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Old 05-14-2015, 06:04 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,844,099 times
Reputation: 5201

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Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
You have a long way to go which is a good thing when you find something good to read Is Julia "growing"?
Haha,I sure do,but I read a Julia book then something else,then another Julia book.Little Lloyd is the one who is growing.I love him,Julia, and Lillian.





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Old 05-14-2015, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
Haha,I sure do,but I read a Julia book then something else,then another Julia book.Little Lloyd is the one who is growing.I love him,Julia, and Lillian.





I may have to try those again
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Started "History of the Kelly Gang". Now, I love Peter Carey. But after two pages, ,I glanced at the middle of the book, and it keeps right on with "He give it to her right where she were standing down there with the other 2 people." This is not a quote, it is the style of every line of 350 pages of narrative.. Nope. No story is good enough for a reader to endure that kind of literary abuse. It's like reading a book in a foreign language that you can't think in, you have to translate every sentence into a language you comprehend. I never got very far in "Huckleberry Finn", either.
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Old 05-14-2015, 12:07 PM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
I'm on page 64 of Deep Down Dark by Hector Tobar and it's good. If you like Jon Krakauer or Sebastian Junger adventure/disaster books, you'll probably like this. I have two minor complaints: It's written in the present tense, which is a little annoying. I think the author is probably trying to give the reader a feeling of urgency and also being down in the mine with the miners, but I find it distracting. The other thing is that I'll never keep the miners all straight and I wish I could. There are 33 of them, all men, and mostly with Hispanic given names and surnames. The book is all about the minere, but it's hard to keep up with their individual stories and roles. But I can't imagine how the author could have done it differently.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:31 PM
 
Location: "Arlen" Texas
12,192 posts, read 2,961,959 times
Reputation: 14503
I'm trying to decide.
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
I'm ridiculous. Once again, I didn't choose one of the hundreds of books that I already have on my Kindle. No. I didn't walk the two blocks to the library. No. Both of those things would be silly. Instead, I bought a new book from the comfort of my couch.

I haven't started it yet, but I bought Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani. It's a first novel, it was just released on May 1, 2015, but it has almost 900 reviews (most of them great), and a bunch of other good ones on Goodreads. It made me think that Sejal has a lot of friends and acquaintances who are acting as shills, but I clicked on a bunch of reviewer names and saw that they'd reviewed other books. Most shills have one review on their record -- that book that you're looking at.

Anyway, we'll see how it goes. It was only $4.99 so it's not a big loss if the book is a bust.
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:39 PM
 
179 posts, read 149,584 times
Reputation: 545
The Girl on the Train, I think it is overrated. The last three or four chapters were okay. I don't get the hype.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
I'm reading The Affinities by Robert Charles Wilson. It was one of those books I thought I couldn't live without before it was released, and then when the release date finally came, the impetus to read it immediately just fizzled out. But I am about halfway through. So far it hasn't blown me away but it isn't bad either. I've been reading just a few pages here and there in between my work so perhaps part of the problem is that I haven't ever had the time to absorb myself in it.

There's a book coming up towards the end of this month that I can't live without - I can't remember just what it is right now but it's on my wish list. Hopefully when the release date comes, I will still want to read it as much as I do right now.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:46 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,844,099 times
Reputation: 5201
Nothing Like It in the World:The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad, 1863-1869
by Stephen E. Ambrose

Nothing Like It in the World is the story of the men who built the transcontinental railroad -- the investors who risked their businesses and money; the enlightened politicians who understood its importance; the engineers and surveyors who risked, and lost, their lives; and the Irish and Chinese immigrants, the defeated Confederate soldiers, and the other laborers who did the backbreaking and dangerous work on the tracks.
The Union had won the Civil War and slavery had been abolished, but Abraham Lincoln, who was an early and constant champion of railroads, would not live to see the great achievement. In Ambrose's hands, this enterprise, with its huge expenditure of brainpower, muscle, and sweat, comes to life.
The U.S. government pitted two companies -- the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroads -- against each other in a race for funding, encouraging speed over caution. Locomo-tives, rails, and spikes were shipped from the East through Panama or around South America to the West or lugged across the country to the Plains. This was the last great building project to be done mostly by hand: excavating dirt, cutting through ridges, filling gorges, blasting tunnels through mountains.
At its peak, the workforce -- primarily Chinese on the Central Pacific, Irish on the Union Pacific -- approached the size of Civil War armies, with as many as fifteen thousand workers on each line. The Union Pacific was led by Thomas "Doc" Durant, Oakes Ames, and Oliver Ames, with Grenville Dodge -- America's greatest railroad builder -- as chief engineer. The Central Pacific was led by California's "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis Huntington, Charles Crocker, and Mark Hopkins. The surveyors, the men who picked the route, were latter-day Lewis and Clark types who led the way through the wilderness, living off buffalo, deer, elk, and antelope.
In building a railroad, there is only one decisive spot -- the end of the track. Nothing like this great work had been seen in the world when the last spike, a golden one, was driven in at Promontory Summit, Utah, in 1869, as the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific tracks were joined.
Ambrose writes with power and eloquence about the brave men -- the famous and the unheralded, ordinary men doing the extraordinary -- who accomplished the spectacular feat that made the continent into a nation.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:51 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,349,261 times
Reputation: 1795
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I'm ridiculous. Once again, I didn't choose one of the hundreds of books that I already have on my Kindle. No. I didn't walk the two blocks to the library. No. Both of those things would be silly. Instead, I bought a new book from the comfort of my couch.

I haven't started it yet, but I bought Trail of Broken Wings by Sejal Badani. It's a first novel, it was just released on May 1, 2015, but it has almost 900 reviews (most of them great), and a bunch of other good ones on Goodreads. It made me think that Sejal has a lot of friends and acquaintances who are acting as shills, but I clicked on a bunch of reviewer names and saw that they'd reviewed other books. Most shills have one review on their record -- that book that you're looking at.

Anyway, we'll see how it goes. It was only $4.99 so it's not a big loss if the book is a bust.

I'm pretty sure that was a Kindle First selection for May. I think when I read the description of it I thought nah, I'm not in the mood - not like I was going to start reading it that day anyway so I don't know why that mattered. Now re-reading the description of it I'm kicking myself for not having gotten it.
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