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Old 09-11-2015, 06:28 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,349,261 times
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I finished Pygmalion yesterday and decided to give Frankenstein a shot as someone mentioned they were reading it on here. I'm not enjoying it a whole lot and it seems slow going, but since it is short, I'm going to stick it out for a bit yet and see if things change. Thinking A Land More Kind Than Home might be up next since it's bee on my Kindle for a while and has been revived here which sent me back to read the synopsis.
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Old 09-11-2015, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
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I finished A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash. I'm so glad I read it. It reminds me a bit of Plainsong by Kent Haruf. Although Haruf's characters were dearer to me than Cash's. I plan to read Cash's other book This Dark Road To Mercy. Thanks for recommending it, Jess5.

These books are about country folk. There is something about the grit and yet gentleness that many of them possess. We generally know where we stand with them. They can be standoffish on first meeting us but that oozes into a genuine fondness as time goes by. In A Land More Kind Than Home I knew almost immediately who I would be drawn to. I've known folks like that. My maternal grandparents were country folks in east Texas and paternal grandparents were pure Brooklyn, NY. Neither was better that the other. They were just different from each other. I think a lot of the difference had to do with a love of and for the land. That is what defined my Texas relatives even though my grandfather owned and operated a small grocery store. It was not true of my NY relatives because most of the land was settled. There are no rural tobacco fields in Brooklyn. There are other things in Brooklyn that were dear to them and to me as well.

Anywho, if you enjoyed Plainsong (which I did more than I can even begin to say) you will like Cash's book. I gol dern promise y'all.
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Old 09-12-2015, 03:00 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
I finished reading "The Memory Keeper's Daughter" by Kim Edwards and though the first 40% wasn't really what I wanted from this book, the remainder more than made up for it. I liked it so much that I will probably read her other works.

Next up: "Oryx and Crake" by Margaret Atwood
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:03 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Hubby had to make a trip to the library so I went along. On the Readers' Choices shelves was a copy of "Tuna Melts My Heart" bu Courtney Dasher. I thought it looked like it might be fun, forgetting how I hate it when dog owner's put words into their dogs' mouths, or talk baby talk to them. (Actually, I hate baby talk to anyone.)

Summary: cute pics of a maybe not so cute but loveable dog, but I don't recommend the verbiage. I wouldn't buy it, but if you happen to be hanging about the library it is a nice way to pass the time.
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:16 PM
 
Location: On the East Coast
51,691 posts, read 15,690,410 times
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I am reading "Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth."

Yesterday I finished reading "90 Minutes in Heaven" by Don Piper. Amazing what that man went through and survived.
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:20 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,075,496 times
Reputation: 27092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jess5 View Post
I'm reading Go Set A Watchman.

I hope you like it better than I did .
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Old 09-12-2015, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Hi everybody! Ever have one of those days where you wake up to find your internet connection has died and you feel like you've been abandoned, lost on an ice floe somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean for weeks and weeks and you don't even know if anyone has noticed you're missing and if they are looking for you?

One day of no internet connection and it felt like a year. So, hi! once again!

Apart from that, I've been well. I finished America Elsewhere which I had tried once before and it didn't take. But this time it was a page-turner. Absolutely gripping. I was reading it in bits and pieces between a lot of work and I really just wanted to sit down and allow myself to be absorbed in the story. The writer makes a lot of very good observations and can really write. The downside is not the writing but the story, which although gripping, had a cartoonish quality to it. Nonetheless, I still recommend it and I'm going to check out the writer's other books.

It should be of interest to fans of Stephen King.

And I am so wiped out after hauling bales around, I am going straight to bed.
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Old 09-13-2015, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I finished A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash. I'm so glad I read it. It reminds me a bit of Plainsong by Kent Haruf. Although Haruf's characters were dearer to me than Cash's. I plan to read Cash's other book This Dark Road To Mercy. Thanks for recommending it, Jess5.

These books are about country folk. There is something about the grit and yet gentleness that many of them possess. We generally know where we stand with them. They can be standoffish on first meeting us but that oozes into a genuine fondness as time goes by. In A Land More Kind Than Home I knew almost immediately who I would be drawn to. I've known folks like that. My maternal grandparents were country folks in east Texas and paternal grandparents were pure Brooklyn, NY. Neither was better that the other. They were just different from each other. I think a lot of the difference had to do with a love of and for the land. That is what defined my Texas relatives even though my grandfather owned and operated a small grocery store. It was not true of my NY relatives because most of the land was settled. There are no rural tobacco fields in Brooklyn. There are other things in Brooklyn that were dear to them and to me as well.

Anywho, if you enjoyed Plainsong (which I did more than I can even begin to say) you will like Cash's book. I gol dern promise y'all.


Thanks for that one. I placed a hold at my library




I just finished Burial Rites by Hannah Kent and really enjoyed it. What a fantastic story. It is about a woman who is convicted of murdering two men in Iceland in 1828. While she awaits her execution she must stay with a family where we get to know her and what happened that terrible night. Hannah Kent did a great job of bringing this real story about Agnes Magnusdottir to life.




Now I am reading The Book Of Speculation byErika Swyler. It is a family saga about mermaids, circuses, old books and a current day reference librarian. It started off good and now is kind of fizzling for me.
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Old 09-13-2015, 07:37 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
I just finished Burial Rites by Hannah Kent and really enjoyed it. What a fantastic story. It is about a woman who is convicted of murdering two men in Iceland in 1828. While she awaits her execution she must stay with a family where we get to know her and what happened that terrible night. Hannah Kent did a great job of bringing this real story about Agnes Magnusdottir to life.
Your description captured me mid-coffee sip, so I popped over to Google and found this page link:
Ghost Stories - On the Trail of Agnes

I thought you might like the pictures.

I wish books still had pictures. I really liked that and it's rarely seen anymore.

I'm about a quarter into "Oryx and Crake" and am not really liking the story but don't seem to put it aside. I guess I need to read it.
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Old 09-13-2015, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
I finished Ian McEwan's "Enduring Love", thought it was weaker than his other very fine novels.

Picked up two by a couple of my favorite authors, David Lodge ("Changing Places") and Shirley Hazzard ("The Bay of Noon"), both sadly short, so they won't keep me busy long.
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