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Old 01-13-2016, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,316,797 times
Reputation: 9858

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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
May I interject here about the part where dogs don't go to heaven ? I had a preacher tell me that he believed that dogs do go to heaven and that they will be waiting on us there when we cross over ...so I don't think all Christianity thinks that way just to point that out and that dogs name is barnabas and I love those jan karon books myself but hey that is me .. Have you read the boston girl by anita diamont yet ? you would most likely like that one I did cause it reminds me of my jewish relatives on my mothers side ...let me know what you thought of when you read it okay ?
Martin Luther said, "Fear not, little dog, thou too, in the Resurrection, shall have a tail of gold."

I'm putting together a photo book of the dogs I've had throughout my life and came across that quote. It will make it into the photo book.
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Old 01-13-2016, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Schaumburg
759 posts, read 3,143,622 times
Reputation: 964
I listened/am listening to a bunch of books, some for the second time ( I work 2 jobs and have long commutes). I also prefer audio so I can clean or do other home projects:

The Good:

Hot Flash Club series by Nancy Thayer (one of the best series I have listened to, great narrator, great books--especially if you are late 40s and uup)

House on Tradd Street series by Karen White--I am re-listening to this series, also very good

What She Knew by Gilly MacGillan--first time author, very good book about a divorced woman who lost her son in the woods, enjoyed it a lot, gives POV from the police and the mothe


In a Dark, Dark Wood - Ruth Ware - very good book by another first time author.

The Not So Good:

Luckiest Girl ALive - Jessica Knoll Started out okay, but was just so-so. I also don't like books which the characters continually denigrate a political party--way to tee off 50% of your audience. And politics had nothing to do with this book!

Stephen King's Bazaar of Bad Dreams--sigh, I miss when Stephen King used to scare the crap out of me



I am eagerly awaiting the release of Ann Leary's (The Good House) new book "The Children" due in May.
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Old 01-13-2016, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,383,288 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post

I picked up The Wright Brothers by David McCullough. I've loved the other stuff I've read by him.
Enjoy…I want to read that one this year. I had it checked out once from my library but sadly never got to it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I finished listening to "The Kite Runner" yesterday, read by the author The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini.

His writing was riveting. I was thrilled by the two boys playing, dismayed when the glimmer of darker thoughts colored that rosy picture, and enraged by its ugly head rearing over them, destroying those halcyon days. I considered not reading further, so angry with the character's lack of backbone. And then the roller coaster started to rise again. (Yes, apparently though I am almost 60 I am still too impressionable. )

I gave it five stars. I already added his next book to my TRL.
Another one on my list. I loved A Thousand Splendid Suns


Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
Excellent description of it! I thought A Thousand Splendid Suns was even better than The Kite Runner. Makes me think I should be reading his other one now, but enjoying Plainsong so another day.

Isn't it good?


Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
May I interject here about the part where dogs don't go to heaven ? I had a preacher tell me that he believed that dogs do go to heaven and that they will be waiting on us there when we cross over ...so I don't think all Christianity thinks that way just to point that out and that dogs name is barnabas and I love those jan karon books myself but hey that is me .. Have you read the boston girl by anita diamont yet ? you would most likely like that one I did cause it reminds me of my jewish relatives on my mothers side ...let me know what you thought of when you read it okay ?
Oh yeah…than I am happy for dogs. I guess it depends on your version/bible.

Yes…I liked Boston Girl. I love my characters to have back bones and when they don't they sadly disappoint me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
Given how well Verghese wrote "Cutting for Stone" I have to add this one to my TRL. If he endorses it in he forward, it has to mean it's good -- right?


I added Plainsong to my TRL based on your earlier post. No worries, good books are good whenever they are read.
Read Plainsong…you will like it


Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Martin Luther said, "Fear not, little dog, thou too, in the Resurrection, shall have a tail of gold."

I'm putting together a photo book of the dogs I've had throughout my life and came across that quote. It will make it into the photo book.
Kudos to MLK…a good man.

Aww that is sweet. Are you doing it yourself or using a company? My stepdaughter likes Shutterfly to make picture books. I don't have any of my own pictures before my 20's let alone all my pets, lol.




