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Old 11-17-2015, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950

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Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
Not really reading, more like slogging through Jude the Obscure. I've been working on it for weeks and I'm still not more than 3/4 through. I only decided to read it because it's (supposably, as my granddaughter says) one of the World's Best Novels.

Hardy could have used a really good editor, unless, of course, he was being paid by the word.
Yes, I like the verbosity of Dickens. The difference? Dickens' prose is melodic. He uses the language as it was intended. Hardy just says the same things over and over and over.

I need some Hemingway for a palate-cleanse.

Hmm…I'm not sure about that one but maybe some day I will give it a try.
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Old 11-17-2015, 08:08 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Last night I finished "The Center of Everything" by Laura Moriarty, and didn't review it right away because it left me with so many things to consider. There is a lot of punch packed into this pint-sized novel. Finally, I think the whirling thoughts have settled enough for me to say this:

I think this was her first published novel and the writing was seamless. Her characters were true to life -- sometimes depressingly so, but not so depressing to force me to turn away from them. Each faced their life's deck of cards and played them bravely -- even those that cut and ran.

I think there is something to be learned herein for each of us. Ms Moriarty brings life's issues to bear in a manner that refutes "pat answers" -- letting them be seen through the "eyes of babes" and question our adult "truths." She shores us up with the knowledge that whatever we face, we are not alone but face with the help of our friends and family, no matter how weak or strong they might be.

I like that in a book and am looking forward to seeing how she grows through her successive works.
I enjoyed The Chaperone by her and will keep an eye out for this one.
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Old 11-17-2015, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Middle of the valley
48,518 posts, read 34,821,209 times
Reputation: 73734
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Last night I finished "The Center of Everything" by Laura Moriarty, and didn't review it right away because it left me with so many things to consider. There is a lot of punch packed into this pint-sized novel. Finally, I think the whirling thoughts have settled enough for me to say this:

I think this was her first published novel and the writing was seamless. Her characters were true to life -- sometimes depressingly so, but not so depressing to force me to turn away from them. Each faced their life's deck of cards and played them bravely -- even those that cut and ran.

I think there is something to be learned herein for each of us. Ms Moriarty brings life's issues to bear in a manner that refutes "pat answers" -- letting them be seen through the "eyes of babes" and question our adult "truths." She shores us up with the knowledge that whatever we face, we are not alone but face with the help of our friends and family, no matter how weak or strong they might be.

I like that in a book and am looking forward to seeing how she grows through her successive works.

Your reviews are written better than a lot of books I read.
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Old 11-18-2015, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
For no real reason at all, your description reminded me of a book I read and loved years ago called Fair and Tender Ladies by Lee Smith. It's an epistolary novel and the letters start when the girl/writer is very young and continue through old age. I've read it a couple of times and may be due for a reread. I've read other stuff by Smith but never liked it as much. (Now I realize that the reason I thought of it is probably because the author you talked about has "Smith" for a first name. Crazy brain connections.)

I just started Fair and Tender Ladies last night. It is a a book about a woman in VA and her life is told through her letters. So far it is pretty good.
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Old 11-18-2015, 05:47 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Last night I finished "The Center of Everything" by Laura Moriarty, and didn't review it right away because it left me with so many things to consider. There is a lot of punch packed into this pint-sized novel. Finally, I think the whirling thoughts have settled enough for me to say this:

I think this was her first published novel and the writing was seamless. Her characters were true to life -- sometimes depressingly so, but not so depressing to force me to turn away from them. Each faced their life's deck of cards and played them bravely -- even those that cut and ran.

I think there is something to be learned herein for each of us. Ms Moriarty brings life's issues to bear in a manner that refutes "pat answers" -- letting them be seen through the "eyes of babes" and question our adult "truths." She shores us up with the knowledge that whatever we face, we are not alone but face with the help of our friends and family, no matter how weak or strong they might be.

I like that in a book and am looking forward to seeing how she grows through her successive works.
Great review - I've added this one to my TBR list!
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Old 11-18-2015, 05:52 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
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I'm reading Cage of Stars by Jacquelyn Mitchard. I randomly picked it up from the book swap bin at the local marina when I finished a book while at the lake and didn't have a back-up. Two little girls from a Mormon family are murdered by a mentally ill man while in the care of their older sister. The book is the story of the older sister's struggle to deal with the emotional aftermath through the years after her parents forgive the murderer and want for her to do so as well.
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Old 11-18-2015, 05:49 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I'm reading Cage of Stars by Jacquelyn Mitchard. I randomly picked it up from the book swap bin at the local marina when I finished a book while at the lake and didn't have a back-up. Two little girls from a Mormon family are murdered by a mentally ill man while in the care of their older sister. The book is the story of the older sister's struggle to deal with the emotional aftermath through the years after her parents forgive the murderer and want for her to do so as well.
Wow, just the thought of it is a gut puncher. I know it is better to forgive, but I suspect there's a lot of self-recrimination in there that makes it doubly tough.

I finished listening to "The Help" yesterday, and they really did a great job of the readings -- different women to read the different parts, though I thought Skeeter's voice was too young.

I was a young girl in a lily white community in Michigan in that era (early 60s), when my mom was trying to dress like Jackie, and had the ladies luncheons. We didn't have black people at all, except the old couple -- the Tims, that had a junk yard next to my dad's grocery store. He used to come fetch me when I was in the store with Dad. He would take me to Mrs. Tim's kitchen where we could chat and have our milk and cookies. I remember asking Mrs Tim if they'd been burnt as babies and was that why their skin was black. I could really relate to Skeeter's predicament -- living in the middle. Too bad there wasn't such a story published then, as it was in the book.

Now I am onto Walter Mosley's "Devil in a Blue Dress." I love Mosley's writings, but this is the first of his Easy Rawling's series so I am looking forward to see if I like it as well.

On the audio, I am listening to a YA action adventure: "The Medusa Plot" by Gordon Korman. (The 39 Clues: Cahills vs. Vespers #1) I take it that it's something of a modern day Nancy Drew/Hardy Boys series, where different authors write different installments but each is a stand alone story. I am usually disappointed with YA, but there have been some good ones.
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Old 11-18-2015, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
I just started Fair and Tender Ladies last night. It is a a book about a woman in VA and her life is told through her letters. So far it is pretty good.
Awww shucks. If the title was Jailed Fair and Tender Ladies you would have your J book for 2015.
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Old 11-19-2015, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
The Carreta, by B. Traven. I am really fascinated by Traven's books. He did not know how to craft a novel, so he did it his own way. He lived among the Indians of a remote village in southern Mexico a hundred years ago, and has written several novels which are basically accounts of life in that culture. The Carreta follows the life of a young boy growing up, but the book is 99% societal scenery and commentary, and only occasionally comes back to the protagonist.

Traven, presumably an anonymous German vagrant, wrote with Sinclair Lewis' disdain for modern economics and classism. I can imagine him locking horns with Ayn Rand.
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Old 11-19-2015, 10:42 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,844,099 times
Reputation: 5201
Finished~Saving Ceecee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman It was a hard-to-put-down read and I gave it 4-stars!

Now I am reading another on my Kindle~The Night Gardener by Jonathan Auxier
A Victorian ghost story with shades of Washington Irving and Henry James. More than just a spooky tale, it’s also a moral fable about human greed and the power of storytelling.
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