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Old 02-23-2016, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,549 posts, read 30,238,228 times
Reputation: 88940

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I am in the middle of a reading challenge. I just finished:
Speak which is a YA book about a 13 year old girl who hides inside herself after being raped. It tells of her quiet 9th grade year in school as she is shunned by others without her being able to speak up and tell people what happened to her.


Last night I finished Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali which is an amazing story of a very courageous woman. She was raised as a Muslim in Somalia, Saudi Arabia and Kenya. For so many years of struggling with the inequalities and injustices for women in the Islam religion she runs away to Holland as a refugee to avoid an arranged marriage. She becomes a citizen and political figure who fights for women's rights from Muslim worlds. In doing so she has lost her family ties and also stays in hiding for fear for her life.


Next up for me:
The Disappearing Girl about a girl who becomes anorexic

and
Never Let Me Go
"As children, Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy were students at Hailsham, an exclusive boarding school secluded in the English countryside. It was a place of mercurial cliques and mysterious rules where teachers were constantly reminding their charges of how special they were. Now, years later, Kathy is a young woman. Ruth and Tommy have reentered her life, and for the first time she is beginning to look back at their shared past and understand just what it is that makes them special--and how that gift will shape the rest of their time together."
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Old 02-23-2016, 07:53 AM
Status: "World is turned upside down," apologies to British song" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: New York Area
34,237 posts, read 16,401,781 times
Reputation: 29370
I just finished reading The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin by H.W. Brands. I personally thought that the book was excellent. My only slight reservation was its 700+ page length (in the paperback with small print), but then again, he had a long and highly varied life. The book took us, in his life, from Boston to Philadelphia to London, back to America, to Paris and then back home.

The book covered his philandering and less than ideal characteristics as a husband. To its credit it doesn't overdo these faults. While certainly not a hagiography it paints a picture of a vital, pivotal person. I could perhaps have used fewer cheap shots at John Adams. But that's a quibble. Overall one I highly recommend. Please note, the links above are to the "goodreads" site that I and many use to find appropriate reading matter.
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Old 02-23-2016, 11:29 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,786 posts, read 2,757,481 times
Reputation: 4910
Default Missing in action

Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
Devotion by Adam Makos, the story of two pilots in the Korean War, one white and one the US Navy's first carrier qualified pilot. Great story, a bit of perspective on the Korean War which was interesting, and a book I would recommend.
Yah, I was going to say that Pres. Bush - the father - flew off carriers in WWII. The second pilot was the first Black (or Afro-American) US Navy, etc. They were also apparently from opposite ends of society, education, family background, & so on. & it's supposed to be a good story.
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Old 02-23-2016, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Canada
6,615 posts, read 6,469,578 times
Reputation: 18431
I am reading Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Reading this book has opened my eyes to the fact that all Muslims are not equal, men and women, but especially the women. They are on the lowest rung of a very harsh prejudiced society. Prejudism is rampant amongst Muslims and if you are from certain countries or even parts of certain countries, or even from certain families, you are looked down at by other Muslims. They cry prejudism by non-Muslims, yet they are so VERY prejudiced amongst themselves.

This book really makes one wonder why anyone of the Muslim faith would want to come to the western world at all, considering their beliefs that anyone non-Muslim is an infidel. We (the women) are all harlots and prostitutes in their eyes for not covering our skin from our heads, to our fingertips to our toes. To walk around with skin showing is just an open invitation for a man to molest us? The US dollar bill says In God We Trust (I'm assuming that means a Christian God) They want to be in the land of the free yet still feel we are infidels?... why would they want to move to a country so against their religion and government?

I'm not finished this book yet, but the author is amazing in her recall of events, her writing skills and her clarity and knowledge.

Be warned: Some parts of this book is quite graphic about the circumcision of Muslim girls and boys. I was appalled by what I read.
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Old 02-23-2016, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,893 posts, read 18,175,929 times
Reputation: 62765
Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
I am in the middle of a reading challenge. I just finished:
Speak which is a YA book about a 13 year old girl who hides inside herself after being raped. It tells of her quiet 9th grade year in school as she is shunned by others without her being able to speak up and tell people what happened to her.


