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Old 10-29-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: USA
73 posts, read 85,103 times
Reputation: 104

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^^^^^^^

Yeah...no great feat, being a better writer than Hemingway, eh?

I always found Hemingway to be, well, I don't know, "juvenile?" Like a high school kid wrote it? Very simple and pedestrian. Waaay overrated. How did he get so famous. maybe somebody can explain it to me? I don't get it. I don't think he went very far in school, did he? LOL I think he's just lucky he had some good stories to tell. some grist for the mill. like being ambulance driver in WWI.

my favorite book of his is The Old Man and the Sea. The ending almost made me cry. "the old man was dreaming about the lions again."
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Old 10-29-2015, 05:00 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slap_Shot View Post
^^^^^^^

Yeah...no great feat, being a better writer than Hemingway, eh?

I always found Hemingway to be, well, I don't know, "juvenile?" Like a high school kid wrote it? Very simple and pedestrian. Waaay overrated. How did he get so famous. maybe somebody can explain it to me? I don't get it. I don't think he went very far in school, did he? LOL I think he's just lucky he had some good stories to tell. some grist for the mill. like being ambulance driver in WWI.

my favorite book of his is The Old Man and the Sea. The ending almost made me cry. "the old man was dreaming about the lions again."
You'd have to be familiar with the literature being written prior to his arrival on the scene -- lots of long, flowing, flowery sentences (William Faulkner was the worst IMO). When Hemingway published, the literary world was raving about his clarity and conciseness. Today's readership has different expectations from authors. Our world is faster and we want our stories faster, and we tend to want our plots gripping, our characters believable, etc, etc. Our world view is larger than most of his readership, so he brought a new world to their eyes that to us is well, sort of ho-hum.
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Old 10-29-2015, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
I finished reading Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson.

What a page-turner. His books are always so well written and researched. It was money well spent. I learned a lot by reading the book and I didn't feel like it was a chore at all. I enjoyed it.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I finished reading Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson.

What a page-turner. His books are always so well written and researched. It was money well spent. I learned a lot by reading the book and I didn't feel like it was a chore at all. I enjoyed it.

I agree…it was a wonderful book…not the topic but the writing. Erik Larson makes history fun to learn



I just finished a couple of mystery/thrillers:

Eeny Meeny which has been on my list for awhile now. It is about a killer who abducts two people at a time and leaves them trapped with nothing but a gun and one bullet. There can only be one survivor and that one will be set free. It's your choice. The lead detective on the case is a damaged woman who I am looking forward to reading more about in future books.

It is not gruesome for those who want to know



In The Dark Dark Wood which was a freebie from the publisher. It's about a woman who invites old friends to her "Hen" party. She hasn't seen one of them in 10 years and there is some unfinished business with an old boyfriend in the mix. Add a creepy house in the woods, a crazy "new" friend, and a crime to be solved. It was OK but nothing really great.



Now I am reading Cicada Spring….did you know Brood IV cicadas emerge from underground every 17 years. I never knew that….
Periodical Cicadas | 17 Year Cicadas | Magicicada Broods & Maps

Anyway back to the book. It is set in 1979 where a 15 year old girl is raped(no details). She says it is by someone who everyone knows and it is about to tear this small town apart.
http://www.amazon.com/Cicada-Spring-...=cicada+spring
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Old 10-30-2015, 08:36 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
The farther along I get in How to Start a Fire the more I like it. While in some ways it's a fairly typical novel of 3 friends' relationship over about 20 years (betrayals, self-destruction, failures, redemption), Lisa Lutz has a gift for dialog and for drawing complex, likeable characters, even if they are not always completely believable. I recommended it.
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Old 10-30-2015, 12:43 PM
 
Location: USA
73 posts, read 85,103 times
Reputation: 104
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
You'd have to be familiar with the literature being written prior to his arrival on the scene -- lots of long, flowing, flowery sentences (William Faulkner was the worst IMO). When Hemingway published, the literary world was raving about his clarity and conciseness. Today's readership has different expectations from authors. Our world is faster and we want our stories faster, and we tend to want our plots gripping, our characters believable, etc, etc. Our world view is larger than most of his readership, so he brought a new world to their eyes that to us is well, sort of ho-hum.
thank you for the info. you make some good points. I know what you mean about Faulkner. I had to read The Sound and the Fury in college and it was like wading through quicksand. And talking about flowery, nobody beats Dickens. My mom loves him but I always find him a chore to read. I heard that part of the reason some of those old guys wrote so verbosely is that some of them back in the day were payed by the word. LOL. this explains a lot.
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Old 10-30-2015, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Calgary, Canada
1,163 posts, read 1,236,301 times
Reputation: 1205
Im reading Saving Grace by Pamela Fagan Hutchins
its a quirky mystery detective type book with good humour and good descriptions especially about a Caribbean island in the book

http://www.amazon.ca/Saving-Grace-Ka...s=saving+grace

its free to get on the Kindle too
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Old 10-30-2015, 05:05 PM
 
Location: CO
2,453 posts, read 3,604,506 times
Reputation: 5267
Finally got around to reading Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg, which many of you recommended. I really liked it and was particularly intrigued with how the story unfolded from various points of view. Though at first I had to go back to previous chapters to recall who that particular character was!

My only quibble with this book was the inclusion of the lottery scam artist who phoned Lydia every day for six months. Whaaaat? Yeah, she poured out a necessary part of the story to him so I realize he was a vehicle for that confession, but how about something believable? But that was a minor blip in the big picture, and this book gets a thumbs-up from me.
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Old 10-31-2015, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Finally got around to reading Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg, which many of you recommended. I really liked it and was particularly intrigued with how the story unfolded from various points of view. Though at first I had to go back to previous chapters to recall who that particular character was!

My only quibble with this book was the inclusion of the lottery scam artist who phoned Lydia every day for six months. Whaaaat? Yeah, she poured out a necessary part of the story to him so I realize he was a vehicle for that confession, but how about something believable? But that was a minor blip in the big picture, and this book gets a thumbs-up from me.

Great book. Yes the lottery scam guy was a bit far fetched but then again Lydia was a very lonely and sad woman…who knows?
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Old 10-31-2015, 06:48 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
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well, I am finally reading again. I am not sure what drew me to this book other than it's one of the older ones that is free on kindle- but I have THE CLAVERLINGS by Anthony Trollope and started to read it while we were traveling. Somehow it is the right book at the right time, but the only thing that is amazing me is how long it seems to be. I feel like I have been reading it for hours and hours, and I am now at 36%. In any case, it is a fun read, and seems to me to be a great example of the genre of Victorian (not sure of the right classifcations but you get my drift). I hope I can stick with it and then I will likely read something else by Trollope (but I might seek a shorter book). The Claverings: An Introduction
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