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Old 09-25-2017, 10:52 AM
 
47,545 posts, read 6,390,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
DOCTOR ZHIVAGO

by Boris Pasternak

That's definitely a classic! I am reading a history of the 20th Century and the book mentions how Pasternak was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He accepted this, but the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was angered and denounced him and basically banned his works. The book was prohibited in the USSR. To protect himself and his loved ones, Pasternak later had to renounce the award.

He was threatened with banishment and told the Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev, "Leaving the motherland will equal death for me. I am tied to Russia by birth, by life and work."

The Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru, actually interceded on Pasternak's behalf, and he was allowed to stay in the Soviet Union. He died less than two years later of lung cancer.
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Old 09-25-2017, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,074 posts, read 11,844,907 times
Reputation: 30347
Awesome post, txwriter

At least he knows he won for the book. The movie is more a family saga...Omar Sharif (Zhivago) said in an interview...it is more a love story than the book. He also said the director asked him not to emote and express words so that the beauty say of a flower could be seen through his beautiful eyes in silence and then into his poetry.


I am into Russian history for some unknown reason...revolutions, cultural history etc. Russian composers and writers are particularly interesting to me.


[/b]
Quote:
Originally Posted by txwriter View Post
That's definitely a classic! I am reading a history of the 20th Century and the book mentions how Pasternak was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He accepted this, but the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was angered and denounced him and basically banned his works. The book was prohibited in the USSR. To protect himself and his loved ones, Pasternak later had to renounce the award.

He was threatened with banishment and told the Soviet leader, Nikita Khrushchev, "Leaving the motherland will equal death for me. I am tied to Russia by birth, by life and work."

The Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru, actually interceded on Pasternak's behalf, and he was allowed to stay in the Soviet Union. He died less than two years later of lung cancer.
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Old 09-25-2017, 12:19 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,797,961 times
Reputation: 4925
Default Breaking a ship, a bite @ a time

Ship breaker / by Paolo Bacigalupi, c2010, Little Brown & Co., YA F Baci.

Subjects
Conduct of life -- Fiction.
Recycling (Waste) -- Fiction.
Science fiction.

Summary
In a futuristic world, teenaged Nailer scavenges copper wiring from grounded oil tankers for a living, but when he finds a beached clipper ship with a girl in the wreckage, he has to decide if he should strip the ship for its wealth or rescue the girl.

Length 326 pages ;

A terrific story about values. The World envisaged is mostly a grim place, with little spots of light here & there. An excellent read, a page turner. Very impressive story telling.
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Old 09-25-2017, 02:01 PM
 
4,345 posts, read 2,791,557 times
Reputation: 5821
The Closing of the American Mind (again) - Allan Bloom, famous, needs no explanation

A History of the English Speaking Peoples - Winston Churchill. A history of England written by the greatest Englishman

Two historical fiction series by Bernard Cornwell, and The Saxon Chronicles - A story (first) of the founding of England by Alfred the Great and his heirs, and (2nd) of the Napoleonic Wars of the British Army. Both through the eyes of a fictional soldier who fought in them, respectively.

The Invention of Nature (about Alexander von Humboldt) - The travels of said Humboldt and his influence on the development of science, particularly ecology, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Not concurrently, obviously.
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Old 09-25-2017, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
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Based on the fact that I loved his (John Boyne's) The Absolutist, I just started The Heart's Invisible Furies. I'd been hemming and hawing because it's a long (for me) book at 592 pages, but he had me hooked on the second page, and I remembered EXACTLY why I'd loved The Absolutist so much.
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Old 09-26-2017, 07:57 AM
 
47,545 posts, read 6,390,063 times
Reputation: 3953
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Awesome post, txwriter

At least he knows he won for the book. The movie is more a family saga...Omar Sharif (Zhivago) said in an interview...it is more a love story than the book. He also said the director asked him not to emote and express words so that the beauty say of a flower could be seen through his beautiful eyes in silence and then into his poetry.


I am into Russian history for some unknown reason...revolutions, cultural history etc. Russian composers and writers are particularly interesting to me.


