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Old 10-27-2015, 02:38 PM
 
Location: WNC
1,571 posts, read 2,967,633 times
Reputation: 1621

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I've stayed clear of these forever, but recently saw a movie based on one of his works and now I want to read them all!

with the exception of a book or two in the series, they're addicting to read. If you ever start the series, read in chronological order instead of publication order.
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Old 10-27-2015, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,140,668 times
Reputation: 50802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I remember reading this and enjoying it. Watch for surprise twist (if I recall correctly.)
OK. I have found it interesting so far. Good characters.
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Old 10-28-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: NYC
443 posts, read 437,401 times
Reputation: 942
Reading Jane Austen's Persuasion.
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
I read the first few pages of James Agee's "Death in the Family" last night, which I picked up at a thrift shop, but I want to save it for a time when I have nothing else to read. I can go to the library today and get something else. I read it decades ago, and want to re-read it, I expect now to have a whole new appreciation for it.

By the way, I consider "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men" to be one of the dozen most important books I've ever read. Absolutely essential reading for any American.
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Old 10-28-2015, 04:49 PM
 
Location: USA
73 posts, read 85,092 times
Reputation: 104
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Old 10-28-2015, 06:27 PM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,427,533 times
Reputation: 608
CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,140,668 times
Reputation: 50802
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I read the first few pages of James Agee's "Death in the Family" last night, which I picked up at a thrift shop, but I want to save it for a time when I have nothing else to read. I can go to the library today and get something else. I read it decades ago, and want to re-read it, I expect now to have a whole new appreciation for it.

By the way, I consider "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men" to be one of the dozen most important books I've ever read. Absolutely essential reading for any American.
Yes! I had to read A Death in the Family, by James Agee in H.S. I read it again as an adult just a few years ago. It was so much better for me the second time. You know, it doesn't take that long to read. I loved several aspects of that book. His descriptions of suburban life in the early 20th century are so poignant. And then the section where the mourners are detecting a spirit moving in the house.

I also had to read Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, in H.S. I remember being struck by the poverty of the people. When I visited NYC, about 20 years ago, there was an exhibit of those photos found in the book and others from that time. It was amazing revising them. I don't have a really good memory of it anymore, but it made a big impression on my when I read it. I should revisit that book, I think.

Thanks for reminding me of that title.
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Old 10-28-2015, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,140,668 times
Reputation: 50802
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
OK. I have found it interesting so far. Good characters.
I finished it last night, and I did enjoy it. I found similarities to Olive Kitteridge, in that the central character is described through other's eyes before we really begin to know him. Strout writes well and she constructs a good book. I thought all the characters were interesting. They weren't always likeable, but they seemed quite human. I would recommend the book.
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Old 10-28-2015, 10:01 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,049 times
Reputation: 5267
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I finished it last night, and I did enjoy it. I found similarities to Olive Kitteridge, in that the central character is described through other's eyes before we really begin to know him. Strout writes well and she constructs a good book. I thought all the characters were interesting. They weren't always likeable, but they seemed quite human. I would recommend the book.
Yes, you're right, and she is a good writer.
I finally got my teeth into a book, The Drowning Ground by James Marrison. Nice British mystery. Can't go wrong.
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Old 10-29-2015, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Library pickup of "Farewell to Arms" by Hemingway, an author I have not read in 40 years or so, and even then, I thought I must be missing something. It is hard to find a book in a college library by Hemingway. For every book BY Hemingway, there were a hundred ABOUT Hemingway, all indiscriminately clustered willy nilly on the shelf, thanks to a new cataloging system created by and for idiots. I read a couple of chapters last night, and it was disappointing. No doubt there is some valuable insight in his stories, but I'm not sure I want to spend ten or twenty hours reading declarative SVO sentences of monosyllabic words to get there. Didn't the man have a thesaurus? "The leaves on the trees were green."

So, on to "La Carreta", by the mysterious B. Traven (Treasure of Sierra Madre fame), who in my opinion was a much better writer then Hemingway, and had more to say, and knew more about it from his personal experiences, and was probably a more interesting guy into the bargain. The Traven book I really want to read ("The White Rose") is on the library shelf, but in some goofy pirate edition in which about 100 pages printed badly and are all faded and nearly impossible to read, and I'm probably the only person who has ever thumbed through it. Where the library acquired the Traven works is anybody's guess, but they have some very strange donated collections, including over a thousand old sci-fi paperbacks. There are a few copies if "White Rose" on Amazon, all for over $25.

Last edited by jtur88; 10-29-2015 at 07:07 AM..
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