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Old 03-10-2017, 08:29 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,530 posts, read 20,114,067 times
Reputation: 10539

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Thanks for the reply. To be honest my main reading motivation is reading, and as I read I deconstruct, hoping to reach a point where I construct my own novel. Available soon on Amazon for 99 cents (along with thousands of others).

I'm a bit busy to read about narcotrafficantes although I am well aware of how drugs are destroying many of our fellow US citizens.

I just find it hard to blame the users for the trafficking. If left to me traffickers would be executed on the spot. Instant lead poisoning, and I'm including all but the smallest dealers.

I'd send the users into diversion/treatment programs, those who survive.
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Old 03-11-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post

But I'm reading Radix now and it is so far blowing me away at around the 25% mark. I'm not sure how I came across it but it is available on Kindle Unlimited as was The Hangman's Daughter. There are some formatting problems, mostly with indentation of paragraphs. It is book 1 in a series, which is great if I end up loving the book all the way through. Right now it appears to have great character development and nice use of language. https://www.amazon.com/Radix-Book-1-...keywords=Radix
Radix is an amazing book but I stopped reading at 75%. It falls somewhere between fantasy and science fiction as it is set so far in the future. The author is an amazing writer and I have never come across so many words I didn't know. He writes like a poet and it's brilliant. There is just too much of it. I have no idea what is going on. I don't know if I will finish it. It is very dense.

So I am now reading The Book of the Unnamed Midwife. At the 26% mark, I am liking it a lot. And Ketabcha, it has your name written all over it. It reminds me of that post-apocalyptic book set in the PNW that you liked so much. https://www.amazon.com/Book-Unnamed-...nnamed+midwife It's available on Kindle Unlimited.
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Old 03-11-2017, 02:43 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,798,355 times
Reputation: 4925
Default I feel like a spinning top or a dreidel

Empire games / Charles Stross, c2016, Tom Doherty.


Subjects
  • Time travel -- Fiction.
  • Espionage -- .
Summary
  • "The year is 2020. It's seventeen years since the Revolution overthrew the last king of the New British Empire, and the newly reconstituted North American Commonwealth is developing rapidly, on course to defeat the French and bring democracy to a troubled world. But Miriam Burgeson, commissioner in charge of the shadowy Ministry of Intertemporal Research and Intelligence--the paratime espionage agency tasked with catalyzing the Commonwealth's great leap forward--has a problem. For years, she's warned everyone: "The Americans are coming." Now their drones arrive in the middle of a succession crisis--the leader of the American Commonwealth is dying and the vultures are circling. In another timeline, the U.S. has recruited Rita, Miriam's estranged daughter, to spy across timelines and bring down any remaining world-walkers who might threaten national security. But her handlers are keeping information from her. Two nuclear superpowers are set on a collision course. Two increasingly desperate paratime espionage agencies are fumbling around in the dark, trying to find a solution to the firs- contact problem that doesn't result in a nuclear holocaust. And two women--a mother and her long-lost, adopted daughter--are about to find themselves on opposite sides of the confrontation"-- Provided by publisher.
Series
  • Empire games ; 1
Length
  • 331 pages ;
Stross has won a lot of awards. He's very inventive, & this is the start of a new series - across the multiverse, agents & warfare - economic & military. Plausible military & political & technology. A whirlwind read.
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Old 03-11-2017, 06:47 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,530 posts, read 20,114,067 times
Reputation: 10539
Wow SW88 that is just a blow me away review! In an earlier post I expressed my desire/hope to move to more informative posts and you sure hit the mark!

You make me want to read the book and I'll certainly sniff it out!

It reminds me of the famous alternate history SF author Harry Turtledove.

---------

It reminds me of a book or series I read set about 2060 where time travel had been invented and they were using it for research until they discovered an observer effect that was changing the timelines! The most fascinating part I enjoyed the most was the parts of the book set in WW II wartime London, and the time traveler trapped there. I may be able to come up with the title/author in a future-post. I never enjoyed historical fiction until I read this novel.

---------

And I finished Anne Bishop's 5th outing in her The Others series and it was simply amazing! And I'm happy to say that while the novel resolved the principal issues it brought up, there was plenty of room to make it a sure bet there will be another sequel. Although if the series ends here that would not be a problem, but I doubt the author's fans will not get another Others fix in a year or so! -- Again, if my recommendation intrigued you, begin with the series opener and read in order of publishing date. Each successive sequel depends on events in the sequels before them. -- Just FYI this is in the genre urban fantasy.

It appears that I will become the forums urban fantasy advocate!

Just remember what I said. SF has burned out for me. We've done all the things predicted by SF, e.g. landing on the moon. For me SF is dead, the new SF is speculative SF.

Urban fantasy is almost the same as speculative SF except that speculative SF still has to adhere to plausible future science. Urban fantasy throws science out the window. UF novels still have to be built on self-consistent worlds, e.g. vampires, werewolves, witches, fae, elves, and many other supernatural creatures, and often/usually magic (which has a "science" of its own), and as I said urban indicates the novel is set in the present day and technology (as opposed to medieval fantasy e.g. Game of Thrones).

But remember the hard rule of ALL novels: the author must create an atmosphere of suspension of disbelief. This is one of the few fiction rules where I can see no exceptions. If you can't suspend your disbelief at least long enough to enjoy the novel, then you call that a parody.
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Old 03-11-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: SoCal
14,530 posts, read 20,114,067 times
Reputation: 10539
Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88 View Post
Empire games / Charles Stross, c2016, Tom Doherty.
I've placed hods and recommendations (buy this!) at 4 libraries after reading your review!
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Old 03-12-2017, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
If you mean Chasing The Scream about the war on drugs, I read it not that long ago and absolutely loved it. I was talking about it during my book club and everyone decided they wanted to read it, so we did and everyone thought it was fantastic. It's such a great book for re-thinking how we treat drugs and how much harm the U.S. has inflicted on the world.