[/b]

At the time Pasternak was forced to decline the award, the Nobel Prize committee announced that his non-acceptance in no way diminished the award itself.


Pasternak's son was later able to accept the award his father received, but not until the late 1980s.
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Old 09-26-2017, 08:04 AM
 
47,545 posts, read 6,390,063 times
Reputation: 3953
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
The Closing of the American Mind (again) - Allan Bloom, famous, needs no explanation

A History of the English Speaking Peoples - Winston Churchill. A history of England written by the greatest Englishman

Two historical fiction series by Bernard Cornwell, and The Saxon Chronicles - A story (first) of the founding of England by Alfred the Great and his heirs, and (2nd) of the Napoleonic Wars of the British Army. Both through the eyes of a fictional soldier who fought in them, respectively.

The Invention of Nature (about Alexander von Humboldt) - The travels of said Humboldt and his influence on the development of science, particularly ecology, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Not concurrently, obviously.

I enjoyed the Last Kingdom series on Netflix but have not read Cornwell's Saxon novels yet.

I have read Cornwell's Gail Quest series and 1356, as well as Agincourt, and enjoyed those.

I have not yet read Churchill's History of the English Speaking People, but I did find his book The Gathering Storm, about the prelude to World War II, very interesting.
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Old 09-26-2017, 09:35 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 8,544,975 times
Reputation: 14770
Quote:
Originally Posted by DawnMTL View Post
Based on the fact that I loved his (John Boyne's) The Absolutist, I just started The Heart's Invisible Furies. I'd been hemming and hawing because it's a long (for me) book at 592 pages, but he had me hooked on the second page, and I remembered EXACTLY why I'd loved The Absolutist so much.
I was about to say "How did I miss this author?" but then recalled that I did take an extended LOA from the forum so I could read some of my TRL titles rather than just keep adding to it. Now, thanks to you, I've added THREE of his titles to my list.

Quote:
Originally Posted by txwriter View Post
I enjoyed the Last Kingdom series on Netflix but have not read Cornwell's Saxon novels yet.

I have read Cornwell's Gail Quest series and 1356, as well as Agincourt, and enjoyed those.

I have not yet read Churchill's History of the English Speaking People, but I did find his book The Gathering Storm, about the prelude to World War II, very interesting.
I was on an extended reading jag on the Henry VIII historical fiction, but have not read much of anything about the UK's more recent times. Thanks for these.

LOL! I went to Goodreads and discovered I already have his Warlord Chronicles series on my list.
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Old 09-26-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookinForMayberry View Post
I was about to say "How did I miss this author?" but then recalled that I did take an extended LOA from the forum so I could read some of my TRL titles rather than just keep adding to it. Now, thanks to you, I've added THREE of his titles to my list.
Hahaha! You're welcome?
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Old 09-26-2017, 10:20 AM
 
4,345 posts, read 2,791,557 times
Reputation: 5821
Quote:
Originally Posted by txwriter View Post
I enjoyed the Last Kingdom series on Netflix but have not read Cornwell's Saxon novels yet.

I have read Cornwell's Gail Quest series and 1356, as well as Agincourt, and enjoyed those.

I have not yet read Churchill's History of the English Speaking People, but I did find his book The Gathering Storm, about the prelude to World War II, very interesting.
The one about the Napoleonic wars is the Sharpe series. Guess I didn't list it. About campaigns in India and Spain culminating with Waterloo and, finally, the hero actually meeting the great ogre in St. Helena and getting involved in Chile's independence struggle.

Cornwell's heroes, Uthred of Bebanburg and Richard Sharpe, get to be on close terms with the chief protagonists in their defining struggles: Alfred the Great, Ubba Lothbrokson, Aethlflaed, etc. and Wellington, Nelson, Napoleon. And many other significant figures of the times. I enjoyed both.

I read the other Cornwell books you listed to. Also one about King Arthur, which was good, too.

Churchill was difficult for me. Names, events, houses, etc. Haven't read the gathering storm.

I did read another book. About George Orwell and Winston Churchill and their roles in preserving freedom in the 30's and 40's: Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom. Interesting and informative, especially for those who might think 1984 is somehow about the Right.
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