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Old 05-16-2015, 04:32 AM
 
1 posts, read 777 times
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I've thoroughly enjoyed reading several books set in the UK around 1900 which covered how everyday life affected folks from different backgrounds. Would thoroughly recommend the following to anyone with similar interests:-
Brother to the Ox by Fred Kitchen - a biography of a farm labourer in the early 20th century and how at that time farm labours were 'hired' for a year at the local Statutes Fairs. A very good coverage of life on the land around this time in rural England.
The Belle Fields by Lora Adams - a very good read - although a romantic fiction - the book describes brilliantly local customs and celebrations in the early 20th century in the UK 'Big houses' eg Downton Abbey. The story traces the turmoil which follows a local village girl who goes to work in the kichen at the local mansion. Many twists and turns for her and quite an unexpected (I thought sad) end to the story so beware!
Lifting the Latch by Sheila Stewart - a story which follows the life of a shepherd in Oxfordshire UK again at the turn of the 19th century. 'Old Mont' who is a real character in his own right spends many hours recounting his long and colourful life to Sheila who makes a lovely job of getting it all down for the reader!
Hope anyone who wants to have a good read enjoys these as much as I have?
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:13 AM
 
364 posts, read 277,433 times
Reputation: 123
I am reading and thoroughly enjoying: Wolf,The lives of Jack London.
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:58 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
Reputation: 8481
Quote:
Originally Posted by briandlin View Post
I've thoroughly enjoyed reading several books set in the UK around 1900 which covered how everyday life affected folks from different backgrounds. Would thoroughly recommend the following to anyone with similar interests:-
Brother to the Ox by Fred Kitchen - a biography of a farm labourer in the early 20th century and how at that time farm labours were 'hired' for a year at the local Statutes Fairs. A very good coverage of life on the land around this time in rural England.
The Belle Fields by Lora Adams - a very good read - although a romantic fiction - the book describes brilliantly local customs and celebrations in the early 20th century in the UK 'Big houses' eg Downton Abbey. The story traces the turmoil which follows a local village girl who goes to work in the kichen at the local mansion. Many twists and turns for her and quite an unexpected (I thought sad) end to the story so beware!
Lifting the Latch by Sheila Stewart - a story which follows the life of a shepherd in Oxfordshire UK again at the turn of the 19th century. 'Old Mont' who is a real character in his own right spends many hours recounting his long and colourful life to Sheila who makes a lovely job of getting it all down for the reader!
Hope anyone who wants to have a good read enjoys these as much as I have?

These look wonderful. Thank you for suggesting them.
Now a question- does anyone have a good way to remember these? I used to just make a written list, then I graduated to copy paste via excel. I guess I should just resume that but wondering with all the suggestions here, so many fall through the cracks.
Adding now, that I have looked at my local library online, and then on amazon- that I wonder how you stumbled on these books- one was just published, but the other was from 1984 and neither has any reviews. They do sound lovely but I don't think I will be able to get them ( I do not buy books
Now I can update that I just finished Butterflies in November. I might have been distracted while I read it, so I would say I agree that it is beautifully written but to be totally frank, I think I really got lost in what was happening when.
A very interesting book, but not on my list of the best.

Last edited by Mayvenne; 05-16-2015 at 09:02 AM.. Reason: cannot find these books in real life except for amazon
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Old 05-16-2015, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
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I'm slightly more than 20% through Trail of Broken Wings and I really wish that it would end already. I don't know if I'm a harsh critic or if all of those reviewers were on mind-altering drugs when they read the book, but our opinions are not meshing. While scanning the reviews before I started reading the book, I saw that a few people talked about a twist in the story. That's the only thing that's keeping me going. It's so over-written -- overly over-written. The characters seem to be saying the same thing over and over (and over and over) again but I'm trying to hang in there until twist-time. It doesn't bode well that I keep fall asleep while reading.
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Old 05-16-2015, 04:39 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
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We're on the last day of our vacation and it's probably telling that I am sitting here on the laptop instead of reading my book: Harlan Coben's "Missing You." It was a blind pick up from our library's "Choice Reads" section, and frankly I've only made it to page 95 -- while on vacation with LOTS of time, and I've probably set it down 95 times.

