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Old 08-18-2015, 01:42 PM
 
Location: prescott az
6,957 posts, read 12,057,136 times
Reputation: 14244

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Lisa Gardner "Crash and Burn" and I can't put it down and don't anyone tell me the ending please.
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:15 PM
 
4,046 posts, read 2,130,991 times
Reputation: 10985
Just finished A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler. I usually enjoy her stuff, but at the very beginning of this I wondered if I could get through it. The main couple (although it does involved three or four generations of the family) seemed so bland and white-breadish. Abby, the wife-mom seemed almost daft in her determination to put a positive spin on her family and life. But then I got into it. Nothing major happens. No epiphany at the end. It's just a measure of grace that these characters (like us) get through life, even if a bit scuffed and damaged in the process. I hope this isn't Anne Tyler's last book as she has threatened, although I may be Baltimore-d and big old house-d outed. I do think interesting lives can be lived even in smaller, newer homes and don't know that Baltimore has such a uniqueness that informs how people live (is there really a Baltimore accent?).

Started Afterbirth by Elisa Alpert about a young mother who isn't doing so well physically and emotionally a year after her child is born (she objects to saying that she gave birth since the baby came into the world by a C-section). She meets an older pregnant woman who seems glamorous (former rock musician) and different than the average moms in the sleepy upstate NY college town. Although she doesn't do well typically with female friends, she makes an exception for this woman. Will see how it goes. Lots of anger in the book so far---about how women as mothers are treated.

After Birth: Elisa Albert: 9780544273733: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 08-18-2015, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Inland FL
2,529 posts, read 1,861,127 times
Reputation: 4229
The Catcher in the Rye.
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Old 08-18-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
48,518 posts, read 34,827,838 times
Reputation: 73739
Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
When I read it, I could not put it down. After reading it, I tried for a year to find something I might like as much, but there was nothing I liked as much as Stranger, at least not in the sci-fi genre.
That's good to know, I'll probably go back and revisit it when I go on vacation.
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Old 08-18-2015, 05:31 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,605,052 times
Reputation: 5267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Just finished A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler. I usually enjoy her stuff, but at the very beginning of this I wondered if I could get through it. The main couple (although it does involved three or four generations of the family) seemed so bland and white-breadish. Abby, the wife-mom seemed almost daft in her determination to put a positive spin on her family and life. But then I got into it. Nothing major happens. No epiphany at the end. It's just a measure of grace that these characters (like us) get through life, even if a bit scuffed and damaged in the process. I hope this isn't Anne Tyler's last book as she has threatened, although I may be Baltimore-d and big old house-d outed. I do think interesting lives can be lived even in smaller, newer homes and don't know that Baltimore has such a uniqueness that informs how people live (is there really a Baltimore accent?).
Jazzcat, I too thought that the main couple (Abby and Roy? Haha I've already forgotten) were not the most dynamic characters. It was his father's story that I found so surprising - that is not how I thought his and his wife's story would turn out. The fact that they kept their early beginnings so secret from the present family was a nice twist as we the readers knew more about them than the other family members did. I still like the "old house" stuff.

I don't know about the Baltimore accent but the residents seem to be as proud of their city as Charlestonians!
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Old 08-18-2015, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,147,759 times
Reputation: 50802
I just finished Benediction, by Kent Haruf. I think this is the best of his books. Parental mistakes are a contant motif with him, but I think he did this best in this book. Some of the reviews came out and all but demanded a sequel. Too bad there will be none. His last book, Our Souls at Night, isn't as fleshed out or as optimistic. And the characters from Benediction do not make an appearance.

I am thinking of re-reading Plainsong and Eventide, the two previous novels that I read over a decade ago. I like his writing style and I enjoy his characters. His books don't have a lot of plot; they are like windows into peoples actual lives. I really enjoy his books.
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Old 08-18-2015, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,319,963 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I just finished Benediction, by Kent Haruf. I think this is the best of his books. Parental mistakes are a contant motif with him, but I think he did this best in this book. Some of the reviews came out and all but demanded a sequel. Too bad there will be none. His last book, Our Souls at Night, isn't as fleshed out or as optimistic. And the characters from Benediction do not make an appearance.

