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Old 08-16-2015, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,321,218 times
Reputation: 9858

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I finished Watch How We Walk by Jennifer Lovegrove yesterday Watch How We Walk: Jennifer LoveGrove: 9781770411272: Amazon.com: Books

It is the story of two young girls growing up as Jehovah's Witnesses. In many ways it is what Miriam Toews' last book should have been. It gives a look at a dysfunctional JW family and the thoughts that go on in the mind of children raised in really any kind of deep faith when it is coupled with a hidden family trauma. I dislike apostate fiction or non-fiction that takes the easy way out in bashing a faith when to the outside reader it is clear that it is the dynamics of the family within that expresses itself as something extreme in faith. The writer grew up as a JW - the book felt so true that I looked her up to be sure.

Jazzcat, I think it was you who mentioned Miriam Toews' book and was disappointed in it because it didn't really have anything in it about Mennonites? I was thinking that maybe this book might interest you.

But I will say one thing - I hated the ending. It felt like a cop-out ending to me and a more ambiguous ending would have felt truer. I gave it four stars and in spite of the ending I would recommend it. But if unhappy endings bother you, then this is not the book for you.

Here is a review from a paper:
Book Review: Watch How We Walk, by Jennifer LoveGrove | National Post And here is an interview with the writer which is very worth reading: http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/bo...es-and-writing


I am around the 70% mark in The Lives of the Caesars. And after reading Watch How We Walk I began reading The Fifth Wave. I am in need of a little unreality after Watch How We Walk. Now the strange thing about The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey is that the Kindle edition skips page numbers by fives - for example, going from page 1 to page 6, and the location numbers do the same thing, but there is no actual jump in the text. Pretty weird. Annoying. I'm trying not to look and become obsessive about those jumping numbers as the book might be good. And if I like The Fifth Wave, then I am all set up because there is a sequel to it and that takes a whole lot of stress off my mind right there in knowing I will have something to read next.

And I also read one night when I could not settle on anything serious, an autobiography by Shirley Jones, mother of Shaun Cassidy, my teenaged heartthrob. Definitely skip this one. Shirley Jones has nothing interesting to say.

And before that I read The Hercules Text by Jack McDevitt. Science fiction fans will recognise McDevitt's name. I gave it 4 stars but since I've read a few books since then, I've forgotten whatever it was that I might have meant to say about it.

And when I have had too much of evil in the world (The Lives of the Caesars), I dip into The Life and Prayers of Mother Teresa by Wyatt North. http://www.amazon.com/Life-Prayers-M...sa+wyatt+north It's so cheap it was almost free.

ETA: I am sorely tempted to do a Dawn and say "read it! Read it! You have to read it! about Watch How We Walk, but then I think that if I do and people read it, I might have led them down the garden path and they won't like it at all. There are flaws and loose ends in the book but the more I think about the book, the better I think it is. A first novel without any flaws is the exception.

Last edited by netwit; 08-16-2015 at 11:26 AM..
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Old 08-16-2015, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,023,154 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
Early from the Dance is one of my favorite novels of all time; I've read it in three different editions, and don't remember typos or spelling errors (and I'm very sensitive to that sort of thing). I haven't read it on my Kindle, however.

I'm reading Barefoot to Avalon now, too. I find it particularly interesting because Payne shares with us the real-life versions of some of the events he fictionalized in Early from the Dance. You may wish to give Early another try before finishing Barefoot.

Sorry you didn't like him. Though I didn't like his two most recent novels all that much, Early from the Dance and Ruin Creek, which followed it, are books I recommend frequently.
Jay, I haven't even started Barefoot to Avalon yet -- I'm a long way away; so much work and so many other books that I've wanted to read first -- but now you've got me second-guessing about Early from the Dance. It wasn't so much the typos that irked me (although they did); the embedded dialogue made me crazy.

If you've read it three times and rank it as a favorite, there has to be something great about it. I'll give it another try at some point.


Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
ETA: I am sorely tempted to do a Dawn and say "read it! Read it! You have to read it! about Watch How We Walk, but then I think that if I do and people read it, I might have led them down the garden path and they won't like it at all.
Ha! Hahahaha!!! HAHAHAHA!!!! It's a chance you've got to take sometimes.
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Old 08-16-2015, 12:06 PM
 
Location: North Oakland
9,150 posts, read 10,890,700 times
Reputation: 14503
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Jay, I haven't even started Barefoot to Avalon yet -- I'm a long way away; so much work and so many other books that I've wanted to read first -- but now you've got me second-guessing about Early from the Dance. It wasn't so much the typos that irked me (although they did); the embedded dialogue made me crazy.

If you've read it three times and rank it as a favorite, there has to be something great about it. I'll give it another try at some point.
Get it in hardcover. The dialog will be the same--it didn't bother me; I just had to slow down a little--but I don't remember any typos.

http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0...9748323&sr=8-3

Last edited by jay5835; 08-16-2015 at 12:15 PM..
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Old 08-16-2015, 12:27 PM
 
Location: not where you are
8,757 posts, read 9,461,856 times
Reputation: 8327
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I just finished listening to the screen play of "Substance of Fire" by Jon Robin Baitz, performed by L.A. Theater Works. Overdrive media described it as "commanding drama about a New York publisher and Holocaust survivor whose decision to publish obscure political tracts threatens the future of both his company and his family."

