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Old 05-26-2015, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,727 posts, read 9,866,849 times
Reputation: 20480

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I finished THE OUTSIDER that I got for a buck at the Dollar Tree. It was okay but it needed some firm editing. Gave it to my son.

Of course, my last trip to the Dollar Tree ended up with buying candy for the two tiny dancers after their recital so I paid and was almost out the door when I realized I had passed the book bin! What was I thinking!?

The pickings were slim but I did pick up In the Kingdom of Men by Kim Barnes Only 17 pages in (I had to cut the grass before it rains). Anyone have any input?

I just finished The Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene. Bette has finally confessed that she is Patty and the story is hers. What a sad childhood she had.
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Old 05-26-2015, 04:56 PM
 
43,195 posts, read 43,818,360 times
Reputation: 20332
Just started reading "The Winner" by David Baldacci.
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Old 05-26-2015, 06:26 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,471,072 times
Reputation: 14764
Hi, all. I took back the Chris Fowler's "Full Dark House" today, I made it 30%. I just couldn't muster up enough interest in the story to keep going. Basically, nothing was happening, it was like watching moss grow on a sunny wall. I've got a couple checked out from the library, but DH recommended the one he just finished, so I think I will try it. "Broken English" by P.L. Gaus. If that doesn't work out, I'll move on to "And Sometimes I Wonder About You" by Walter Mosley. I love his writing, but I've never read his mysteries.

Really I am not in a reading frame of mind. In fact, I am not motivated to do much of anything. Ho hum.
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Old 05-26-2015, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,727 posts, read 9,866,849 times
Reputation: 20480
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Hi, all. I took back the Chris Fowler's "Full Dark House" today, I made it 30%. I just couldn't muster up enough interest in the story to keep going. Basically, nothing was happening, it was like watching moss grow on a sunny wall. I've got a couple checked out from the library, but DH recommended the one he just finished, so I think I will try it. "Broken English" by P.L. Gaus. If that doesn't work out, I'll move on to "And Sometimes I Wonder About You" by Walter Mosley. I love his writing, but I've never read his mysteries.

Really I am not in a reading frame of mind. In fact, I am not motivated to do much of anything. Ho hum.
LOL!! Not too sure about the intent of the book title, but there is an old story about two people talking and one says, "I fear everyone is crazy except for thee and me. And sometimes, I'm not to sure about thee."
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 32,795,277 times
Reputation: 28897
Okay, so you know that I'm reading The Nobodies Album, which has a bit of a mystery in it. Well, I've never really read mysteries. The few times that I've tried, I got lost in them -- I couldn't keep track of what I was supposed to keep track of, which was frustrating. Anyway, those of you who have read mysteries: Do you ever find that you're wondering why X question was asked? I'm reading this and I'm wondering why nobody's asked who called the police. I'm baffled. If this was a mistake by the author, I'm going to be angry. If I forgot that it was already asked, then I'm going to be even angrier (although, without going back 50 or more pages, I'll never know that it was my own fault). And if someone asks the question in the next 10 or 20 pages, then this entire post will have been for naught.

/end of my ridiculousness (for now)
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Old 05-27-2015, 01:19 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,780,240 times
Reputation: 5201
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn
Was disappointed in Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford, found it boring and not engaging,and having the same problem with~The Dancing Floor by Barbara Michaels.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily
Agree. Another one I'm sorry I finished.

Glad to see that I'm not the only one who was not impressed by this book at all. zzzzzzzzz!
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Old 05-27-2015, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,549 posts, read 30,226,529 times
Reputation: 88940
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
Glad to see that I'm not the only one who was not impressed by this book at all. zzzzzzzzz!

We win some and lose some




I am on vacation and for the drive Iistened to the beginning of Wesley the Owl: The Remarkable Love Story of an Owl and His Girl:
"On Valentine's Day 1985, biologist Stacey O'Brien met a four-day-old baby barn owl—a fateful encounter that would turn into an astonishing nineteen-year saga. With nerve damage in one wing, the owlet's ability to fly was forever compromised, and he had no hope of surviving on his own in the wild. O'Brien, a young assistant in the owl laboratory at Caltech, was immediately smitten, promising to care for the helpless owlet and give him a permanent home. Wesley the Owl is the funny, poignant story of their dramatic two decades together.

With both a tender heart and a scientist's eye, O'Brien studied Wesley's strange habits intensively—and provided a mice-only diet that required her to buy the rodents in bulk (28,000 over the owl's lifetime). As Wesley grew, O'Brien snapped photos of him at every stage like any proud parent, recording his life from a helpless ball of fuzz to a playful, clumsy adolescent to a gorgeous, gold-and-white, macho adult owl with a heart-shaped face and an outsize personality that belied his eighteen-inch stature. Stacey and Wesley's bond deepened as she discovered Wesley's individual personality, subtle emotions, and playful nature that could also turn fiercely loyal and protective—though she could have done without Wesley's driving away her would-be human suitors!

O'Brien also brings us inside the prestigious research community, where resident owls sometimes flew freely from office to office and eccentric, brilliant scientists were extraordinarily committed to studying and helping animals; all of them were changed by the animal they loved. As O'Brien gets close to Wesley, she makes important discoveries about owl behavior, intelligence, and communication, coining the term "The Way of the Owl" to describe his inclinations: he did not tolerate lies, held her to her promises, and provided unconditional love, though he was not beyond an occasional sulk. When O'Brien develops her own life-threatening illness, the biologist who saved the life of a helpless baby bird is herself rescued from death by the insistent love and courage of this wild animal."



