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Old 03-27-2017, 04:44 AM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
3,831 posts, read 1,781,593 times
Reputation: 5005

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The Paris Wife was only fair, interesting but not the type of book I would ever want to read again.

Just borrowed: Lilac Girls a historical fiction about world war II.
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Old 03-27-2017, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wintergirl80 View Post
The Paris Wife was only fair, interesting but not the type of book I would ever want to read again.

Just borrowed: Lilac Girls a historical fiction about world war II.

I liked The Lilac Girls. Enjoy.



I'm half way through a Gentleman in Moscow. It was a slow start for me and then Nina. I love her character. I went back to see who read this and I saw the conversations about the ellipses. Until then I was just ignoring them now they are like a red flag
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Old 03-27-2017, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylisa7 View Post
I liked The Lilac Girls. Enjoy.



I'm half way through a Gentleman in Moscow. It was a slow start for me and then Nina. I love her character. I went back to see who read this and I saw the conversations about the ellipses. Until then I was just ignoring them now they are like a red flag
Hahaha!!!

Okay, in all fairness, I'm an editor so things like ellipses make me crazy... [see what I did there? ] and are *supposed to* make me crazy. If it's in dialogue, it's all good -- it's to indicate a pause. But in the narrative? It's odd. It indicates laziness, as if the author couldn't be bothered to finish the sentence. It made me mental. HOWEVER, I loved the book! I like this author very much, and I'm guessing that there was a reason for the ellipses, even though I could never solve that riddle. Please keep reading it. And if you haven't read his Rules of Civility, oh my god, make that your next book. I read it a long time ago but, if I'm remembering correctly, I liked it even more than A Gentleman in Moscow.
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Old 03-27-2017, 07:28 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylisa7 View Post
I'm half way through a Gentleman in Moscow. It was a slow start for me and then Nina. I love her character. I went back to see who read this and I saw the conversations about the ellipses. Until then I was just ignoring them now they are like a red flag
I'm curious - are you reading a Gentleman in Moscow on an e-reader or paper? I promise that I'm going to re-read this one as a paper book because I'm convinced that I would appreciate it more if I could flip around and double check characters. The author masterfully weaves characters through time and I had a difficult time keeping up and catching/confirming all of the fore-shadowing.
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Old 03-27-2017, 08:18 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
I'm trying to read Home Before Morning by Lynda Van Devanter. I say "trying," because it's going to be a tough read without a happy ending. It'a a memoir by a woman who served as a nurse for a year during the Vietnam war. It was recommended on here a long time ago and I'm interested in the subject matter, but I'm still not sure how far I'll get.

https://www.amazon.com/Home-before-M.../dp/1558492984
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Old 03-27-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,798,355 times
Reputation: 4925
Default & far more than a whiff of the old ultra-violence

Ancestor : a novel / Scott Sigler, c2010, Crown Publishers.


Subjects
  • Geneticists -- Fiction.
  • Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc. -- Fiction.
  • Xenografts -- Fiction.
  • Transgenic organisms -- Fiction.
  • Horror tales.
Summary
  • On a remote island in the Canadian Arctic, PJ Colding leads a group of geneticists who have discovered the holy grail of medicine--a computer-engineered living creature whose organs can be implanted in any person, with no chance of transplant rejection. There's just one problem: these "ancestors" are not docile.
Length
  • 425 pages ;
A genetic/techno-thriller, a wild ride through the outliers of genegineering (& a relatively painless primer on early cell development). This novel is a slam-dunk movie, just waiting to be made. Sex (on & off the microscope), mad scientists, death, violence, conspiracies, lost love - I can see the credits rolling now.
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Old 03-27-2017, 08:02 PM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,720,406 times
Reputation: 6482
Just finished Moonglow. Liked and enjoyed it but didn't love it like so many others have. Oh, what to read next. I have a dozen sitting here in my bed. Want to read The Nix, but I prefer to alternate fiction with nonfiction, and due to book clubs, I just read two novels. (I also worry about reading a novel or anything too close to the novel we're discussing if I finish a book before the book club meets -- I don't want to get the discussion book confused with the book I'm reading now. I might go with either The Making of Donald Trump, or Venomous - How Earth's Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry.
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Old 03-27-2017, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Just finished Moonglow. Liked and enjoyed it but didn't love it like so many others have.
I didn't read much of Moonglow. I got, I don't know, bored? Tired of the style? Something. And it was quite early on, I think it was in the first quarter, that I threw in the towel. Were the last three quarters like the first or did it get better?
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Old 03-28-2017, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Only 40 more pages to go


Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Hahaha!!!

Okay, in all fairness, I'm an editor so things like ellipses make me crazy... [see what I did there? ] and are *supposed to* make me crazy. If it's in dialogue, it's all good -- it's to indicate a pause. But in the narrative? It's odd. It indicates laziness, as if the author couldn't be bothered to finish the sentence. It made me mental. HOWEVER, I loved the book! I like this author very much, and I'm guessing that there was a reason for the ellipses, even though I could never solve that riddle. Please keep reading it. And if you haven't read his Rules of Civility, oh my god, make that your next book. I read it a long time ago but, if I'm remembering correctly, I liked it even more than A Gentleman in Moscow.
I tend to use ellipses a lot on CD I added Rules of Civility to my list


Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I'm curious - are you reading a Gentleman in Moscow on an e-reader or paper? I promise that I'm going to re-read this one as a paper book because I'm convinced that I would appreciate it more if I could flip around and double check characters. The author masterfully weaves characters through time and I had a difficult time keeping up and catching/confirming all of the fore-shadowing.
Yes I am reading the paper version and in this case I think it is a good idea. I like to be able to flip back and even take notes sometimes. Because they are Russian names it is hard for me to remember them all. Try it again in the paper version. It is a good one.
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Old 03-28-2017, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,344 posts, read 63,928,555 times
Reputation: 93287
Just finished The Weekenders, by Mary Kay Andrews. Good summer beach reading. She has a bunch of books, so it will keep me busy for awhile.
Her books are a lot like Dorothea Benton Franks'. Set in the low country, main character gets dumped by cad husband, everyone has plenty of money, and of course, granny left her the crumbling, but charming beach house, and the handyman is very muscular, lol.
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