Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 05-26-2017, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,340 posts, read 63,918,476 times
Reputation: 93266

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by pinetreelover View Post
I recently picked up a 1960 copy of Emily Post at a used book store.

Our family is having a blast reading from it at dinner. Someone calls out a page and someone else reads their favorite etiquette advice from that page.

Emily was very, very judgy....

"That older or fat women should choose bathing suits that are ample enough to be becoming cannot be too strongly advised"
These, of course, are words to live by. In modern terms, the definition of insanity is to buy a bathing suit every year and expect to look better in this year's, than you did in last year's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-26-2017, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,867,486 times
Reputation: 101073
Ok I've been on vacation but I did finish reading The Girls and LOVED it. Thanks for the suggestion, folks! I don't usually read much fiction so it was a pleasant surprise.

I am now reading The Lost Tudor Princess - Lady Margaret Douglas by Alison Weir, who is one of my favorite authors. She is very thorough in her research but she breathes life into historical events and people. She really knows her Tudor history, too, and since that's one of my favorite eras I always enjoy her books.

I have Tortilla Curtain coming next - I couldn't help but read a bit of it and it seems really good. But I'm going to knock this other one out first.

I also just got in Chasing the Scream since I'm on a heroin kick (figuratively, not literally). I was fascinated by Dreamland and lo and behold, my husband is reading it now and can hardly put it down. Read these with a side of "Trainspotting" and you'll be looking sideways at everyone you meet who's skinny and pale! (Trainspotting 2 is out now and I can't wait to watch it but that's another genre!) Chasing the Scream is third on my list.

Also just recently finished The Boy Kings of Texas and it was really, really surprisingly good. I was a bit put off by it at first because it was really dark in the beginning but I ended up liking it a lot.

On vacation I found two really cool very old books - well, one is older than the other but they are both cool. Both hardbacks. The first is a late 1800s edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Not a first edition but a very old one. It's in very good shape. The second is a 1961 hardback edition of Winnie the Pooh. This was probably the edition I grew up reading, and looking through all the old illustrations made my heart very warm. Honestly, this book is charming. I haven't read Uncle Tom's Cabin since I was about 12 so I do want to reread it but that's for another day. Still, I only paid about $10 for the UTC book and $3 for the Pooh book so I feel good about those bargains!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,383,288 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromupthere View Post
This is my next after my next. Next is Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout after I finish The Forgotten Girls by Sara Blaedel, which is a Danish book. Before that I read All The Missing Girls by Megan Miranda and I See You by Claire Mackintosh.
Like me you have a lot of books going


Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerlily View Post
fromupthere and ylisa we are in sync right now. I’ve had little time to read, but I did finish I See You and Anything is Possible. I just started Beartown a few days ago. Only about 3% in, but so far it’s interesting. Strout’s book was probably not a good choice after The Sympathizer. Dawn was right about Strout's short sentences, but further into the book she alternated between the short sentences and wonderful descriptive ones. I was trying to figure out whether she used difference sentence structures for different characters.
I will finish Beartown today. I know something bad is coming and it's kind of sad because I really like most of the characters.



Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Ok I've been on vacation but I did finish reading The Girls and LOVED it. Thanks for the suggestion, folks! I don't usually read much fiction so it was a pleasant surprise.


I have Tortilla Curtain coming next - I couldn't help but read a bit of it and it seems really good. But I'm going to knock this other one out first.

I also just got in Chasing the Scream since I'm on a heroin kick (figuratively, not literally). I was fascinated by Dreamland and lo and behold, my husband is reading it now and can hardly put it down. Read these with a side of "Trainspotting" and you'll be looking sideways at everyone you meet who's skinny and pale! (Trainspotting 2 is out now and I can't wait to watch it but that's another genre!) Chasing the Scream is third on my list.

On vacation I found two really cool very old books - well, one is older than the other but they are both cool. Both hardbacks. The first is a late 1800s edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Not a first edition but a very old one. It's in very good shape. The second is a 1961 hardback edition of Winnie the Pooh. This was probably the edition I grew up reading, and looking through all the old illustrations made my heart very warm. Honestly, this book is charming. I haven't read Uncle Tom's Cabin since I was about 12 so I do want to reread it but that's for another day. Still, I only paid about $10 for the UTC book and $3 for the Pooh book so I feel good about those bargains!
I still need to read The Girls. One of these days I'll get to it.