I am enjoying the story and learning a lot about barn owls.

He was so cute as a baby…looks like a toy.
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:09 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,560,165 times
Reputation: 26859
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
We win some and lose some




I am on vacation and for the drive Iistened to the beginning of Wesley the Owl: The Remarkable Love Story of an Owl and His Girl:
"On Valentine's Day 1985, biologist Stacey O'Brien met a four-day-old baby barn owl—a fateful encounter that would turn into an astonishing nineteen-year saga. With nerve damage in one wing, the owlet's ability to fly was forever compromised, and he had no hope of surviving on his own in the wild. O'Brien, a young assistant in the owl laboratory at Caltech, was immediately smitten, promising to care for the helpless owlet and give him a permanent home. Wesley the Owl is the funny, poignant story of their dramatic two decades together.

With both a tender heart and a scientist's eye, O'Brien studied Wesley's strange habits intensively—and provided a mice-only diet that required her to buy the rodents in bulk (28,000 over the owl's lifetime). As Wesley grew, O'Brien snapped photos of him at every stage like any proud parent, recording his life from a helpless ball of fuzz to a playful, clumsy adolescent to a gorgeous, gold-and-white, macho adult owl with a heart-shaped face and an outsize personality that belied his eighteen-inch stature. Stacey and Wesley's bond deepened as she discovered Wesley's individual personality, subtle emotions, and playful nature that could also turn fiercely loyal and protective—though she could have done without Wesley's driving away her would-be human suitors!

O'Brien also brings us inside the prestigious research community, where resident owls sometimes flew freely from office to office and eccentric, brilliant scientists were extraordinarily committed to studying and helping animals; all of them were changed by the animal they loved. As O'Brien gets close to Wesley, she makes important discoveries about owl behavior, intelligence, and communication, coining the term "The Way of the Owl" to describe his inclinations: he did not tolerate lies, held her to her promises, and provided unconditional love, though he was not beyond an occasional sulk. When O'Brien develops her own life-threatening illness, the biologist who saved the life of a helpless baby bird is herself rescued from death by the insistent love and courage of this wild animal."



I am enjoying the story and learning a lot about barn owls.

He was so cute as a baby…looks like a toy.
That sounds good and is going on my list. Thanks!

I can't tell if you're joking or not, but are you sure that's not a toy? Those feet look like pink plush material.
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:13 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,560,165 times
Reputation: 26859
At the library I picked up a copy of The Boys From Brazil by Ira Levin. It was published in 1976 but I never read it and for some reason it was on the new release table.

If you're not familiar with it, it's a thriller about former Nazi's trying to bring about a Fourth Reich and the Nazi hunter who is trying to stop them. I think there's a sci-fi element to it, but I'm not sure yet. It also was a movie with Gregory Peck but I never saw that either.
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:26 AM
 
2,418 posts, read 2,007,494 times
Reputation: 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
We win some and lose some




I am on vacation and for the drive Iistened to the beginning of Wesley the Owl: The Remarkable Love Story of an Owl and His Girl:
"On Valentine's Day 1985, biologist Stacey O'Brien met a four-day-old baby barn owl—a fateful encounter that would turn into an astonishing nineteen-year saga. With nerve damage in one wing, the owlet's ability to fly was forever compromised, and he had no hope of surviving on his own in the wild. O'Brien, a young assistant in the owl laboratory at Caltech, was immediately smitten, promising to care for the helpless owlet and give him a permanent home. Wesley the Owl is the funny, poignant story of their dramatic two decades together.

With both a tender heart and a scientist's eye, O'Brien studied Wesley's strange habits intensively—and provided a mice-only diet that required her to buy the rodents in bulk (28,000 over the owl's lifetime). As Wesley grew, O'Brien snapped photos of him at every stage like any proud parent, recording his life from a helpless ball of fuzz to a playful, clumsy adolescent to a gorgeous, gold-and-white, macho adult owl with a heart-shaped face and an outsize personality that belied his eighteen-inch stature. Stacey and Wesley's bond deepened as she discovered Wesley's individual personality, subtle emotions, and playful nature that could also turn fiercely loyal and protective—though she could have done without Wesley's driving away her would-be human suitors!

O'Brien also brings us inside the prestigious research community, where resident owls sometimes flew freely from office to office and eccentric, brilliant scientists were extraordinarily committed to studying and helping animals; all of them were changed by the animal they loved. As O'Brien gets close to Wesley, she makes important discoveries about owl behavior, intelligence, and communication, coining the term "The Way of the Owl" to describe his inclinations: he did not tolerate lies, held her to her promises, and provided unconditional love, though he was not beyond an occasional sulk. When O'Brien develops her own life-threatening illness, the biologist who saved the life of a helpless baby bird is herself rescued from death by the insistent love and courage of this wild animal."



I am enjoying the story and learning a lot about barn owls.

He was so cute as a baby…looks like a toy.

Lisa, that sounds like a great story. But that baby owl pic....I think you're having some fun with us! Btw, I would have expected this from Dawn!
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