I thought it had more to do with the indignity you feels as you grow older and the things that matter to you seem irrelevant to those younger.

Now I am listening to "Mistaken Identity" by Lisa Scottoline. I tried to listen to her "Think Twice" but the reader was irritating to listen to and I decided it would be better if I read it myself.

I've had that issue with a few books on tape of which I just had to give up on due to narrator. I'll probably revisit Cutting for Stone at some point because I gave up partly due to the narration, but the same person who gave me the book I'm currently reading, The Americanah of which I borrowed from the library but, will seek to purchase and add to my permanent collection also recommended Cutting For Stone as well as Caleb's Crossing, so eventually I'll get back to reading it in a few weeks. This in no way assures I'll fall in love with the book or make it any farther past the chapters I had already read, I don't always end up appreciating the same books others grow to love which is why I rarely look to best seller list not even for recommendations, I do enjoy reading some of the list here though, not that I always manage to end up with the ones listed, but, I'm happy to say, I have come across and picked up several great ones by reading this forum.

Last edited by TRosa; 08-16-2015 at 12:52 PM..
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Old 08-16-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,321,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post


Ha! Hahahaha!!! HAHAHAHA!!!! It's a chance you've got to take sometimes.
Yes, but I notice you don't say you're running to buy it this very minute.

(I don't think it is the book for you because of the religious theme and you've said before you don't like those. On the other hand, I think you've praised some books that sound similar to me, so I don't know whether to recommend it to you or not. I just have no idea. )
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Old 08-16-2015, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,023,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Yes, but I notice you don't say you're running to buy it this very minute.

(I don't think it is the book for you because of the religious theme and you've said before you don't like those. On the other hand, I think you've praised some books that sound similar to me, so I don't know whether to recommend it to you or not. I just have no idea. )
Hahaha! You're right. I don't *do* religion. (It's among the long list of themes that don't interest me.)

Also: my "to read" list is so ridiculously long right now that I refuse to add any more until I have time to whittle down the list, at least a bit.

PS. I'm actually more than halfway through The Invention of Wings, which I'd tried once before and tossed aside. Then you know what happened? Peer pressure, that's what happened. I gave it another go... and it's going. So, stranger things have happened. I might end up reading about a Jehovah's Witness family sooner than you think.
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Old 08-16-2015, 07:55 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,114 times
Reputation: 7237
I just finished Tell the Wolves I'm Home and I loved it! I read it quickly - in that way that I read when I'm completely engaged in the story and the characters. For a debut novel, it was a home run. Excellent character development and a trueness to the era (80s, AIDS, Bonne Belle lip gloss...)

Not sure what is next...
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:05 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,350,226 times
Reputation: 1795
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I finished Watch How We Walk by Jennifer Lovegrove yesterday Watch How We Walk: Jennifer LoveGrove: 9781770411272: Amazon.com: Books

It is the story of two young girls growing up as Jehovah's Witnesses. In many ways it is what Miriam Toews' last book should have been. It gives a look at a dysfunctional JW family and the thoughts that go on in the mind of children raised in really any kind of deep faith when it is coupled with a hidden family trauma. I dislike apostate fiction or non-fiction that takes the easy way out in bashing a faith when to the outside reader it is clear that it is the dynamics of the family within that expresses itself as something extreme in faith. The writer grew up as a JW - the book felt so true that I looked her up to be sure.

Jazzcat, I think it was you who mentioned Miriam Toews' book and was disappointed in it because it didn't really have anything in it about Mennonites? I was thinking that maybe this book might interest you.

But I will say one thing - I hated the ending. It felt like a cop-out ending to me and a more ambiguous ending would have felt truer. I gave it four stars and in spite of the ending I would recommend it. But if unhappy endings bother you, then this is not the book for you.

Here is a review from a paper:
Book Review: Watch How We Walk, by Jennifer LoveGrove | National Post And here is an interview with the writer which is very worth reading: Jennifer LoveGrove: On Jehovah’s Witnesses and writing | National Post

I added this to my TBR list. Sounds interesting to me.
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:10 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,350,226 times
Reputation: 1795
I finished Rush Home Road on Saturday. I'd give it 3 stars. I liked the story and I liked both Sharla and Addy. What I did not like that made it almost get tossed aside halfway through was the way it was written. I felt like it should have been written in 1st person, as it was not 3rd person writing IMO. I guess what I'm saying is that I felt like the 3rd person writing felt like the education level of the characters and it made it really hard for me to enjoy it. I don't know if that makes sense. I was just disappointed with that and it made it a less enjoyable read for me. Thankfully the characters and wanting to see where "they went" at the end is what kept me going. Definitely not as good as The Mountain Story and most definitely not as good as The Girls.
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Old 08-17-2015, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,023,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
I finished Rush Home Road on Saturday. I'd give it 3 stars. I liked the story and I liked both Sharla and Addy. What I did not like that made it almost get tossed aside halfway through was the way it was written. I felt like it should have been written in 1st person, as it was not 3rd person writing IMO. I guess what I'm saying is that I felt like the 3rd person writing felt like the education level of the characters and it made it really hard for me to enjoy it. I don't know if that makes sense. I was just disappointed with that and it made it a less enjoyable read for me. Thankfully the characters and wanting to see where "they went" at the end is what kept me going. Definitely not as good as The Mountain Story and most definitely not as good as The Girls.
I think that's why I gave up on it within the first few chapters.
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