I am thinking of re-reading Plainsong and Eventide, the two previous novels that I read over a decade ago. I like his writing style and I enjoy his characters. His books don't have a lot of plot; they are like windows into peoples actual lives. I really enjoy his books.
I read the Plainsong trilogy by Haruf last December. I love, love, love his work. I have never encountered an author who is able to convey human gentleness as well as Kent Haruf could. I loved the characters and the two bachelor farmers in particular and frankly, I miss them.
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Old 08-18-2015, 05:58 PM
 
Location: New Yawk
9,196 posts, read 7,229,478 times
Reputation: 15315
Game of Thrones. I don't have cable, so I haven't seen the show yet. Figure I'll read the series and should finish up by the time GoT hits Netflix.
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Old 08-18-2015, 08:13 PM
 
Location: not where you are
8,757 posts, read 9,461,856 times
Reputation: 8327
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ms.Mathlete View Post
Game of Thrones. I don't have cable, so I haven't seen the show yet. Figure I'll read the series and should finish up by the time GoT hits Netflix.
I've thought about reading some of the volumes I've not had the priveledge of viewing up to this point. I'm not sure how many pages are to each volume, but, I bet that will be quite some lengthy reading.

FYI, At this point and probably for some time to come, you have to pay extra to view it on netflix. I wasn't too thrilled to find that out, so, I instead just rented the DVDs of season 1-4 from the library. I'm waiting for season 5 to hit my library or I might just give in and pay to watch through Amazon. Either way, I'll likely rewatch season 4 via my library.
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Old 08-18-2015, 08:26 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,546,726 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Mayberry, it sounds like Winter People is even creepier. One Amazon reviewer called it "neo-Lovecraftian." Reading H.P. Lovecraft in my early 20s is what put me off horror forever. I still vaguely remember some of those gruesome images conjured up nearly 50 years later. Yeah, I'm a big chicken! And an old hen too - enjoy your sewing and story telling!
Oh. Maybe I will wait and use it for my October Halloween read. It's my scary book month.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holly-Kay View Post
LFM, I read the book mentioned above. I almost gave up on it several times but glad I read it through. It was very much a fantastical book and I don't usually do fantasy. I was very glad though, that I read through to the end, because I really felt the ending was rather perfect. I have to add that it wasn't nearly in the same league as A Man Called Ove. That book was so great that Ove was one of the names I was considering for one of my kitty twins.
Yes, I am pretty certain I will see it to the end. And I think "Ove" is a perfect name for a kitty. What will you name the other? -- I like "Und."

Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
When I read [A Stranger in a Strange Land], I could not put it down. After reading it, I tried for a year to find something I might like as much, but there was nothing I liked as much as Stranger, at least not in the sci-fi genre.
I don't generally read sci-fi anymore, though I have in the past. I looked this up in Goodreads and I like the premise. (I actually wish someone would come and talk to us humans!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
Lisa Gardner "Crash and Burn" and I can't put it down and don't anyone tell me the ending please.
I noted it was a series, so I added the first to my list. Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I just finished Benediction, by Kent Haruf. I think this is the best of his books. Parental mistakes are a contant motif with him, but I think he did this best in this book. Some of the reviews came out and all but demanded a sequel. Too bad there will be none. His last book, Our Souls at Night, isn't as fleshed out or as optimistic. And the characters from Benediction do not make an appearance.

I am thinking of re-reading Plainsong and Eventide, the two previous novels that I read over a decade ago. I like his writing style and I enjoy his characters. His books don't have a lot of plot; they are like windows into peoples actual lives. I really enjoy his books.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I read the Plainsong trilogy by Haruf last December. I love, love, love his work. I have never encountered an author who is able to convey human gentleness as well as Kent Haruf could. I loved the characters and the two bachelor farmers in particular and frankly, I miss them.
I think I actually AM a parental mistake, so I put Plainsong on the TRL. Besides, if K' loves the characters, I know I will too.
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