in the Rain' by Garth Stein - read it twice I loved it so much. It made me realize how much I miss reading & how I want to make time for that again. My bookshelf is full of books that I bought before life came along and interrupted me!
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