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Old 09-29-2015, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Berwick, Penna.
16,214 posts, read 11,327,268 times
Reputation: 20827

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I just finished Charles Leerhsen's Ty Cobb -a Terrible Beauty; Leerhsen is a general-interest sportswriter who has produced sports-related character studies in venues ranging from baseball to horse racing.

Since the production of a feature film starring Tommy Lee Jones and Ken Burns' Baseball documentary, it has become popular to depict Cobb as a Satan-figure with regard to race in baseball; the actual facts aren't as simple. Several active players of Jackie Robinson's day, most notably Enos Slaughter and Dixie Walker, actually raised much more vocal dissent. This is just one example of slant among many; Cobb was a typically-paternalistic Southern white male who clung to the values of his upbringing, and had personality imbalances likely brought on by his mother's accidental killing of his father at the start of his long career.

In 1960-61, with Cobb under treatment for multiple, and eventually fatal, medical issues, a freelance journalist named Al Stump authored an unflattering article for the pulp mens' magazine True -- later embellished into a full, and similarly unflattering biography. A good deal of fact regarding Stump and his motivation has since been brought to light.

Cobb was one of many sports heroes found to have feet of clay by modern standards, but the full portrait is a lot more complicated than simpler previous works on both sides of a polarized issue.
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Old 09-29-2015, 02:32 PM
 
4,046 posts, read 2,130,139 times
Reputation: 10980
Okay. Kick me out of the Jonathan Franzen fan club. 17 pages of Purity and I'm out. Convoluted plot, strained dialogue, characters I don't care about. Started Fates and Furies and I think this may be a go...
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Old 09-29-2015, 07:56 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I probably oversold it, but I do hope you enjoy it.

I finished The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri and highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful and the story is moving and sad. As I said earlier, it reminded me of Cutting for Stone. It's set in India and the U.S. and the story spans the lives of the characters.
I really liked other works by Lahiri. I will add it to my "For Later" list at the library if they have it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
I went to the library last night and picked up A Man Came Out Of A Door In The Mountain as well as Abandon. Will be finishing A Ballad for Sallie first though.
Over-achiever.

I took back "The Little Stranger" today. If an author cannot get the story started within 100 pages it's not the book for me.

Next up: "The Forgotten Room" by Lincoln Child.

I've got three books to read by Oct. 11th and I am a slow reader. I'd better get busy!
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:23 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
I recently started The Truth According to Us - better late than never. Though it may not be better because, so far at page 33, I'm not exactly captivated. I'll keep at it because it got such great reviews here!

Did anyone else try Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg? It was one of those books that sticks with you - I'd love to hear from any other readers.
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Old 09-29-2015, 10:22 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,049 times
Reputation: 5267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I probably oversold it, but I do hope you enjoy it.

I finished The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri and highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful and the story is moving and sad. As I said earlier, it reminded me of Cutting for Stone. It's set in India and the U.S. and the story spans the lives of the characters.
Don't worry about overselling a book, Marlowe. When I first highly recommended A Man Called Ove I felt bad that I'd recommended a book some others were finding they didn't like. But as time went on I heard more likes than dislikes. Nothing wrong with being enthusiastic about a favorite!
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Old 09-30-2015, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I recently started The Truth According to Us - better late than never. Though it may not be better because, so far at page 33, I'm not exactly captivated. I'll keep at it because it got such great reviews here!
.
Be sure to upadte. I don't know what page I got to but nothing stood out for me enough to buy it. But if you say it changes for the better, I'll reconsider.
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Old 09-30-2015, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post

I've got three books to read by Oct. 11th and I am a slow reader. I'd better get busy!
Good luck. I have three books that I am supposed to read for September, lol. It's not going to happen



Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I recently started The Truth According to Us - better late than never. Though it may not be better because, so far at page 33, I'm not exactly captivated. I'll keep at it because it got such great reviews here!

Did anyone else try Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg? It was one of those books that sticks with you - I'd love to hear from any other readers.
Good luck with The Truth According To Us. It has a very slow start and stays kind of slow. I liked it anyway but many feel the book could have been shorter(I agree).

On your recommendation I did get Did You Ever Have A Family. I have it checked out now and will read it next week.




I just finished Vanished by Kendra Elliot.
This was a good mystery about a missing eleven year old and a detective being framed for murder. I liked both the Detective Callahan and FBI Agent McLane's characters. I will read the next two in this series which right now can be downloaded for $2.00 each.

and


Our Souls At Night by Kent Haruf.
I really loved the sweetness of this book about two older people coming together for some comfort and company. I hated the ending. All I can say is the son is lucky I wasn't his mother.

I now have Plainsong on my library list.



Last night I started Miss Hazel and the Rosa Parks League by Jonathan Odell. It is very good.
"Set in pre-Civil Rights Mississippi, and inspired by his Mississippi childhood, Odell tells the story of two young mothers, Hazel and Vida – one wealthy and white and the other poor and black – who have only two things in common: the devastating loss of their children, and a deep and abiding loathing for one another.

Embittered and distrusting, Vida is harassed by Delphi’s racist sheriff and haunted by the son she lost to the world. Hazel, too, has lost a son and can’t keep a grip on her fractured life. After drunkenly crashing her car into a manger scene while gunning for the baby Jesus, Hazel is sedated and bed-ridden. Hazel’s husband hires Vida to keep tabs on his unpredictable wife and to care for his sole surviving son. Forced to spend time together with no one else to rely on, the two women find they have more in common than they thought, and together they turn the town on its head. It is the story of a town, a people, and a culture on the verge of a great change that begins with small things, like unexpected friendship."
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Old 09-30-2015, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Type 0.73 Kardashev
11,110 posts, read 9,806,194 times
Reputation: 40166
I just started Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises.

I just finished a re-read of The Road, which at the same time was more devastating and more beautifully wrought than I had remembered. I know of no writer who works the English language in a fashion anywhere close to that of Cormac McCarthy.
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Old 09-30-2015, 07:36 AM
 
3,929 posts, read 2,952,431 times
Reputation: 6175
The Gaia Codex
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Old 09-30-2015, 08:14 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
I just started Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises.

I just finished a re-read of The Road, which at the same time was more devastating and more beautifully wrought than I had remembered. I know of no writer who works the English language in a fashion anywhere close to that of Cormac McCarthy.
That is so true. I've only read a few of his things, including The Road, and I probably won't read any more. They are just so difficult to get through. Not because they're hard to understand, but because his view of the world is so dismal, and he conveys it so perfectly. At the same time, the writing is so pristine and perfect that it takes your breath away.
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