Last night I finished Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali which is an amazing story of a very courageous woman. She was raised as a Muslim in Somalia, Saudi Arabia and Kenya. For so many years of struggling with the inequalities and injustices for women in the Islam religion she runs away to Holland as a refugee to avoid an arranged marriage. She becomes a citizen and political figure who fights for women's rights from Muslim worlds. In doing so she has lost her family ties and also stays in hiding for fear for her life.


Next up for me:
The Disappearing Girl about a girl who becomes anorexic

and
Never Let Me Go
"As children, Kathy, Ruth, and Tommy were students at Hailsham, an exclusive boarding school secluded in the English countryside. It was a place of mercurial cliques and mysterious rules where teachers were constantly reminding their charges of how special they were. Now, years later, Kathy is a young woman. Ruth and Tommy have reentered her life, and for the first time she is beginning to look back at their shared past and understand just what it is that makes them special--and how that gift will shape the rest of their time together."

I have to put in a plug for "Never Let Me Go." I think you will really like it, Lisa. I have never been disappointed in anything Kazuo Ishiguro has written. His writing has a gentle quality even when the most horrible things are happening. He also beautifully and completely paints the characters in his books. Be ready because this is a tear jerker.
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Old 02-24-2016, 07:58 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,476,031 times
Reputation: 14764
Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
I am reading Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Reading this book has opened my eyes to the fact that all Muslims are not equal, men and women, but especially the women. ... Be warned: Some parts of this book is quite graphic about the circumcision of Muslim girls and boys. I was appalled by what I read.
Yes, reading does have the weight of awakening in it, and with that comes the choice -- to raise your voice against acts of cruelty and oppression, or to shake your head in silence and frown with the knowing. Choose well as these are the choices that define one's humanity.

Best wishes.
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Old 02-24-2016, 02:03 PM
 
496 posts, read 389,304 times
Reputation: 1090
I finished Repent, Lanny Merkel last evening, what a let down from this author after reading and loving Cape Ann: The Novel. It was funny though forcefully funny, she just tried a bit too hard with the comedic tone. I gave it a three as it wasn't terrible just not my style. I do think it could be a fun read at the beach where you are looking for something that is not "deep".

I have You, by Caroline Kepnes on my TR list but I have to wait until it becomes available from the library. I am going to see if the library has Truman by David McCullough available as an e-book so I can read that while waiting for You. If Truman isn't available I have a few new books waiting on y Kindle.
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Old 02-24-2016, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
49,874 posts, read 63,088,205 times
Reputation: 92184
The Invention of Wings, by Sue Monk Kidd. I liked it.
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Old 02-24-2016, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
49,874 posts, read 63,088,205 times
Reputation: 92184
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I have gone from enjoying Fates and Furies to being engrossed in Fates and Furies!


However, the author has this odd little habit of inserting herself into the story every now and then. She drops parentheses into the middle of a paragraph with "outsider's comments". I'm sure there is a literary term for this and I'm not sure what it is, but I call it annoying. I'm not describing this very well so here are a couple of examples:


At last she nodded and bussed her tray and left; and as this was her last night at the residency, he wouldn't see her again (Her death would be soon and sudden. Ski tumble; embolism.)

Thirty and still a nothing. Kills you slowly, failure. As Sallie would have said, he done been bled out. (Perhaps we love him more like this; humbled)


Its like the author is trying to butt in on my reading experience and I don't really need the help or distraction. It would be like enjoying a nice dinner at a restaurant and having the chef lean over your shoulder and say "milk was substituted for the heavy cream".




To be fair, she doesn't do it often - I had to scroll many pages between instances. As distracting as that little quirk is, this is still the best book I've read in a while.
Perhaps she is an "Outsider Author?" You reminded me of a common characteristic of Outsider Artists, which is putting text in their paintings, because they don't trust the viewer to interpret them correctly.
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Old 02-24-2016, 05:51 PM
 
1,026 posts, read 1,185,160 times
Reputation: 1794
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
Has anyone read the widow ? it is a new book out and was just curious if any of you have read it ?
I have it on hold at the library. I am number 64 on the list if that is any indication of its popularity.

I am currently reading Hidden Bodies by Caroline Kepnes. So far, it is excellent.
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