While driving the long hours from Seattle Metro to NE Oregon, and part way back again, we've been listening to Douglas Preston and Lincoln Childs' "Cabinets of Curiosities." It's been a good read, but it's a story set post "Thunderhead" and there are numerous references back from two shared characters and it drives me mad when I don't understand the inferences. Since their books are not written with sequels per se -- it's just that they re-use characters they like, pairing some from different series so they really should write out a road map!

Anyway, that's what I've been reading.
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Old 05-16-2015, 04:40 PM
 
Location: ATL
15 posts, read 47,509 times
Reputation: 14
I just finished Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty. It was a really fun vacation read, the first real humorous mystery/thriller I've read. I'm looking forward to grabbing a couple of her other works.
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Old 05-16-2015, 05:39 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,075,496 times
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Well picked up "The Boston Girl " by Anita Diamant who also wrote the red tent . Let me tell you all I am half way through this book already it is that good . I am loving it . Maybe some of the rest of you will too .
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:28 PM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,844,099 times
Reputation: 5201
Quote:
Originally Posted by MayvenneNow a question- does anyone have a good way to remember these? I used to just make a written list, then I graduated to copy paste via excel. I guess I should just resume that but wondering with all the suggestions here, so many fall through the cracks.
Adding now, that I have looked at my local library online, and then on amazon- that I wonder how you stumbled on these books- one was just published, but the other was from 1984 and neither has any reviews. They do sound lovely but I don't think I will be able to get them ( I do not buy books)
I mostly borrow books from the library or get Kindle 'Freebies'.The way that I save my TBR lists is to use a blank email for each genre,and paste the titles in them and save them in my email 'Drafts' folder.

Did you know that if your library participates in Inter-Library- Loans... you can borrow about any book ever published? If my library system doesn't have a book I just go to Amazon and get the info and write it down on a page from a little spiral notebook and take it up to the information desk at my library and they fill out an ILL form to request the book.

For instance this would be the info I would have written down for those books mentioned~
Brother to the Ox Hardcover – Large Print by Fred Kitchen
Hardcover: 256 pages
Publisher: Chivers Press; Large type edition edition (January 11, 1984)

ISBN-10: 0851192513
ISBN-13: 978-0851192512

The Belle Fields by Lora Adams

Paperback: 342 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 27, 2015)

ISBN-10: 1511866810
ISBN-13: 978-1511866811


T he last book~Lifting the Latch: A Life on the Land - Based on the Life of Mont Abbott of Enstone, Oxfordshire by Sheila Stewart can be purchased for $.60-$.98, so I would just buy it used, for less than $5 with shipping,or write down the same info to request it through ILL,but my library only allows me to request 2 ILL books at a time.
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Old 05-17-2015, 04:53 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
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Thank you autumn--- I do use the library exclusively. Online ours even has a feature for suggested purchases and I do use that, and they have always purchased my requests . The library does participate in the inter library loans........ but I guess the feature is not online (or apparent to me). In any case thank you so much for explaining and suggesting. I like the email idea because my excel file is not always accessible but the email sure is
.
I did this with a scanned copy of my passport (so I could access it from any where if needed) but never thought about it for this purpose.
Great idea- thank you again
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Old 05-17-2015, 05:06 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,844,099 times
Reputation: 5201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
Thank you autumn--- I do use the library exclusively. Online ours even has a feature for suggested purchases and I do use that, and they have always purchased my requests . The library does participate in the inter library loans........ but I guess the feature is not online (or apparent to me). In any case thank you so much for explaining and suggesting. I like the email idea because my excel file is not always accessible but the email sure is
.
I did this with a scanned copy of my passport (so I could access it from any where if needed) but never thought about it for this purpose.
Great idea- thank you again

You are very welcome,glad I could help. BTW, I can't request books through my library ILL myself,either.That is why I have to write the info down.I then give it to a librarian working at the info desk,and they do it.The form asks how much you would be willing to pay if there is a charge and I say $3,but there has never yet been a charge,even for books in libraries as far away from Ohio as,Utah and Wyoming.
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