Yes that is the book. I will read it but just had to set it aside for a bit

I loved Born a Crime, although I wish it talked more about how he ended up in the U.S. and got The Daily Show. He has some fantastic ruminations on race, and really gave me even more respect for him. I had both the hardback and the audio version, and the audio is particularly great because he reads it himself. (I'm new to audiobooks, and got audible for my son. I gave this one a try, since I also had the hardback, and was surprised at how much I liked the audio version.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
Yes, thanks to cloven for recommending Trevor Noah's memoir. I read it in two sittings. The book is well written, not lengthy, and I learned much about apartheid.
Trevor was on CNN recently and compared his experience of the division created by the British overlords to the situation we have in the U.S. today.
I read Trevor moved to L.A. soon after the incident with his mother. His stepfather threatened to kill him. He first appeared on David Letterman's show in 2011. He had such an amazing extensive career in South Africa, Stewart may have heard of him. Certainly, after he appeared on Letterman.
I finished Born a Crime and loved the book.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holly-Kay View Post
I just finished A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline, and as someone else mentioned, I was blown away by it. Each time I had to leave it I couldn't wait to get back to the story. CBK, is a wonderful author and did extensive research on Andrew Wyeth and Christina Olson.

I read Orphan Train a few years ago and enjoyed that one immensely as well. My next book will be another one by CBK, I'm just not sure which one it will be but thank you to the person who originally recommended A Piece of the World.
Thanks for that I will add it to my list


I started a book last night on the recommendation from a friend on GR. For me she is usually pretty trustworthy. The book is Corrag by Susan Fletcher. I am going to borrow this review, https://www.goodreads.com/review/sho..._review_page=1

"There is a stillness and beauty to Susan Fletcher's writing that will enchant the reader and take your breath away with beautiful vivid descriptions of the Scottish Highlands and a tale that will transport you to another time and place. Prepare to be bewitched

Corrag is the story of a young woman who has witnessed the horrific massacare of Glencoe on a winters dawn in 1692, where William IIIs redcoats brutally slaughtered 32 of the McDonald's Men Women and Children Clan. The reason for the massacre was their loyalty to the exiled Catholic James II, however sadly for the McDonalds a signed oath of their allegiance to William the III has been signed six days too late and the punishment is devastating.

The story is passionately and beautifully told by Corrag (who has been branded a witch and imprissioned ) to the visiting Irish Political Activist Charles Leslie who is secretely gathering evidence against King William of Orange.
The novel is full of lyrical and poetic prose and the descriptions of Scottish Highlands will have you think you are right there among the mountains and glens and smelling the heather and herbs.
Corrag herself is a wonderful free spirited character who dwells in her world without Kings and religion to answer to and she lives her life doing good and carrying on the traditions of her mother and those that have gone before her."


It sounds very good to me
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Old 03-12-2017, 06:38 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,665 posts, read 5,844,099 times
Reputation: 5201
I just finished the hilarious ~Dave Barry's Complete Guide to Guys by Dave Barry
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true


and I highly recommend it to every female from 16 on up. I am recommending it to my teen granddaughter in the hopes that she will never have unrealistic notions about "Mr. Right"!


and now I am reading~All the Shah's Men by Stephen Kinzer
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...the_Shah_s_Men which is excellent! I discovered it through ylisa7.


Also reading a romance by the author known as "the queen of kissing" because she writes clean romance with knee-weakening kisses, because she believes it's all in the kisses.
One Classic Latin Lover, Please by Marcia Lynn McClure
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true
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Old 03-12-2017, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Well, despite the fact that I have a ton of stuff to do, I got none of it done this weekend. Instead, I got sick. I've been at home, under the covers, sniffling...and napping...and reading.

I finished The Zero and the One by Ryan Ruby. I loved it up until, I'm not sure exactly, but I'd guesstimate until the last 15% or so. It got far-fetched and I'm not one to easily suspend my disbelief. I've said this many times before: I like a novel that tells a story of something that *could really* happen in real life. Could the last 15% happen in real life? I suppose, but not in the kind of life that *I* know. It's very well-written, I'll give it that, but I was disappointed in those last few chapters.

It's time for an Advil Cold & Sinus dose. And a nap.
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Old 03-12-2017, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
3,565 posts, read 2,114,813 times
Reputation: 4384
The Essential Dykes to Watch Out For by Alison Bechdel

I fancy something light, fluffy and extremely funny this weekend. And so I dug out this old book and haven't laughed so much in ages!
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Old 03-12-2017, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Well, despite the fact that I have a ton of stuff to do, I got none of it done this weekend. Instead, I got sick. I've been at home, under the covers, sniffling...and napping...and reading.

I finished The Zero and the One by Ryan Ruby. I loved it up until, I'm not sure exactly, but I'd guesstimate until the last 15% or so. It got far-fetched and I'm not one to easily suspend my disbelief. I've said this many times before: I like a novel that tells a story of something that *could really* happen in real life. Could the last 15% happen in real life? I suppose, but not in the kind of life that *I* know. It's very well-written, I'll give it that, but I was disappointed in those last few chapters.

It's time for an Advil Cold & Sinus dose. And a nap.
You caught my cold.
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