I went to the Thrift store and picked up 8 books for $2.00 but then I went to the library and my "newly" owned books will have to wait.

Next up:
'Til The Well Runs Dry by Lauren Francis-Sharma
"A glorious and moving multigenerational, multicultural saga that sweeps from the 1940s through the 1960s in Trinidad and the United States.

In a seaside village in the north of Trinidad, young Marcia Garcia, a gifted and smart-mouthed sixteen-year-old seamstress, lives alone, raising two small boys and guarding a family secret. When she meets Farouk Karam, an ambitious young policeman (so taken with Marcia that he elicits help from a tea-brewing obeah woman to guarantee her ardor), the rewards and risks in Marcia's life amplify forever.

'Til the Well Runs Dry sees Marcia and Farouk from their sassy and passionate courtship through personal and historical events that threaten Marcia's secret, entangle the couple and their children in a tumultuous scandal, and put the future in doubt for all of them.

With this deeply human novel, Lauren Francis-Sharma gives us an unforgettable story about a woman's love for a man, a mother's love for her children, and a people's love for an island rich with calypso and Carnival, cricket and salty air, sweet fruits and spicy stews-a story of grit, imperfection, steadfast love and of Trinidad that has never been told before."


and:
A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra
"In a small rural village in Chechnya, eight-year-old Havaa watches from the woods as Russian soldiers abduct her father in the middle of the night and then set fire to her home. When their lifelong neighbor Akhmed finds Havaa hiding in the forest with a strange blue suitcase, he makes a decision that will forever change their lives. He will seek refuge at the abandoned hospital where the sole remaining doctor, Sonja Rabina, treats the wounded.

For Sonja, the arrival of Akhmed and Havaa is an unwelcome surprise. Weary and overburdened, she has no desire to take on additional risk and responsibility. But over the course of five extraordinary days, Sonja’s world will shift on its axis and reveal the intricate pattern of connections that weaves together the pasts of these three unlikely companions and unexpectedly decides their fate. A story of the transcendent power of love in wartime, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena is a work of sweeping breadth, profound compassion, and lasting significance."
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Old 01-13-2016, 05:11 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,348,993 times
Reputation: 1795
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I just put a hold on the childrens blizzard by david laskin at my library it sounds interesting and as some of you may know I was a history major in college so things like this interest me . So kudos and thank you to the poster that mentioned this book on your list . after you read it I will let you know .
You may enjoy reading this: https://www.minnpost.com/minnesota-h...ampaign=buffer

Also, a hard to find and less known book that I read about a blizzard in 1880 is Blizzard by L R Lehmann (published in 1997). It is the (true) story of a 14-year-old boy who gets caught out in a blizzard and what he endured.
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Old 01-13-2016, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,140,668 times
Reputation: 50802
I started reading Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner. i wish I could rave about this book, but I am finding it boring. And the narrator is such a bitter old man. I don't know how much longer I can stick with it. This book won the Pulitzer for fiction in 1972. And Wikipedia says, "In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Angle of Repose #82 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century." I want to ask them why.

Sometime you just don't click with a book. I think I'll read another chapter, and then decide whether to continue. I've read 83 pp so far.
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Old 01-14-2016, 01:56 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,843,617 times
Reputation: 5201
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I just put a hold on the childrens blizzard by david laskin at my library it sounds interesting and as some of you may know I was a history major in college so things like this interest me . So kudos and thank you to the poster that mentioned this book on your list . after you read it I will let you know .

The Children's Blizzard is an AWESOME read! I also loved~ The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan.
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Old 01-14-2016, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,316,797 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post

Kudos to MLK…a good man.

Aww that is sweet. Are you doing it yourself or using a company? My stepdaughter likes Shutterfly to make picture books. I don't have any of my own pictures before my 20's let alone all my pets
Not Martin Luther King, Martin Luther, the father of the Reformation. What do you mean you don't have any of your own pictures before your 20s? I'm using Mixbook. I can't remember why - I must have done some research on it when I made photo books for my father and mother. Maybe it was because they have deals on their books all the time.