I read the Tortilla Curtain and it was pretty good. It gave a quick but one dimensional view of the extremes I thought. Here is one review that I agree with "In the world of the tortilla curtain, being a liberal means that you recycle. In the world of the tortilla curtain, being hispanic means you are either unbelievably downtrodden and unlucky or you're carrying a knife and willing to use it."

I found the white neighborhood people to be pretty disgusting people. Anyway....see what you think.



Chasing The Scream was very good....and the war on drugs is a farce. It also shows that most people do not become addicts just because they have access to or take the drug. To me it seems that people who get addicted have some type of deficiency in their lives or with themselves. It's sad that the people who really "need" the drugs for pain can't get them.


Great deal on your books. I really need to read Twelve Years A Slave. Another one that has been on my list forever.





BTW....For anyone interested in a very good series that takes people into lives of our opposites check out 30 Days: The Complete Series Morgan Spurlock t is very interesting. It's sad that it was discontinued. https://www.amazon.com/30-Days-Compl.../dp/B0038P1CXI







On a lighter note I will be reading Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops (Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops #1) by Jen Campbell.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true


and
Naked at Lunch: A Reluctant Nudist's Adventures in the Clothing-Optional World by Mark Haskell Smith which looked amusing to me.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,867,486 times
Reputation: 101073
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylisa7 View Post
Like me you have a lot of books going

Quote:
I still need to read The Girls. One of these days I'll get to it.
It was an easy read but I liked the style, and the topic is pretty fascinating.

Quote:
I read the Tortilla Curtain and it was pretty good. It gave a quick but one dimensional view of the extremes I thought. Here is one review that I agree with "In the world of the tortilla curtain, being a liberal means that you recycle. In the world of the tortilla curtain, being hispanic means you are either unbelievably downtrodden and unlucky or you're carrying a knife and willing to use it."

I found the white neighborhood people to be pretty disgusting people. Anyway....see what you think.
Well, if it's one dimensional or trite, I'll chuck it pretty fast and won't finish reading it. Living in Texas, I see a LOT of variables between the non Hispanic and Hispanic folks, Hispanics in general, white folks in general, etc. It's not cut and dried, which is why so many Texans are opposed to the very idea of a "wall" along our border with Mexico.
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/immi...ants-help-hurt

But I don't think these issues are one dimensional anywhere. It's just that they are more "in our face" in some regions of the country than others.

Quote:
Chasing The Scream was very good....and the war on drugs is a farce. It also shows that most people do not become addicts just because they have access to or take the drug. To me it seems that people who get addicted have some type of deficiency in their lives or with themselves. It's sad that the people who really "need" the drugs for pain can't get them.
I agree. I have taken Vicodin several times over the years because I've had three surgeries and subsequent pain the week or so afterwards. The first surgery it was a piece of cake to get (and I ended up with leftovers, which I eventually threw away). Second surgery they gave me two weeks' worth and once again I had some left over. Third surgery (three years ago) they would only give me 4 days' worth, and I had to call and jump through hoops to get the remaining prescription, even though it was a prescription from the doctor for two weeks of Vicodin. The whole process made me feel like a freaking criminal when I was actually in significant pain - and once again, ended up with Vicodin left over. But this time I locked it in our safe in case we ever need to use it and can't get it. Because, like, I don't know how to buy drugs from a dealer.

Quote:
On a lighter note I will be reading Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops (Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops #1) by Jen Campbell.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true


and
Naked at Lunch: A Reluctant Nudist's Adventures in the Clothing-Optional World by Mark Haskell Smith which looked amusing to me.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true
Those sound fun! Have you read **** My Dad Says? Oh my gosh, I was cracking up out loud reading it on an airplane - it actually got sort of embarrassing.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-t-my-dad-says
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,383,288 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post

Well, if it's one dimensional or trite, I'll chuck it pretty fast and won't finish reading it. Living in Texas, I see a LOT of variables between the non Hispanic and Hispanic folks, Hispanics in general, white folks in general, etc. It's not cut and dried, which is why so many Texans are opposed to the very idea of a "wall" along our border with Mexico.
https://www.dallasnews.com/news/immi...ants-help-hurt

It's not that is is bad but it should have been much better. Here is a quote from the book. This is the white man from the influential neighborhood. He says this when he hits the Hispanic man with his car after the man starts talking. "He said something in a foreign language. It wasn't French he was speaking, that was for sure. And it wasn't Norwegian....really?? duh...there are Hispanics all over the area this man lives in. Like you don't know this.

