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Old 05-13-2016, 07:42 PM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
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just started The Swans of Fifth Avenue- leaving for vacation tomorrow so I have loaded up the kindle - hopefully i enjoy and finish this one ( from library ebooks) and then have a few to choose from. I will report back
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:45 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
... I feel like if I had a day or a weekend with nothing to do I could easily read it all, probably all in a day but I get distracted so I'd end up having to spread it out over 2 days.
Funny, I am experiencing the same with "Game of Thrones" only in my case all my time is discretionary and I still find other things to do rather than sit and read it. It's been weeks now and I only just this AM reached 63% point. It's a good story well told, but still very easy for me to put down.
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Old 05-14-2016, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
4,040 posts, read 2,907,440 times
Reputation: 38778
I'm reading "Playing for the Ashes" -- Elizabeth George. I love her Inspector Lynley books and thought I'd read them all, but somehow missed this one. So far, it's up to her usual excellent standard -- she's a very skilled writer -- but after 100 or so pages, the investigation has not yet commenced.


I'm also reading my way through the Maisie Dobbs (Jacqueline Winspear) books in order but have taken a break after "Among the Mad". She creates such real characters and paints a complete picture of some segment of British life in each book so I'm truly loving her books and will be sad when I'm done.
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Old 05-15-2016, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
Reputation: 3809
I just finished Kill 'Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul by James McBride. McBride's book is a revealing and well written biography (unusual style) about a very complex man, the Godfather of Soul. Even though I liked an appreciate Brown's music, I knew little about the man. I read McBride's, The Good Lord Bird, a few years ago, loved his writing and the story. Brown valued education above all having grown up with little formal education himself. He left most of his fortune to educate them. What happened in this instance left me feeling quite angry. Once I started this book, I could not put it down. You do not have to be a lover of Brown's music to appreciate his compelling life story told in a very different style by McBride.
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Old 05-15-2016, 08:54 PM
 
28,895 posts, read 54,141,122 times
Reputation: 46680
Down South, by Paul Theroux. It's been disappointing, I have to say. He wallows in lazy stereotype and makes the same points over and over again. Yet, despite spending a year in the South, it's a remarkably shallow and superficial. Disappointing.
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Old 05-16-2016, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
I read about five pages of Everyone Brave is Forgiven (by Chris Cleave) and called it done. It seemed ridiculous.
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Old 05-16-2016, 08:38 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
I just finished Kill 'Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul by James McBride. McBride's book is a revealing and well written biography (unusual style) about a very complex man, the Godfather of Soul. Even though I liked an appreciate Brown's music, I knew little about the man. I read McBride's, The Good Lord Bird, a few years ago, loved his writing and the story. Brown valued education above all having grown up with little formal education himself. He left most of his fortune to educate them. What happened in this instance left me feeling quite angry. Once I started this book, I could not put it down. You do not have to be a lover of Brown's music to appreciate his compelling life story told in a very different style by McBride.
I just put both of those on my TBR list. I loved The Color of Water by James McBride.

I'm enjoying The Wolf's Hour by Robert McCammon quite a bit. It's a little on the overwrought side with a lot of grisly descriptions of the werewolf "lifestyle" but it reads like an action movie and the writing is solid. I'm happy that I ventured out of my reading comfort zone.
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Old 05-16-2016, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,299 posts, read 8,253,049 times
Reputation: 3809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marlow View Post
I just put both of those on my TBR list. I loved The Color of Water by James McBride.

I'm enjoying The Wolf's Hour by Robert McCammon quite a bit. It's a little on the overwrought side with a lot of grisly descriptions of the werewolf "lifestyle" but it reads like an action movie and the writing is solid. I'm happy that I ventured out of my reading comfort zone.
I'm reading The Color of Water now.
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Old 05-16-2016, 09:01 AM
 
496 posts, read 395,417 times
Reputation: 1090
I finished Unintended Consequences. The writing was very stilted and just not engrossing, though as the story moved along it held my interest and ended up being somewhat enjoyable though I doubt if I will read anything else by this author.

I finished The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman and was utterly fascinated by it. It's actually fantasy which is a genre I don't normally read. I enjoyed this book so much that I read Coraline also by NG. I didn't enjoy that book as much because it was more suited for older children though I think it would scare the daylights out of my DGs so not a book that I would want to read with them when they stay with me.

I started a collection of short stories by Daphne du Maurier. The Birds was great, the Alfred Hitchcock adaptation is well known and I've seen it several times but I still enjoyed the story more than the film adaptation. Mount Veritas, I didn't enjoy at all and felt like I had wasted my time. The Apple Tree, I just finished and loved it! Now onto The Little Photographer. I don't usually like short stories but I am enjoying this collection very much.

https://www.amazon.com/Birds-Stories...=sr_1_8&sr=8-8
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Old 05-16-2016, 09:17 AM
 
294 posts, read 337,148 times
Reputation: 437
I was reading the Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up until I decided that time is better off spent getting rid of stuff
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