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Old 02-10-2016, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,254,113 times
Reputation: 3809

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I so agree. Just thinking about them and their ilk makes my heart flutter -- and not in a good way. I am so glad we didn't have kids. I am convinced that we will be in Corporate work camps before this century is done.

I started reading the second in Ken Goddard's trilogy, "Outer Perimeter" -- the second novel following "First Evidence." I'm on page 20 and already the thrill is on.
Agree. I'm glad I don't have grandchildren.
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Old 02-11-2016, 04:16 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,845,164 times
Reputation: 5201
Already finished Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America's Eyeballs by Gina Keating 5-star read!
Now I know who to blame for the end of VHS and the change to DVD, because they were cheaper to mail!
Really fascinating read about the history/growth of Netflix, from VHS to DVD to today's streaming movies, and how those two brilliant young men were behind those changes.

Now I'm reading ~Lab 257: The Disturbing Story of the Government's Secret Plum Island Germ Laboratory by Michael C. Carroll Based on declassified government documents, in-depth interviews, and access to Plum Island itself, this is an eye-opening, suspenseful account of a federal government germ laboratory gone terribly wrong. For the first time, Lab 257 takes you deep inside this secret world and presents startling revelations on virus outbreaks, biological meltdowns, infected workers, the periodic flushing of contaminated raw sewage into area waters, and the insidious connections between Plum Island, Lyme disease, and the deadly West Nile virus. The book also probes what's in store for Plum Island's new owner, the Department of Homeland Security, in this age of bioterrorism.


Seems like it is mostly nonfiction that gives me the most thrilling reads.
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:12 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,932,114 times
Reputation: 7237
I put The Nightingale aside and have moved on to What Was Mine by Helen Klein Ross. I cant even remember why I had put this one on my Kindle, but there it sits.


Oddly, one of the recommendation blurbs at the front describes it as "this urgent novel..." First of all, how urgent can it be if it has saw quietly on my Kindle for a few weeks and secondly, don't I get to decide if a novel is urgent or not????
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Old 02-11-2016, 09:42 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,078,334 times
Reputation: 27092
Just started the good goodbye rec by younglisa . also am reading the devil in the white city by erik Larson ...
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Old 02-11-2016, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,321,218 times
Reputation: 9858
Yesterday I finished The Mare by Mary Gaitskill. It gets good reviews on Amazon but it didn't do much for me. It was written in first person multiple POV. I would give it a three. The Mare: A Novel: Mary Gaitskill: 9780307379740: Amazon.com: Books


I also read the second book in the Wayward Pines trilogy because it was available on Kindle Unlimited. It was okay for now. My old dog died a couple of weeks ago and it's been a struggle to try and figure out what to do with myself. I also read Rules of Civility and I liked that book very much. And I reread The Secret History and I don't think I liked it all that much the second time.


I am going to start reading the third book in the Wayward Pines trilogy because it is also available via Kindle Unlimited.
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Old 02-11-2016, 03:44 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,546,726 times
Reputation: 14770
I finished listening to "Falling to Pieces" (Shipshewana Amish Mystery #1) by Vannetta Chapman; read by Pam Ward. I left off listening to it in Dec'15 because I didn't like the reader.

I still don't like the reader. It's a nice enough cozy mystery with lots about Amish lifestyles, but probably I won't be rushing to read the rest of the series. I've lived in small towns in my life, and the portrayal of small town life in cozies has never been even close to those I've experienced.

Now onto "Live To Tell" (Detective D.D. Warren #4) by Lisa Gardner, and read by: Ann Marie Lee, Kirsten Potter, and Rebecca Lowman. So far, pretty gruesome. I hope it doesn't continue in this vein.

I feel like Goldilocks, Chapman's too soft, maybe Gardner's too hard.
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Old 02-12-2016, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,387,300 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by i_love_autumn View Post
Already finished Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America's Eyeballs by Gina Keating 5-star read!
Now I know who to blame for the end of VHS and the change to DVD, because they were cheaper to mail!
Really fascinating read about the history/growth of Netflix, from VHS to DVD to today's streaming movies, and how those two brilliant young men were behind those changes.