I don't know maybe that was supposed to be humor in the book. To me it made that character, Delaney, look like a moron.



and on that note I would like to read some better books about immigration in the 2000's.




But I don't think these issues are one dimensional anywhere. It's just that they are more "in our face" in some regions of the country than others.

No they are not.



Those sound fun! Have you read **** My Dad Says? Oh my gosh, I was cracking up out loud reading it on an airplane - it actually got sort of embarrassing.
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-t-my-dad-says


My SO hurt his back really bad last year and he went through the same thing. It was terrible trying to get him anything to make him more comfortable. We have pain killers that are 5 years old, lol. They won't be as potent but in a jam they may save us until we can get help.


Thanks for the new book to add.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,383,288 times
Reputation: 88950
BTW, I finished Beartown and loved it. I thought it was great how the author gave a glimpse of the futures in the book. I can see a second book coming out...I hope.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,399 posts, read 1,249,767 times
Reputation: 3052
Finished The Octagonal Raven by L. E. Modesitt, Jr., and while I enjoyed the read, I don't think it's one of the author's best works.

Back to Terry Prachett's Discworld with Thud!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,513 posts, read 6,374,142 times
Reputation: 7627
I'm about 2/3 of the way through Dark Money by Jane Mayer.

I knew that since the Citizens United decision about money equaling free speech and what that meant to campaign contributions was significant but this book shows just how incredible and corrupting it truly is.

The huge amounts of money that billionaires spend by setting up "non-profit" think tanks and foundations to push for more and more tax cuts for themselves by lowering capital gains rate, eliminating the estate tax, etc is just sickening. The lengths they will go to in an effort to smear any politician who they want to get rid of or to prevent someone from winning an office is just insane. They do this at the federal, state and even the local levels. Many of them claim to be Libertarians and are vehemently against any government except some defense spending, claiming that all taxes are stealing their property and their freedom.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2017, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,867,486 times
Reputation: 101073
Well, big change of book plans here. I couldn't really get into the Alison Weir book about the "lost Tudor princess" - I think I've overdone the whole Tudor thing and I'm getting fatigued reading about all the same intrigues. I love her writing style but my head just isn't in it.

So I had barely started on Chasing the Scream, and it's very good, but THEN - today a book my daughter swore she couldn't put down came in and WOW, I started reading it with the intention of just checking it out - and I can't put it down. Here it is - Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset, Tiina Nunnally (Translator):

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/..._Lavransdatter

I don't know how I got this far in life without ever hearing about this book before! And it merges really nicely with my love of the Vikings miniseries and Viking history in general. I mean, this is set after the Viking era but still - there's a continuation there that I can easily follow.

Quote:
In her great historical epic Kristin Lavransdatter, set in fourteenth-century Norway, Nobel laureate Sigrid Undset tells the life story of one passionate and headstrong woman. Painting a richly detailed backdrop, Undset immerses readers in the day-to-day life, social conventions, and political and religious undercurrents of the period. Now in one volume, Tiina Nunnally's award-winning definitive translation brings this remarkable work to life with clarity and lyrical beauty.
As a young girl, Kristin is deeply devoted to her father, a kind and courageous man. But when as a student in a convent school she meets the charming and impetuous Erlend Nikulaussøn, she defies her parents in pursuit of her own desires. Her saga continues through her marriage to Erlend, their tumultuous life together raising seven sons as Erlend seeks to strengthen his political influence, and finally their estrangement as the world around them tumbles into uncertainty.

With its captivating heroine and emotional potency, Kristin Lavransdatter is the masterwork of Norway's most beloved author, one of the twentieth century's most prodigious and engaged literary minds and, in Nunnally's exquisite translation, a story that continues to enthrall.
I guess I hadn't heard of it because maybe it wasn't translated into English for a pretty long time? But I think it's been translated into English for at least 15 years now so maybe I'm the only person in the US who hasn't heard of it till now.

Anyway, it's beautifully written. The translator has won several prestigious awards for her excellent translation of this beloved Norwegian trilogy from the original language into English.

Warning - it's 1168 pages long.

This could take me awhile. Or I could toss it aside in frustration or boredom in a few days, who knows? We'll see!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-28-2017, 03:14 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,383,288 times
Reputation: 88950
Kathryn- Here is one I have out from my library now. It is an epic Scandinavian adventure that spans 200 years. We, the Drowned by Carsten Jensen, Charlotte Barslund. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...om_search=true
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top