I wish I had more photos of the dogs who have owned me - I have a lot of photos of my recent dogs after the advent of digital cameras but not so many of my past dogs, so it is going to be a lopsided book in that way but at least I will have those photos all in one place rather than in shoeboxes that never get looked at. On the other hand, looking at the photos of the dogs who have gone is breaking my heart more than a little.


I've been reading a couple of Walter Tevis books via Kindle Unlimited. I am really impressed by him. He is a science fiction writer but he has a literary quality to his writing that is lacking in much science fiction. I read The Man Who Fell to Earth and The Steps of the Sun and am now on Mockingbird. They are somewhat dated in how the future was perceived then - at the time he wrote the books, people had more of a Jetson's view of the future but the writing itself is often gorgeous and has a timeless quality. It isn't one dimensional.
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Old 01-14-2016, 04:40 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,383,288 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
You may enjoy reading this: https://www.minnpost.com/minnesota-h...ampaign=buffer

Also, a hard to find and less known book that I read about a blizzard in 1880 is Blizzard by L R Lehmann (published in 1997). It is the (true) story of a 14-year-old boy who gets caught out in a blizzard and what he endured.
I never knew about that one. Mother Nature can be so sad and devastating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I started reading Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner. i wish I could rave about this book, but I am finding it boring. And the narrator is such a bitter old man. I don't know how much longer I can stick with it. This book won the Pulitzer for fiction in 1972. And Wikipedia says, "In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Angle of Repose #82 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century." I want to ask them why.

Sometime you just don't click with a book. I think I'll read another chapter, and then decide whether to continue. I've read 83 pp so far.
It happens…move on and read a better one

Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
The Children's Blizzard is an AWESOME read! I also loved~ The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan.
I added Children's Blizzard to my list and I have the other one on it


Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Not Martin Luther King, Martin Luther, the father of the Reformation. What do you mean you don't have any of your own pictures before your 20s? I'm using Mixbook. I can't remember why - I must have done some research on it when I made photo books for my father and mother. Maybe it was because they have deals on their books all the time.

OK…thanks for clarifying. I will have to look him up. I do like to learn. Hmm…brief story. I went off to college when I was 17. In the meantime my mother moved and got rid of everything I had and all of our pictures. Then in my 20's I just never really took many pictures. I only started when Mike and I built our off grid home…so only pics of one dog but lots of memories of all my pets. I will look into Mixbook and tell my stepdaughter. BTW, don't ever use Walmart for picture books. Nicole said they were horrendous



I wish I had more photos of the dogs who have owned me - I have a lot of photos of my recent dogs after the advent of digital cameras but not so many of my past dogs, so it is going to be a lopsided book in that way but at least I will have those photos all in one place rather than in shoeboxes that never get looked at. On the other hand, looking at the photos of the dogs who have gone is breaking my heart more than a little.

"dogs who have owned me"…ha, ha. Isn't that the truth. My pug now is almost 13 and she has old lady "issues"…she has me well trained and boy has she gotten cranky, lol. It will be nice for you to have the pictures together so you can look at them. So much better then in a box.

Digital changed pictures everything. It is so easy to snap and it is free now. When we had to pay for film we were thrifty.


This is so true of today She is enjoying the moment




I'm off to a huge RV show today so no reading today. Well….maybe tonight
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Old 01-14-2016, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,016,638 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I started reading Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner. i wish I could rave about this book, but I am finding it boring. And the narrator is such a bitter old man. I don't know how much longer I can stick with it. This book won the Pulitzer for fiction in 1972. And Wikipedia says, "In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Angle of Repose #82 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century." I want to ask them why.

Sometime you just don't click with a book. I think I'll read another chapter, and then decide whether to continue. I've read 83 pp so far.
The first (and only) book by Wallace Stegner that I read was fabulous. I tried to read some others by him but failed miserably. The book that I loved by him -- and ranks among my top 3 books ever -- is Crossing to Safety. Everyone will see themselves in one of the four main characters. The book was... ahhhh. I have no words. I loved every page.
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Old 01-14-2016, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
23,656 posts, read 13,969,723 times
Reputation: 18856
Just, right now, finished The Great Train Robbery by Crichton
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