Now I'm reading ~Lab 257: The Disturbing Story of the Government's Secret Plum Island Germ Laboratory by Michael C. Carroll Based on declassified government documents, in-depth interviews, and access to Plum Island itself, this is an eye-opening, suspenseful account of a federal government germ laboratory gone terribly wrong. For the first time, Lab 257 takes you deep inside this secret world and presents startling revelations on virus outbreaks, biological meltdowns, infected workers, the periodic flushing of contaminated raw sewage into area waters, and the insidious connections between Plum Island, Lyme disease, and the deadly West Nile virus. The book also probes what's in store for Plum Island's new owner, the Department of Homeland Security, in this age of bioterrorism.


Seems like it is mostly nonfiction that gives me the most thrilling reads.
They sound good to me

Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
Just started the good goodbye rec by younglisa . also am reading the devil in the white city by erik Larson ...

Uh oh…I'm on the spot Seriously though I hope you enjoy them. We all don't always agree and that is OK.










I just finished Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon. It is a book about an 18 year old girl who has a disease in which she cannot leave her house. She is allergic to the world. Kind of like "THe Boy in the Bubble" story. As she watches out her bedroom window she sees a new family move in with an 18 year old boy. Of course she falls in love and there are some cute scenes with them but it was kind of meh to me.



Now I am reading two very different books for a religion challenge.

The first one is The Bonobo and the Atheist: In Search of Humanism Among the Primates by Frans de Waal. It is an interesting read by a known primatologist. Through DNA it is known that humans fall between chimps and bonobos. In studying the bonobo he sees morality without religion.(they are more sexually free than us, lol) BTW, he does not bash religion.


The second one is Post-Traumatic Church Syndrome: A Memoir of Humor and Healing by Reba Riley. This is about a young woman who was raised very strict Pentecostal. She had a strong faith but when she was in college she started getting sick whenever she entered the church. Flash forward to age 29. She has been on and off sick and there is no physical reason for it. She decides to find her path back to religion by going to 30 churches by the time she is 30. It's an interesting journey for her. I think it is supposed to be funny but I find her a little immature. I just wish in went into more detail about the religions she visited.
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Old 02-12-2016, 06:43 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,350,226 times
Reputation: 1795
Just finished Salt To The Sea by Ruta Sepetys. I loved it, which is so weird (as we all know) how weird that is when the book is about tragedy. I recommend this book to anyone remotely interested in reading it. Told from 4 points of view, it tells the story of the tragic sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff during WWII, which was the worst maritime disaster in history claiming over 9000 lives.
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Old 02-12-2016, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,319,963 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
Just finished Salt To The Sea by Ruta Sepetys. I loved it, which is so weird (as we all know) how weird that is when the book is about tragedy. I recommend this book to anyone remotely interested in reading it. Told from 4 points of view, it tells the story of the tragic sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff during WWII, which was the worst maritime disaster in history claiming over 9000 lives.

Thank you for mentioning this book, fromupthere. It now lives on my kindle.


I just read about the Wilhelm Gustoff on the web. I had never heard of it. One of the many things I love about this forum is the fact that we all learn so much by reading the posts and then following book leads.


Wouldn't one think that during those history classes we took for 12+ years we would have heard of the "worst maritime disaster" in the history of the world? I don't recall ever hearing the name spoken in any of my history classes. Of course, there is a distinct possibility that I was busy doodling in my notebook and not paying attention to the teacher when that subject was mentioned.
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Old 02-12-2016, 05:15 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,350,226 times
Reputation: 1795
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
Thank you for mentioning this book, fromupthere. It now lives on my kindle.


I just read about the Wilhelm Gustoff on the web. I had never heard of it. One of the many things I love about this forum is the fact that we all learn so much by reading the posts and then following book leads.


Wouldn't one think that during those history classes we took for 12+ years we would have heard of the "worst maritime disaster" in the history of the world? I don't recall ever hearing the name spoken in any of my history classes. Of course, there is a distinct possibility that I was busy doodling in my notebook and not paying attention to the teacher when that subject was mentioned.
I think you were not busy doodling. I think they neglected to teach us about it. I love history and took a couple of history courses in college even and the Wilhelm Gustloff is a completely unknown name to me. Very sad. I'm glad Ruta has felt the need to bring the stories of these tragedies to us.
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