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Old 10-05-2015, 05:07 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,546,726 times
Reputation: 14770

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I'm reading Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King and ... I'm not sure.
We listened to it on audiobook and probably if I was reading it I would've put it down. It was okay to listen to but I definitely would not read the sequel. Frankly, I just thought it was twisted sick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Don't remember who recommended After the Parade by Lori Ostlund but it was an excellent read. Great writing just flows and the story of a 40-year-old man who escapes his life to start anew is fascinating. I stayed up till 2AM to finish this book.

Tried The Idea of Love by Patti Callahan Henry and just couldn't do it. I should have paid attention to the cover which shows a diaphanous pink gown. It shouted "insipid reading ahead." True.

Now I'm reading Mrs. Sinclair's Suitcase by Louise Walters. Not sure I really care about these characters yet but I'll give it a go. A woman finds a letter tucked into a book that brings her grandmother's life story into question and searches for answers.
I added the first and last to my TRL. What the heck.

Never ever would read a book with diaphanous gown on the cover.

I just finished "The Forgotten Room" by Lincoln Child. There were parts that were pretty good reading, but mostly it was just "okay."

"A Man Came Out of A Door in the Mountain" is waiting for me at the library, so I will start that tomorrow. Meanwhile, I may read one or two short stories from "The Mammoth Book of Ghost Stories by Women."
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Old 10-05-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Redding, California
306 posts, read 113,886 times
Reputation: 112
I am reading the Harry Potter books and the Percy Jackson books. Great books to read.
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:56 PM
 
4,046 posts, read 2,130,991 times
Reputation: 10985
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
We listened to it on audiobook and probably if I was reading it I would've put it down. It was okay to listen to but I definitely would not read the sequel. Frankly, I just thought it was twisted sick.
Can you explain why it was more tolerable to listen to than read? I only read. I don't think I'd like audio books, but I've honestly never tried one. So I try to ask people why they like audio. A friend recently said something similar---that she was listening to The Outlanders. She said she wouldn't want to be reading the book because parts were boring. I asked if these parts were any less boring on audio; she replied that she could zone out. But couldn't you just as easily skip pages in a book? Just trying to understand....
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Old 10-06-2015, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,147,759 times
Reputation: 50802
I just finished reading A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki. It has everything a book needs for you to get lost in. This a really good read.O
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:42 PM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,114 times
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I couldn't make it far in The Truth According to Us. I'll try it again another day but I feel especially frustrated about it because I actually bought a hardback copy so I need to find it another home so I don't feel guilty about wasting money!

I moved on to Reconstructing Amelia on loan from a friend. We'll see....
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Old 10-07-2015, 05:13 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,416,945 times
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I am actually taking a break from reading all the lovely fiction being mentioned on here ( my to be read list is every growing and I do have a bunch of things I am waiting on hold from the library....) and reading a self help book which was recommened highly.
Feeling Good Together- by David Burns. He seems to have written quite a few that look pretty good. So far its a pretty easy read, making good points, but I need to really stick with it.
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Old 10-07-2015, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,387,300 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I just finished reading A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki. It has everything a book needs for you to get lost in. This a really good read.O
Thanks…I moved it up on my library list


I finished Little Paris Bookshop. This book started out really good for me. I loved the idea of a floating bookstore and how Perdu is able to prescribe the perfect book for each customer. I would have liked the book more if it stayed on that path but it veered off to the story of Perdu's long lost love and his never getting over it. For more than 20 years the man "stopped" living. I'm glad he started his quest to find out what happened and enjoyed the people he met along the way…but 20 years. That's just plain sad.



