Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-01-2018, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Canada
7,309 posts, read 9,319,117 times
Reputation: 9858

Advertisements

I read The Book of Polly which I really loved. I gave it five stars and I think it would appeal to people who liked The One-in-a-Million Boy. https://www.amazon.com/Book-Polly-No...40_&dpSrc=srch

There are almost too many quotable quotes to count so I'll just randomly pick one: ...Clocks were alive, counting the seconds, always moving forward, undoing things, that slow pulling of the shoelace that would murder the bow. Time would take our mother away from us, tune her sleep down to an empty space...

And then I read The Great Divide by Lin Enger. It gets good reviews on Amazon but it left me cold so I don't know what to say about it. Can all those Amazon reviewers be wrong? There didn't seem to be anything special about either the story or the way it was told. https://www.amazon.com/High-Divide-N...ords=lin+enger
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-01-2018, 06:29 AM
 
Location: East Coast
4,249 posts, read 3,720,970 times
Reputation: 6482
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
And then I read The Great Divide by Lin Enger. It gets good reviews on Amazon but it left me cold so I don't know what to say about it. Can all those Amazon reviewers be wrong? There didn't seem to be anything special about either the story or the way it was told. https://www.amazon.com/High-Divide-N...ords=lin+enger
Absolutely, they can. There are only 104 reviews, which is more than some books have, but much less than many books have. When there only that many reviews, it's not hard for most of them to be positive. I tend to like the goodreads reviews more, and even when the reviews are overwhelmingly positive, there are always some decent number of 1 and 2 star reviews. I always read those first to see why people didn't like the book -- sure there are always a few people that seem like they'll never be happy or dislike a book for bizarre reasons, but many reviews are quite insightful and I've almost always found someone else who didn't like the book for the same reasons I didn't.

One example is a Man Called Ove, which seems to have almost universal love, but I thought it was absolutely terrible. It was nice to find readers on goodreads who agreed with me, even though we're all clearly in the minority.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2018, 12:26 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
4,794 posts, read 2,798,355 times
Reputation: 4925
Default Here's looking at you, kid.

The night market / Jonathan Moore, 1977- , c2018, Houghton Mifflin.

Subjects
Murder -- Investigation -- Fiction.
Amnesiacs -- Fiction.
Detectives -- Crimes against -- Fiction.
Poisoning -- Fiction.
San Francisco (Calif.) -- Fiction.

Summary
"From an author who consistently gives us "suspense that never stops" (James Patterson), a near-future thriller that makes your most paranoid fantasies seem like child's play...It's late Thursday night, and Inspector Ross Carver is at a crime scene in one of the city's last luxury homes. The dead man on the floor is covered by an unknown substance that's eating through his skin. Before Carver can identify it, six FBI agents burst in and remove him from the premises. He's pushed into a disinfectant trailer, forced to drink a liquid that sends him into seizures, and is shocked unconscious. On Sunday he wakes in his bed to find his neighbor, Mia--who he's barely ever spoken to--reading aloud to him. He can't remember the crime scene or how he got home; he has no idea two days have passed. Mia says she saw him being carried into their building by plainclothes police officers, who told her he'd been poisoned. Carver doesn't really know this woman and has no way of disproving her, but his gut says to keep her close. A mind-bending, masterfully plotted thriller--written in Moore's "lush, intoxicating style" (Justin Cronin). ... The Night Market follows Carver as he works to find out what happened to him, soon realizing he's entangled in a web of conspiracy that spans the nation. ..." -- Provided by publisher.

Length 288 pages ;

Excellent noir-ish mystery, & touches of hypertech. Tightly written, plays with lots of elements of classic noir. An enjoyable read.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2018, 06:24 PM
 
4,724 posts, read 4,415,751 times
Reputation: 8481
I finished the Zookeeper's Wife (I was not reading much lately no reflection on the book).I was amazed at how much I learned, as I thought I was pretty well informed about that whole era, Warsaw ghetto etc. I am embarrassed to say I did not realize the book was non ficiton; I had thought it was historical fiction. I had it on reserve /kindle from the library so I never even searched for it to see where it was located to realize it was non fiction.
It was definitely a worthwhile read.

I am going to try Little Town on the Prairie for a bit and not sure what I will read if that doesnt catch me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2018, 06:32 PM
 
10,501 posts, read 7,031,187 times
Reputation: 32344
My wife and I are traveling to South Africa in a few weeks, so I've read a lot of literature and history of the country. Just finished Cry The Beloved Country, by Paton, and am now moving on to Nadine Gordimer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,891 posts, read 18,317,167 times
Reputation: 62766
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
My wife and I are traveling to South Africa in a few weeks, so I've read a lot of literature and history of the country. Just finished Cry The Beloved Country, by Paton, and am now moving on to Nadine Gordimer.
Have you read Michener's "The Covenant?" It's a history of South Africa much like "Centennial" is a history of Colorado.

I highly recommend "The Covenant." It's really an enlightening and beautifully written book.


BTW, you can't go wrong with Nadine Gordimer, IMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2018, 08:27 AM
 
188 posts, read 202,826 times
Reputation: 485
Don't Let Go by Harlan Coben.

I don't normally read mystery/thrillers, but I've read all of Coben's books. I usually fly through them in 2 or 3 days because they're fast paced and have a lot of twists. His books also tend to have a bit of a family/growing up is hard/missing deceased or distant loved-ones theme that really gets to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2018, 09:46 AM
 
16,579 posts, read 20,701,290 times
Reputation: 26860
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
My wife and I are traveling to South Africa in a few weeks, so I've read a lot of literature and history of the country. Just finished Cry The Beloved Country, by Paton, and am now moving on to Nadine Gordimer.
If you have time and haven't read it already, I loved Long Walk to Freedom, Nelson Mandela's autobiography. He was so humble that it's almost hard to get a feel for the enormity of what he did as a leader from this book. But I did learn a lot about him and the history of South Africa.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2018, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Citrus Heights, CA
556 posts, read 788,229 times
Reputation: 1191
Hey! Harley
by Dan Thompson
0.0 · Rating details · 0 Ratings · 0 Reviews
The open road, gasoline dripping from the pump, the smell of iced coffee with just a hint of tire rubber and the sound of an engine roaring like a panther whose foot has just been stepped on. Harley and his feline compadre ride the roads of life like champions in their first reprint collection!

I've been reading his strip on go comics and seen this was free on kindle unlimited so it'll easily add one more book for my goodreads challenge this year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-02-2018, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
27,074 posts, read 11,846,980 times
Reputation: 30347
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueFebruary View Post
Don't Let Go by Harlan Coben.

I don't normally read mystery/thrillers, but I've read all of Coben's books. I usually fly through them in 2 or 3 days because they're fast paced and have a lot of twists. His books also tend to have a bit of a family/growing up is hard/missing deceased or distant loved-ones theme that really gets to me.

Me too, love Coben for a fun, quick read...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Entertainment and Arts > Books

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top