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Old 02-19-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
385 posts, read 205,536 times
Reputation: 1512

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My Name is Lucy Barton sounds interesting and so does What Was Mine.
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Old 02-19-2018, 07:50 PM
 
37,315 posts, read 59,844,229 times
Reputation: 25341
Re-reading "Sleeping Dogs" by Thomas Perry, #2 in the mysteries about the Buther's Boy, professional killer series...
Enjoy the humor Perry manages to encorporate in almost any character's musings...
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Old 02-20-2018, 08:10 PM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,720,970 times
Reputation: 6482
Just finished up Johann Hari's new book, Lost Connections. He had written the book Chasing the Scream, about the war on drugs and I found it an incredible book -- so thought provoking and different, and one that I continue to think about even though I read it a year ago. So when I heard he had a new book, which talked about how the causes of depression were different from what we think and how he has a whole new way of looking at it, I was intrigued. I was not disappointed. This is another one I think everyone should read, and it touches on so many areas of social policy. I found myself often thinking about other books I've read about the war on drugs, the opioid crisis, the dismantling of our middle class and our industrial towns, and concepts such as universal basic income. The book seems like it is aimed at people who suffer from depression, but it really has much wider social implications than just the treatment of depression. I don't happen to have depression, but I found this book fascinating and extremely relevant.

I highly recommend it.
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Old 02-21-2018, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Montreal -> CT -> MA -> Montreal -> Ottawa
17,330 posts, read 33,018,915 times
Reputation: 28903
I'm reading Mothers of Sparta: A Memoir in Pieces by Dawn Davies. I just finished the third piece -- Keeping the Faith -- which was powerful. (I skipped most of the second one.) As the title implies, it's not a linear story; she tells "stories" (pieces) of her life. It's her first book and the writing is solid. I would have preferred a beginning-middle-end book but I'll keep reading anyway.

Last edited by DawnMTL; 02-21-2018 at 06:12 AM..
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Old 02-21-2018, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,548 posts, read 30,384,815 times
Reputation: 88950
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Just finished up Johann Hari's new book, Lost Connections. He had written the book Chasing the Scream, about the war on drugs and I found it an incredible book -- so thought provoking and different, and one that I continue to think about even though I read it a year ago. So when I heard he had a new book, which talked about how the causes of depression were different from what we think and how he has a whole new way of looking at it, I was intrigued. I was not disappointed. This is another one I think everyone should read, and it touches on so many areas of social policy. I found myself often thinking about other books I've read about the war on drugs, the opioid crisis, the dismantling of our middle class and our industrial towns, and concepts such as universal basic income. The book seems like it is aimed at people who suffer from depression, but it really has much wider social implications than just the treatment of depression. I don't happen to have depression, but I found this book fascinating and extremely relevant.

I highly recommend it.
That looks good






I finished some of my books.

The first one, This Life I Live: One Man's Extraordinary, Ordinary Life and the Woman Who Changed It Forever by Rory Feek, is a fast book to read with a sad ending but lots of hope. Rory writes about his early life, the mistakes he made with no excuses, and then meeting his wife, Joey and how she changed his life. It's a heartbreak that she got cancer so young but they had a good love story. It is very heavy with their beliefs in God and his guidance for them and now just Rory. There was no preaching though. I enjoyed his story, their love and the heartbreak.


Then after driving back to the mountains to check on the house I picked up a book, Once Upon a Flock: Life with My Soulful Chickens by Lauren Scheuer which was a fun little book. If you like chickens or you want to get or have chickens this is a cute book to read. The author buys four chicks and tells us her experiences in raising them for the first time. She uses her sketches and pictures throughout this fun little book. I liked reading about the individual personalities of her girls.



Then Grave Matters: A Journey Through the Modern Funeral Industry to a Natural Way of Burial by Mark Harris. This was an informative book about 9 different burials from least green to most green.

Of course after reading that I have been doing all kinds of research on death and burials. Yeah not fun but that's how my mind gets sidetracked



Now I am reading The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman. "Lia Lee was born in 1981 to a family of recent Hmong immigrants, and soon developed symptoms of epilepsy. By 1988 she was living at home but was brain dead after a tragic cycle of misunderstanding, over-medication, and culture clash: "What the doctors viewed as clinical efficiency the Hmong viewed as frosty arrogance."

I feel for the parents, the little girl, and the doctors. It is a dilemma in medicine when their are cultural differences. As for the book since they didn't trust or follow the orders of the doctors I'm not sure why they took their little girl to them in the first place.
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Old 02-21-2018, 09:20 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
I'm about two-thirds of the way through The Fireman by Joe Hill and it's exactly the kind of book I wanted to read right now. It's a page-turner about an end-of-times infection that everyone catches. Joe Hill is Stephen King's son and their writing styles are similar, but I think that the characters in this book have more depth than those in the typical Stephen King novel.

There are a couple of odd leaps that could have been avoided or explained, but it's mostly very readable. I'll definitely read more by Hill.
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Old 02-21-2018, 10:40 AM
 
3,493 posts, read 7,930,850 times
Reputation: 7237
Quote:
Originally Posted by ylisa7 View Post
Now I am reading The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman. "Lia Lee was born in 1981 to a family of recent Hmong immigrants, and soon developed symptoms of epilepsy. By 1988 she was living at home but was brain dead after a tragic cycle of misunderstanding, over-medication, and culture clash: "What the doctors viewed as clinical efficiency the Hmong viewed as frosty arrogance."

I feel for the parents, the little girl, and the doctors. It is a dilemma in medicine when their are cultural differences. As for the book since they didn't trust or follow the orders of the doctors I'm not sure why they took their little girl to them in the first place.

The Spirit Catches You
... holds a place on my list of books that changed my life. I was a pediatric nurse practitioner for years and often saw patients who's first language was not English. We would often fumble through communicating and I'd feel like the messages were conveyed and received "good enough". After reading that book, I never saw a patient without certainty that we had someone with us (and NOT another child) who was a capable interpreter (certified interpreter or language line). So many mistakes happened because of inadequate communication.
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Old 02-21-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,074 posts, read 11,846,980 times
Reputation: 30347
Ingrid

by Charlotte Chandler

bio of Ingrid Bergman
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Old 02-21-2018, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Vermont
11,758 posts, read 14,647,352 times
Reputation: 18523
I just finished rereading All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren. The first time I read it was about thirty-five years ago.


Still very good; based on Huey P. Long. I recommend it.
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Old 02-21-2018, 08:20 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,798,355 times
Reputation: 4925
Default Sic transit ...

The Kalif's war, John Dalmas, SF, c1991, Baen Books. Part of his Regiment series, an interesting take on fallen empire, resurgence, AIs, government, conquest. This one seems more thoughtful than earlier Regiment novels I've read (the two I've read seemed to be straight military SF), & seems to be based loosely on Islam, with technocratic overlays.

He's gone now, in 2017. A pity, a fine writer, a dab hand @ empire & rebirth.

392 pages, in paperback.
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