Now I am reading The Picture of Dorian Gray for a buddy read.
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Old 10-07-2015, 05:35 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,546,726 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Can you explain why it was more tolerable to listen to than read? I only read. I don't think I'd like audio books, but I've honestly never tried one. So I try to ask people why they like audio. A friend recently said something similar---that she was listening to The Outlanders. She said she wouldn't want to be reading the book because parts were boring. I asked if these parts were any less boring on audio; she replied that she could zone out. But couldn't you just as easily skip pages in a book? Just trying to understand....
It IS certainly true that one can zone out during the boring parts, particularly when doing something else. I think for me it is also about the idea of being read to -- the human voice (for me) has connotations of being in early elementary when our teacher used to read to us for an amount of time every day. It was comforting, and no matter how scary the events in the story might be -- I wasn't alone with it. I think that has carried over into my adult years. Oddly, it is also easier for me to read a scary book than to watch a scary video. Watching is more immediate. (I've been known to leave a room during particularly scary -- or even suspenseful times!


Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I just finished reading A Tale for the Time Being, by Ruth Ozeki. It has everything a book needs for you to get lost in. This a really good read.O
I've had it on my TRL for some time, and now I've bumped it up to my "For Later" list at the library. (Sounds odd, but it's a progression I've fallen into between Goodreads and my library's Bibliocommons software.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I couldn't make it far in The Truth According to Us. I'll try it again another day but I feel especially frustrated about it because I actually bought a hardback copy so I need to find it another home so I don't feel guilty about wasting money!
Exactly why I stopped buying books, unless I've checked them out from the library and know I want to come back to them again. There are just too many duds (for me) out there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
I am actually taking a break from reading all the lovely fiction being mentioned on here ( my to be read list is every growing and I do have a bunch of things I am waiting on hold from the library....) and reading a self help book which was recommened highly.
Feeling Good Together- by David Burns. He seems to have written quite a few that look pretty good. So far its a pretty easy read, making good points, but I need to really stick with it.
If you need it, you will receive it.

Speaking of audio, I started listening to David Gilman's "The Devil's Breath" a couple of days ago to accompany my sewing. It's good enough that I took it with me while I drove into Seattle yesterday (knowing the traffic can always turn a five minute trip into 50). It's well told, but it's still about a 15 year old teenage boy escaping professional killers to find his missing father in Africa. Definitely I am not the intended audience for this book, but it is keeping my sewing exciting.
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Old 10-07-2015, 09:44 AM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,605,052 times
Reputation: 5267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Can you explain why it was more tolerable to listen to than read? I only read. I don't think I'd like audio books, but I've honestly never tried one. So I try to ask people why they like audio. A friend recently said something similar---that she was listening to The Outlanders. She said she wouldn't want to be reading the book because parts were boring. I asked if these parts were any less boring on audio; she replied that she could zone out. But couldn't you just as easily skip pages in a book? Just trying to understand....
I agree with Mayberry that there's something to be said for being read to. But it's all about the narrator's voice. No matter how good the book, if the voice annoys you can't do it.

I have more patience with an audiobook than I might with a printed book. I remember listening to Annie Proulx's Bird Cloud about a house she built in Wyoming. She started with a long memoir of her family which I might have skipped over in print but ultimately was glad I listened to.

Conversely, I cannot read a sex scene that goes into detail. Uh, no. So I fast forward through those and it sounds like birds chirping which is music to my ears and I can use my own imagination, but thanks anyway!
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Old 10-07-2015, 08:02 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,546,726 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I agree with Mayberry that there's something to be said for being read to. But it's all about the narrator's voice. No matter how good the book, if the voice annoys you can't do it.

I have more patience with an audiobook than I might with a printed book. I remember listening to Annie Proulx's Bird Cloud about a house she built in Wyoming. She started with a long memoir of her family which I might have skipped over in print but ultimately was glad I listened to.

Conversely, I cannot read a sex scene that goes into detail. Uh, no. So I fast forward through those and it sounds like birds chirping which is music to my ears and I can use my own imagination, but thanks anyway!
I so agree with you on all three points. In fact, I've never thought of sex as a spectator sport, so I generally flip through the pages -- or leave the room if it's a video. No, I am not a prude; I am also not a voyeur.
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