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Old 08-17-2015, 08:14 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860

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I gave up on A Spot of Bother by Mark Haddon because I didn't really like the characters or care what happened to them. I did read the end to make sure I wasn't missing anything and decided I wasn't. It's domestic fiction and the writing was fine and some parts were funny. But... nah.

I've had Plainsong on my bedside table for months and finally started it. I knew I'd like it because so many here did, but it's so sad. The writing is achingly beautiful, but I really hope things turn around for these characters. I'm not very far into it, so I have hope.

Also, my library received A Little Life which I had asked them to get. I'm gearing myself up for that one. The way it was described on here tells me that it's going to take a lot out of me. <<<That's got to be a notion that only a book lover understands.
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Old 08-17-2015, 08:18 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,349,261 times
Reputation: 1795
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
I think that's why I gave up on it within the first few chapters.
I bet it is. First person would have made so much more sense with this one. Oh well, on to whatever is next.
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Old 08-17-2015, 09:20 AM
 
47,545 posts, read 6,390,635 times
Reputation: 3953
I just finished "In Harm's Way" by Doug Stanton, a 2003 book about the sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis during World War II.

After safely delivering the contents of the first atomic bomb to be assembled at Tinian, the ship was later torpedoed by a Japanese sub while it was en route to the Philippines.

A series of errors resulted in the ship's non-arrival being ignored for days, as the survivors battled hellish conditions to survive, including rampant shark attacks.

Some of the survivors were finally discovered (accidentally) by an American bomber that followed an oil slick, seeking a Japanese submarine to bomb.

It was a very gripping book, one which I read over the course of just a few days.

While other movies have been made and stories written about the disaster, a new one starring Nicholas Cage as the ship's captain, Charles Butler McVay III is scheduled for 2016.
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Old 08-17-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
A note from the Peer Pressure Files:

With a few subtle nudges, I unearthed two books that were buried deep in my Kindle. I finished The Invention of Wings (and, yup, I did enjoy it) and I'll soon start The Interestings.

I have a bunch of new releases coming to me soon, very soon, but they can wait, as can all the Richard Yates books that I collected. (I really, really liked his The Easter Parade.)
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
I added this to my TBR list. Sounds interesting to me.
Well, if you enjoy it, then maybe Dawn will read it.
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:27 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,506 times
Reputation: 5267
I thought I was reading a book about sisters growing up in a bucolic New England setting in which their parents owned a nice old-fashioned roadside motel. I knew there was family drama involved, including buried secrets, because the book cover told me so. But it didn't say it was supernatural, wth, stuff! I don't do this genre because I hate being creeped out. But by the time I figured out that something eerie was going on in The Night Sister by Jennifer McMahon I had to stick with it to find out what "it" was. Which meant I couldn't read until late in the night or every creak in my house would mean something sinister.

I finished it this morning in the broad light of day on my back porch surrounded by flowers, birds, bunnies, and other happy things. Only way I could do it. I can't say if it was any good or not since I don't normally read this genre, so maybe the more preposterous the better? Who knows. On to something else.
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Well, if you enjoy it, then maybe Dawn will read it.
Uh, the book's still going to be about religion, though, right? So... no, smartypants, I won't read it. xxo
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Old 08-17-2015, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I thought I was reading a book about sisters growing up in a bucolic New England setting in which their parents owned a nice old-fashioned roadside motel. I knew there was family drama involved, including buried secrets, because the book cover told me so. But it didn't say it was supernatural, wth, stuff! I don't do this genre because I hate being creeped out. But by the time I figured out that something eerie was going on in The Night Sister by Jennifer McMahon I had to stick with it to find out what "it" was. Which meant I couldn't read until late in the night or every creak in my house would mean something sinister.

I finished it this morning in the broad light of day on my back porch surrounded by flowers, birds, bunnies, and other happy things. Only way I could do it. I can't say if it was any good or not since I don't normally read this genre, so maybe the more preposterous the better? Who knows. On to something else.
I couldn't rep you again so soon, but, you won! BEST REVIEW EVER!
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Old 08-17-2015, 02:23 PM
 
9,238 posts, read 22,890,741 times
Reputation: 22699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I thought I was reading a book about sisters growing up in a bucolic New England setting in which their parents owned a nice old-fashioned roadside motel. I knew there was family drama involved, including buried secrets, because the book cover told me so. But it didn't say it was supernatural, wth, stuff! I don't do this genre because I hate being creeped out. But by the time I figured out that something eerie was going on in The Night Sister by Jennifer McMahon I had to stick with it to find out what "it" was. Which meant I couldn't read until late in the night or every creak in my house would mean something sinister.

I finished it this morning in the broad light of day on my back porch surrounded by flowers, birds, bunnies, and other happy things. Only way I could do it. I can't say if it was any good or not since I don't normally read this genre, so maybe the more preposterous the better? Who knows. On to something else.
I did a whole thread on Jennifer McMahon (no one really joined), because I had read all of her books in about 2 weeks and found them all very similar (all involving a central female character, going back and forth in time, uncovering some buried secret, and some eeriness that may or may not be supernatural.) I do like paranormal stuff once in a while, and she provides books that are kind of "brain candy" I read between weightier material. I need to put this new one on my list.
https://www.city-data.com/forum/books...t-but-one.html
I wonder if she's still the "U2" (all their songs sound alike to me) of mystery writers that she was when posted that.
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Old 08-17-2015, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,144,036 times
Reputation: 50802
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I am in the middle of Girl on a Train, by Paula Hawkins. Wow, this is like a descent into the hell of an alcoholic. I assume there is a happyish ending here. I sure hope so.

Great writing though. Great concept for a mystery too.
Finished! A good read. Not great literature, but really a good read. If I have ever wondered what it would be like to be addicted to alcohol, I get it now. There are a lot parallels to addiction to sweets, I think.

I am not going to give away the plot, but I'd say this is a cross between a thriller and a mystery.

I really wonder what will happen to the main character now. I wouldn't mind encountering this person in a later book, even if she is not the main character in it.
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