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Old 09-20-2015, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
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I am halfway through The Memory Painter by Gwnedolyn Womack. I like the story so far. There are some interesting characters when the "painter" goes back in time. BTW, he paints his past lives.


"What if there was a drug that could help you remember your past lives?

What if the lives you remember could lead to your one true love?

What if you learned, that for thousands of years, a deadly enemy has conspired to keep the two of you apart?"
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Old 09-20-2015, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
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I think I'm reading Fourth of July Creek. I'm not very far along but if the reviews are correct, you should probably all run out and buy it immediately. Fourth of July Creek: A Novel: Smith Henderson: 9780062286468: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 09-20-2015, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,301 times
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Im re-reading Allegiant by Veronica Roth, I love the ivergent series so much and prepping for the movie in March
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Old 09-20-2015, 03:35 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
120 posts, read 64,438 times
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I'm rereading Alice In Wonderland, and also my boyfriend and I are reading The Divine Comedy together. The Divine Comedy is really fascinating. I'm liking it a lot better than I thought I would.
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Old 09-20-2015, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,144,036 times
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Have just finished Lila, by Marilynn Robinson. I liked it best of the three Gilead books: Gilead, Home and Lila. I would recommend them highly. I think you should read them in order, but it isn't necessary to do so.

These are unusual, deeply thought out stories. Robinson can write talky stuff, dialogue and she can set a scene. But you will be immersed in them. She is an excellent writer with command of her personal style. These are not run of the mill in any respect. Gilead won the Pulitzer, by the way.
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Old 09-21-2015, 08:33 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
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Started The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri. I enjoyed The Namesake so I'm looking forward to this one as well.
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Old 09-21-2015, 08:47 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I think I'm reading Fourth of July Creek. I'm not very far along but if the reviews are correct, you should probably all run out and buy it immediately.
I never read the reviews anymore. They color my experience of reading to become instead: comparisons to a norm. I hope you come back and tell more of your experience once you've read it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WriterGirl2887 View Post
I'm rereading Alice In Wonderland, and also my boyfriend and I are reading The Divine Comedy together. The Divine Comedy is really fascinating. I'm liking it a lot better than I thought I would.
I've been thinking of picking up "Alice" again to see how I would like it now. I recall when reading it as a young girl being told it was actually written for adults and thought then that that might explain all the inexplicable aspects to the story that I perceived.

Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Have just finished Lila, by Marilynn Robinson. ... These are unusual, deeply thought out stories. Robinson can write talky stuff, dialogue and she can set a scene. But you will be immersed in them. She is an excellent writer with command of her personal style. These are not run of the mill in any respect. Gilead won the Pulitzer, by the way.
You had my interest right up to that Pulitzer comment. Seems whenever I read a Pulitze awarded work I am disappointed. Still, you DID get my interest up to that point. Maybe I will, anyway.

I just finished reading Hannah Kent's "Burial Rites" and thank you YL for that experience. I gave it five stars and this review in Goodreads:
Quote:
I hope this first novel is only the first of many. Ms Kent writes poetic prose that is not flowery and carries no excess. Her characters are not only believable, but while reading, I was transported into each character's perspective as they saw the circumstances described. Not all were likable or even admirable, but each held my sympathy and my respect. (The only other author that achieved this in my readings is Dame Maeve Binchy, but Kent's stories are not feel good stories -- they are truths resulting from events from each character's perspective.

That said, I wished that the few characters that played only limited roles might have shared a bit more with the reader to explain their actions, but the book would've been three times as long, and no longer perfect.
Next up: "Stitches in Time" by Barbara Michaels
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Old 09-21-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
Started The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri. I enjoyed The Namesake so I'm looking forward to this one as well.
Jhumpa Lahiri was recently awarded a National Humanities Medal by President Obama.
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Old 09-21-2015, 02:23 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
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I finally finished The Things that Keep us Here. It was just so-so. Some parts of it were thought-provoking and seemed so realistic - especially the parts about the family in their home with the smells, threats of danger, cold water, squabbling children... but much of it frustrated me because it just seemed so unrealistic.

On to my next book. Well, on to choosing my next book...
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Old 09-21-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I never read the reviews anymore. They color my experience of reading to become instead: comparisons to a norm. I hope you come back and tell more of your experience once you've read it.
I always read reviews. I don't always agree with them but usually I can get some sense of the credibility of the reviewer. If they can't spell, I dismiss them completely, rightly or wrongly.

But as far as this Fourth of July Creek, the writer is amazing. I have never heard of Smith Henderson, the writer, before and I don't think I have ever seen this book or the writer mentioned in this forum. I think that anyone who has enjoyed the way Donna Tartt writes, the careful way each sentence is crafted without being self-conscious or overly artsy about it, might like to read this book for the sheer beauty of the language. I am not far enough along to get a sense of the story though. I have been distracted by other stuff.

The writing has a staccato style, which suits the setting and the characters perfectly. I have rarely read a book where the words and the rhythm of the sentences themselves are part of the atmosphere of the book. Every page has something brilliant on it.

I will quote a bit to give you a sense of the words: "Her heart in its red and white cage, knocking just inches from his own, like two young prisoners tapping out simpleton Morse, I am here I am here I am here."

Another one: "She spanked her eyelashes at him..."

But he never over does it. It isn't florid or cute. I don't know about the story yet.

Fourth of July Creek by Smith Henderson

Marlow, you might like this one.
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