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Old 09-03-2017, 08:55 AM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
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I have finished THE GIVER -- it held my interest and was so well written but the ending really bumped it down a few notches for me. (I find this happens a lot with me where I find endings disappointing. In this case it was more confusion).
I just thought I got the Snowflower book on kindle from the library but apparently I got China Dolls (same author Lisa See). I will give it a whirl and see if it holds me.

I also will be picking Tuesday Nights in 1980 which my book club is reading. Not sure if that one will get me either. I might be better off looking over what I have on the kindle as there's likely something that will capture me. (I try to save those for vacation or when I really want to read and have nothing available.)
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:29 AM
 
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I recently finished reading Picoult's "Second Glance" and gave it a high Goodreads rating, but I don't think it would be for everybody. Still, I would recommend it if one's tastes included the supernatural. Her handling of Eugenics (here in the 30s until Hitler started taking it to an even darker realm) and comparing it to today's genetic engineering was provoking. I like reading this author for the same reason I liked Maeve Binchy: both cared about their characters and treated them humanly.

And speaking of humane authors, this morning I finished listening to Wendell Berry's "Remembering" -- another provoking story. I've read quite a few of his Port William KY novels, all set around a number of farming families and their friends, in a time when people lived on their farms and were neighborly. I don't know if this was the last of his works covering that topic, but it was a distinct departure, literally. If I still had tears in me, I might've cried at this one.

I TRIED to read a couple of different graphic novels: "The Lost Boy" by Greg Ruth, and Neil Gaiman's first volume of "The Sandman." I put both down after flipping through about ten pages in each. The former was supposed to be adult reading, but appeared to be targeted to a ten year old audience. The latter was -- well, disgusting. I have to seriously reconsider my thoughts about Gaiman after seeing it.

I am trying graphic novels as part of a library reading challenge, so in that spirit I reserved three more by different authors, and hope to have something nice to say in the future.

What's next? I have no clue.
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:50 AM
 
1,251 posts, read 1,077,396 times
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The Child by Fiona Barton...halfway finished and really enjoying it! Next up is News of the World by Paulette Jiles.
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Old 09-03-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
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I finished The Burning Girl. Thank god THAT'S over! Don't ask me why I kept reading; I just did. I skimmed a lot, though. The story was thin and was completely based on conjecture at every turn: "maybe this happened," "maybe that happened," "may she was thinking..." Obviously, your mileage may vary but, according to my mileage, I don't recommend this book.
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Old 09-03-2017, 04:35 PM
 
6,467 posts, read 8,183,718 times
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Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz.
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Old 09-04-2017, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
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I'm reading The Bright Hour: A Memoir of Living and Dying by Nina Riggs. I got it from the library but it's "on special" for $1.99 right now on Amazon. The first review (linked here) on Amazon is by her husband.

So far it's "good," which really isn't the right word for this type of book, but you know what I mean. It's not quite linear -- it's snippets -- but you still get the feeling of a story unfolding.
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Old 09-04-2017, 04:58 PM
 
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While sewing this morning, I listened to the theatrical audio production of "An Enemy of the People" by Henrik Ibsen. It was a portrayal of the community response to a doctor's scientific discovery of a public threat in the community's primary economic interest. In less than two hours, Ibsen was able to convey the timeless conflict between economic interests (greed) and truth. Given the atmosphere of present day climate change deniers and alternative truths, I thought it was a timely read/listen.

"The strong man is always alone."

Before that, I tried to listen to "Coldheart Canyon" by Clive Barker but was so repelled to the content that I had to turn it off. Gratuitous obscenity most foul. I don't see how those that rated it highly, let alone actually read it could stomach it. Apparently we have more jaded readers than I would've suspected.

These last two years have been a perpetual revelation to me of how I have over-estimated my fellow humans.

While waiting for my next library reservation to come available (Baldacci's "The Fix") I am occasionally picking up Jeanette Wells' "The Glass Castle." I started it some time ago and sent it back after reading the first chapter because ... well, just because. Now, I've made it through a couple of more chapters and while I am not compelled, I will probably finish it at some point. It sets a bit too close to home for comfort, but mostly I've come to peace with it.

My next listening selection is "Hold It 'til It Hurts" by T. Geronimo Johnson.
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:30 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 3,349,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
I have finished THE GIVER -- it held my interest and was so well written but the ending really bumped it down a few notches for me. (I find this happens a lot with me where I find endings disappointing. In this case it was more confusion).
There are 3 other books in The Giver Quartet and based on the fact you thought it was well written you would probably enjoy the rest. I love Lois Lowry's writing. I own many of her books and have enjoyed them all.

Today I finished Ruth Ware's latest, The Lying Game. Kind of disappointed. I keep hoping she will write a character I like or that stays with me. Not yet.
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Old 09-05-2017, 04:58 AM
 
Location: In my own personal Twilight zone
13,608 posts, read 5,385,004 times
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I've put All our wrong Todays on hold for a while. I just can't get into it

Meanwhile I read "Und ewig schläft das Pubertier" by Jan Weiler. His second book about his pubescent kids. Kinda funny but not as good as the first book.

Yesterday I started "Before the Fall" by Noah Hawley for a buddy read on goodreads. So far so good.

I also have "The Sword of Shannara" lying around on my coffee table waiting to be started.
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:57 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel's mom View Post
"The Sword of Shannara" lying around on my coffee table waiting to be started.
I read this in my early 20s and it started me on a journey through various fantasy and science fiction. Happy travels!
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